Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Vol 3 - The Skeletal Essences Of Afro Funk 1969-1980 Double LP, Import

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

Price: £29.43 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Delivery Details
See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Vinyl, Double LP, Import, 10 Jun 2013
"Please retry"
£29.43
£18.96 £39.90
Usually dispatched within 1 to 4 weeks.
Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.
18 new from £18.96 1 used from £39.90
£29.43 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Delivery Details Usually dispatched within 1 to 4 weeks. Dispatched and sold by Amazon in certified Frustration-Free Packaging. Gift-wrap available.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Product details

  • Vinyl (10 Jun. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Double LP, Import
  • Label: Analog Africa
  • ASIN: B00BNPNTCW
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 268,480 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Ne Rien Voir, Dire, Entendre - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou
  2. Houzou Houzou Wa - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou
  3. Adjro Mi - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou
  4. Karateka - Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou

Disc: 2

  1. Akoue We Gni Gan
  2. N'Goua
  3. Houton Kan Do Gome
  4. Gbetche Non De A Ho O

Disc: 3

  1. A O O Ida
  2. Vi E Lo
  3. Pourquoi Pas?
  4. Akue We Non Houme

Disc: 4

  1. Ai Gabani
  2. Ecoutes Ma Melodie
  3. Min We Tun So

Product description

Product Description

Take funk, soul, psychedelia and rumba, mix it up with a thick dose of heavy local rhythms and throw everything in a Benin grinder. The brew is then mixed up with hypnotic Farfisa solos, gritty guitar riffs, distorted bass lines, warm horns and the result, of exorcizing proportion, will lead to frenetic body movements. Some people bang their heads, others jerk their feet or feel an urgent need to get up and start shaking their hips. One thing is common, though, to everyone who submits their ears to a spinning record by the mighty Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou: you simply can't stand still. And this new compilation is proof of that - here are 14 funky tracks by the legendary ensemble from Benin that has been deemed as "West-Africa's best kept secret", or as the "The D.N.A. of voodoo groove". Following two previous Poly-Rythmo collections released by multiple award winner label Analog Africa - "The Vodoun Effect" (2008) and "Echos Hypnotiques" (2009) - this third compilation is another proof that our ears are facing "One of the Funkiest bands in the world". Starting in 2005, Samy Ben Redjeb, Analog Africa's founder and compiler, made several trips to Benin, where he dug up most of the orchestra's output recorded between 1969 and 1983: hundreds of vinyl records and a few master tapes, in a total of 500 songs! With all that material in hands and the astonishing richness of the group's meterial, choosing the songs proved to be a tough task. Therefore, it seems only natural that it has taken a few years for this third volume to come out of Analog Africa´s sonic treasure trove. The 14 tracks presented here have never been issued outside of Africa and most of them follow the spirit and sound of the first volume, "The Vodoun Effec", which was a selection of songs released by small and obscure labels from this tiny country which was once known as Dahomey. Some of the songs presented here were recorded using a legendary piece of equipment, a Swiss made Nagra reel-to-reel recorder and one or two microphones, in private houses or open air gardens, mostly at night. And still, it would be somewhat difficult for contemporary musicians and engineers to achieve the stunning quality of raw sound and the atmosphere obtained in these recordings, even if they booked the most modern and expensive studios out there today. One thing that immediately catches the attention listening to this compilation is the band's steamroller-like grooves employed by Gustave Bentho, the mythical bass master, and Leopold Yehouessi , the fantastic drummer of the band - for many, Africa´s funkiest rhythm sections. The power lying in these tunes is phenomenal and shows true craftsmanship on both the composition and the production side, "Houton Kan Do Gome", composed by Bentho, would have made James Brown proud. "Ecoutes ma Melodie" is destined to become a classical late night tune for the many amazing tropical and afro parties taking place around the globe. "Pourquoi Pas?" and "A O O Ida" would be the kind of sound The Meters would have created were they born in Benin. On December 17th, 2012, only a few months before this release, Melome Clement, the man who formed the all-powerful orchestra, passed away victim of a heart attack. The "boss," as the other band members would tenderly call him, will be missed, but not forgotten. The soul of the music he created has permanently engraved itself in the soil of Benin.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
With such an extensive production to choose from, more than 500 songs, Analog Africa is back
with their third compilation of Poly-Rythmo songs, and "The skeletal essences of afro funk
1969-1980" holds at least 5 new songs that should go down as Poly-Rythmo greats.

The rhythm section is insanely good on some songs. Listen to the unstoppable force of drums and
bass in songs like "Adjro Mi and "Akue We Non Houme". Steamrollers!

