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Find Virgil (A Novel of Revenge) by [Freudberg, Frank]
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Find Virgil (A Novel of Revenge) Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Length: 358 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

About the Author

Frank Freudberg is a novelist, journalist and ghostwriter. He enjoys writing about underdogs and their battles with forces seemingly more powerful than they are -- and he particularly likes watching the little guy prevail. Freudberg lives near Philadelphia and he's contributed to Reuters, Associated Press, the Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Der Spiegel and others. His work has been mentioned in many notable publications including Time, Newsweek, and The Guardian.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2731 KB
  • Print Length: 358 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Inside Job Media (15 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00G5JD8TK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #515,983 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book, as a former smoker it brought the message close to home, I dodged a bullet!
Well written it kept me guessing until the very end showing a perspective's rarely explored in books and I wasn't quiet ready for the end. I look forward to reading more from this author
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Format: Kindle Edition
Martin Munter is looking forward to his place in history – even though he may never live to see it. He is a man who feels cheated. He’s cheated out of a job; cheated out of life insurance; and cheated out of a chance for a long and fulfilling life. He’s dying of lung cancer, not due to his own making – he’s not a smoker. He’s dying because of second hand smoke. He grew up in a Philadelphia suburb with his chain-smoking, drunken father. His mother committed suicide when he was just a boy. Now, it’s 1995 and Munter is about to pull out all the plugs as he battles the big cigarette companies.

Munter packaged seven hundred FedEx envelopes with a pack of Easy Lights; a disposable lighter; a survey; and a letter to the recipient. The first 250 consumers to respond would earn $100 for a completed survey of their opinion of the enclosed cigarettes. It would be the last cigarette they’d ever smoke. They were laced with a sodium cyanide solution. Munter waited for the news story to break. Over 122 deaths with multiple injuries all across the United States – but the numbers were just beginning to grow. Now it’s up to the cigarette companies to meet his demands.

Tom Rhoads has problems of his own. He has his own PI business. He was a former security consultant for Nick Pratt, President and CEO of the largest cigarette company, Old Carolina Tobacco. On days when Rhoads wasn’t hung over, he was very good at his job. There’s a compelling reason why Rhoades no longer works for Pratt. Now, Rhoades is being pulled back into the picture when the FBI seeks him out about the current situation.

This became a very compelling and stimulating story as the reader gets to know both Martin Munter (who nicknamed himself Virgil) and Tom Rhoads.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I don't smoke so i didn't think i would be interested in this book. About a cigarette company getting targeted by a killer. But i couldn't be more wrong. I loved Muntor big fan of him.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Loved this book, definitely worthy of five stars. Kept my suspense all the way through and was very interesting. It flicked from one part of the story to another and back again but not in a confusing way. The characters were likeable especially Rhoads, the main character, all the way through the story I kept hoping things would work out for him and his brother. Now you'll have to read it for yourself to see if they do. Highly recommended.
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By Ashrae TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Sept. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
Having read and enjoyed Baby Please Don't Go, by the same author, I was interested to see what else he had written so I gave this a go.

I found the beginning of this book a little convoluted and hard to follow and I had to really concentrate (probably a me thing rather than a book thing) but, once I got into it, the time and pages literally just flew by as I was drawn so far into the story it was a challenge putting the book down.
I found this to be a book where again, I wasn't keen on the main character. I understand why he felt the need to do what he did but part of me just isn't OK with the means he took to get to the end. Nothing justifies what he did. But I guess, in his mind, when you have nothing to lose by doing what you want to then, why shouldn't you!?!
I also didn't really warm to Rhodes either although, I liked him a whole lot better than Munter. I found his motivation to be a little off key and, for all he said, I wasn't convinced re the relationship with his brother.
I think for me personally the whole major theme of this book is one of greed and this manifests itself into the majority of the main characters attitudes and selfishness. "I don't care how what I do affects other people, as long as it's all good for me" seems to be the running motto for most of them. I get that Munter feels hard done by and I agree that someone should probably be accountable but I can't condone what he did. This makes for quite a tough read in parts. However, the style compensates for this very well as it delivers a lot of "messages" and information in the form of news/police reports written in short, punchy 1-page chapters. This also keeps the book moving at a cracking pace. Information is delivered efficiently.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Mark Muntor was undoubtedly an unwilling Christ. He refused to pay for the sins the world has heaped up on themselves. Starting at home, he had to endure his enormously fat wife, who smoked two packets of unfiltered Camels a day, taught their two daughters to do the same, and left him after the divorce to live without real human contact for ten whole years.

There was his chain-smoking drunkard dad, who called him a loser for not saving his mother's life after she overdosed and committed suicide. His dad blamed him for not being more than the sum total of the person he became. Muntor was also a laid-off journalist, who wasn't appreciated by his industry either. He was convinced of that.

His friends did not fare better either. They were like the rest of America:
"dump, useless people who perhaps read an average of five books a year, mostly bulls*** recycled pop-spych disguised as self-help, and romance stories. Muntor read more than 200 books per year and could have qualified for several PhDs by now. The fat, lazy and ignorant lived on, like cows chewing the cud of the Madison Avenue and government propaganda that had replaced intellect in American life. People were too stupid and weak to understand the lesson he presented to them. They polluted their bodies and minds with physiological and intellectual poisons—drink, drugs, cigarettes, ludicrous TV shows, books aimed at the masses. He had hardened himself, become even more of a model of human potential. His body was a temple, and he was the high priest. The more people failed to respond to the lesson he delivered merely by walking out the house each day, the more he became devoted to his mission. In the end, he knew that the cows would never learn."
And now he is the one dying of lung cancer.
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