Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Listen for £0.00 with
Join Amazon Prime now
Get ad-free access to over a million songs and hundreds of playlists with Amazon Prime.

More Options
Vivaldi: 12 Violin Concertos - "La Cetra", Op. 9
 
Zoom
See larger image (with zoom)
 

Vivaldi: 12 Violin Concertos - "La Cetra", Op. 9

1 Jun. 2012 | Format: MP3

£0.00
Join Amazon Prime to add this album to your library for ad-free streaming
£13.99 to buy (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:46
30
2
3:26
30
3
2:39
30
4
4:05
30
5
2:06
30
6
3:05
30
7
3:52
30
8
3:19
30
9
3:23
30
10
4:30
30
11
2:42
30
12
3:37
30
13
2:43
30
14
2:19
30
15
3:15
30
16
3:56
30
17
3:06
30
18
4:28
Disc 2
30
1
3:00
30
2
2:14
30
3
2:56
30
4
3:49
30
5
2:45
30
6
2:47
30
7
3:24
30
8
3:02
30
9
2:46
30
10
3:37
30
11
2:26
30
12
3:03
30
13
4:17
30
14
2:13
30
15
3:13
30
16
4:59
30
17
2:18
30
18
3:59
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jun. 2012
  • Release Date: 1 Jun. 2012
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Channel Classics Records
  • Copyright: 2012 Channel Classics Records
  • Total Length: 1:57:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B008OFQZ0W
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 98,743 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul C on 30 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Vivaldi's Opus 9 (evocatively entitled "La Cetra") is a very rewarding set of concertos and a new recording is well-deserved.

I have heard two previous period instrument accounts - Kraemer on EMI and Hogwood on L'oiseau-lyre - so I was keen to see how this recording would compare. The answer is very well.

Podger and colleagues play with plenty of fizz. Indeed, one of the many strengths of this version is the lack of predictability and routine. There are numerous little touches that make this feel like a spontaneous performance rather than a recording and the music benefits greatly.

Podger's playing is superb and the orchestra is equally adept. The colourful continuo (organ, harpsichord and two lutes) adds real variety of colour.

The sound quality is excellent too.

I do have a couple of minor criticisms.

The main one is that in a couple of places the plucked continuo instruments strum rather too forcefully. It's particularly disconcerting at one point during the finale to concerto number 4; a movement that is not well-suited to such force.

The other issue I have is the strange opening to the set. Rather than just starting at the first bar of the first concerto, the band plays an improvisation - lasting 20 seconds or so - that leads into the first bar. There is a rather engaging interview video with Podger on YouTube in which she explains the origins of this idea, but it is still a but too wacky for me. It's stylish enough though and maybe I will get used to it.

Such comments aside though, this is a very exciting and entertaining account of La Cetra.
Read more ›
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This set of twelve concertos was recorded in early 2012. The recording was made in the resonant acoustics of a church. In addition, the recording is closely balanced with a very substantial bass presence. This emphasis makes the solo violin more of a part with the whole rather than being spotlit as a separate solo entity. Finally, the recording is transferred to disc at a very high level which emphasises all the above points. In order to get a more realistic balance as if one were in the audience rather than being one of the players, it is necessary to reduce the playback level by some 4 decibels. At that point there is a considerable improvement and the bass becomes less dominant.

Rachel Podger brings a relatively light touch to these works when compared to various Italian groups that have been recorded recently and who favour very dramatic renderings of Vivaldi's concertos. There are no direct comparisons currently available of these Opus 9 concertos at the moment though so that may be jumping to conclusions before the event.

The key thing to note about this set of 12 concertos is the title which translated means 'the lyre.' That was an essentially gentle instrument and that may well explain the absence of much of the display element in the solo writing of these concertos. Vivaldi is arguably much more concerned with integrating the soloist with the other players throughout these concertos. That is not to say that the concertos are anything less than demanding for the player, but Rachel Podger is justified in concentrating on blending rather than displaying her capabilities in this set.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Absolutely superb rendition of these works, sadly not aired enough on such as Classic FM (I am willing to be disabused but the top hundreds seem to be always clogged with more composers such as Vaughan Williams — although I do like some of his works, Shostakovitch, Stravinsky, and modern composers - Henry Kelly selected a more reliably eclectic mix) which goes for much of Vivaldi's extensive collection.

Podger delivers as always, the opening bars of Concerto No. 1 in C major, RV 181a are sheer magic. I have a hunch this was used by the minstrels at Beaulieu to begin those Medieval (yes I know the period is out) in the early 1970s.

Podger's combination with Andrew Manze on Bach: Solo & Double Violin Concertos (BWV 1041-1043, 1060) is also well worth looking up. When I try to insert a product link it points to "ASIN:1459681428 The Doctors Who's Who: Celebrating Its 50th Year: The Story Behind Every Face Of The Iconic Time Lord" for some reason.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The playing is superb, recording equally so, you can feel the emotions, vigor and sensitivity and I did not realize that I could so enjoy this type of music
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is real treat for the ears. Rachel Podger has the perfect blend of intelligence, inventiveness, spontaneity and technical acumen in this music. She conveys all the imagination and sheer joy of Vivaldi's writing with a wonderfully sweet-toned, perfectly articulated sound. The Holland Baroque Society are in complete harmony with her, rhythmically alive and endlessly energetic. The recorded sound is present, detailed and warm. Baroque playing doesn't get much better than this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category