The two closing songs, "Ecoute Ma Melodie" and "Min We Tun So", both Lohento Eskill compositions,
are incredible. The first song is a skanking bossa afro with a stylish backing choir of saxes.
"Min We Tun So" is an uncharacteristic Poly-Rythmo song and maybe the most beautiful one they
have recorded; a slow, sparse, lyrical blues.

"The skeletal essences of afro funk" is dedicated to Melome Clement, the founder and driving force
of the band. He passed away in December 2012.

Other Great Analog Africa Releases Include:

Various Artists - African Scream Contest
(Orchestre Poly-Rythmo are responsible for a lot of the phattest grooves on it, with some combustible
grooves laid down for Gabo Brown, Tidiane Kone and Vincent Ahehehinnou. An incredible compilation).
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - The Vodoun Effect
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - Echoes Hypnotiques Vol. 2
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - The 1st album
Various Artists - Legends of Benin(With a few classics from El Rego and Antoine Dougbe)
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Hands down the best vinyl I've ever come across.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More gold from Benin 23 May 2013
By The Nomadic Tribesman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It would appear that the passing last year of Melome Clement, the "Chef d'orchestre" of Poly Rythmo, has inspired Analog Africa's founder, Sammy Ben Redjeb, to serve up another helping of tracks from Benin's greatest band. While the highs on this album may not be as high as on the other two Analog Africa releases, one can rest assured that this collection is of the same high quality as those two releases. While this third volume is still focused on their funkier styles, it contains songs with many different designations: Jerk, Sato, Afro Beat, Vodoun, Pop, Cavacha, Pachanga, Bossa, and Slow. (For an album focusing on Poly-Rythmo's take on Latin and Congolese styles, try the out of print Popular African Music release Poly-Rythmo (Reminiscin' in Tempo / African Dancefloor Classics) or try the even more varied but equally difficult to get Soundway release Kings of Benin Urban Groove 1972-80.)

Most of these songs are propelled along by a solid funky rhythm laid down by drummer Yehouessi Leopold, probably Africa's second best kit drummer behind Tony Allen, and bassist Bentho Gustave. The horn section provides the song with a punch. There are plenty of great songs here. Karateka, which led off a since-removed Soundways Records mix, is a highlight here. In it the singer warns a man that although he may find a woman beautiful, her husband knows karate. A organ solo plays against a simple melody repeated on a single trumpet. It ends with a hypnontic swirl of horns, organ, and vocals over an insistent rhythm that is Poly Rythmo at their best.

A more mature release from Analog Africa, the booklet focuses on the music itself, presenting the lyrics in Fon and their English translations, except for the two pages dedicating this album to Melome Clement. Unlike other releases it gives thc catalog numbers for the original releases. Also the designation of the style and language of the song are given, e.g. Sato Fon. While not important, I wish this information had been provided on the other releases. The hidden track is still here along with the interview. Overall it's another strong release from Analog Africa which seems more concerned with providing quality releases than building an empire.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Skeletons Shake Their Funky Assences! 21 May 2013
By Hilton Royale - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
With such an extensive production to choose from, more than 500 songs, Analog Africa is back
with their third compilation of Poly-Rythmo songs, and "The skeletal essences of afro funk
1969-1980" holds at least 5 new songs that should go down as Poly-Rythmo greats.

The rhythm section is insanely good on some songs. Listen to the unstoppable force of drums and
bass in songs like "Adjro Mi and "Akue We Non Houme". Steamrollers!

The two closing songs, "Ecoute Ma Melodie" and "Min We Tun So", both Lohento Eskill compositions,
are incredible. The first song is a skanking bossa afro with a stylish backing choir of saxes.
"Min We Tun So" is an uncharacteristic Poly-Rythmo song and maybe the most beautiful one they
have recorded; a slow, sparse, lyrical blues.

"The skeletal essences of afro funk" is dedicated to Melome Clement, the founder and driving force
of the band. He passed away in December 2012.

Other Great Analog Africa Releases Include:

Various Artists - African Scream Contest
(Orchestre Poly-Rythmo are responsible for a lot of the phattest grooves on it, with some combustible
grooves laid down for Gabo Brown, Tidiane Kone and Vincent Ahehehinnou. An incredible compilation).
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - The Vodoun Effect
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - Echoes Hypnotiques Vol. 2
Orchestre Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - The 1st album
Various Artists - Legends of Benin(With a few classics from El Rego and Antoine Dougbe)
5.0 out of 5 stars Mix James Brown, late 80s Paul Simon, President Fela and N'Dour! Repeat. 6 Dec. 2015
By Dr. Petray - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Perhaps 2 of the Analog Africa series are not as high quality as the other 15 and counting. This is one of the good ones. Buy it with confidence.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Look for similar items by category