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Violent Delights Hardcover – 15 Oct 1997

4.1 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Blake Publishing; First Edition edition (15 Oct. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857821963
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857821963
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 16.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 292,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
A good read, but I fear this author is a bit of a Walter Mitty. Too many inconsistencies for me. For example, when he first met Farrell, he claims he was a JNCO in the Paras based at Palace Barracks in 1974-75. There were no paras based in Palace Barracks in 74-75. For a paratrooper on an operational tour in Belfast, he seems to have had more free time to socialise than was a reality in the 70's, and access to cars etc. Any real Para/SAS soldier would have known that Farrell would have been under surveillance after release from prison. As a Sgt in the SAS, he would have known that she would have been watched and reported on, thus compromising him and his affair.

He calls the Royal Anglian Regiment The Royal "Anglican" Regiment - an error that no soldier with any experience would make.

When he describes his participation in the ambush at Loughall he tells how he changed his magazine on his GPMG - schoolboy error, the GPMG is belt fed, not magazine fed. There is also too much sympathy for the republican cause, too apologetic for me.

When he describes his participation in the Falklands war, he says that after the paras captured Goose Green his patrol was picked up by helicopter and extracted to Bluff Cove, but Bluff Cove was not secured by 2 Para until several days after the battle of Goose Green. He talks of being armed with an M203 "multi-barrelled anti tank missile" but it's no such thing-it's simply an M16 rifle with a 40mm grenade launcher under the barrel.

No, Scott Graham is a Walter Mitty who has read a lot of books and fantasised this fiction which is full of errors that any experienced soldier will spot - and I was a paratrooper for 36 years
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Format: Hardcover
I first read this book under it's original title but bought it again earlier this year as I remember thinking it was a great book.

I actually read this before joining the forces in 1988 so at the time I was enthralled by its content, on reading it again all these years later I too realise there is a lot of questions around the accuracy of this book. Don't get me wrong its a great read and it deserves the 4 starts I've given it in my opinion but as others have said, there are inconsistencies throughout and the chances of the British or Irish finding out about this affair is unlikely to say the least, especially around this time in the conflict.
Also she never knew he was SAS according to the book, that part is possible but knowing these guys as I do, the regiment comes first and I don't believe his love for her would have stopped him from reporting his findings about her and even dropping her himself.
An old book but worth a read, enjoy it for what it is, fact based fiction!
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Format: Hardcover
`Never judge a book by its cover' is an old homily; the same applies to its fly-leave which states that the author was decorated for `his heroism in Northern Ireland and the Falklands' except it appears, he wasn't - he was awarded campaign medals just as any other serviceman was in those conflicts.

So if that's wrong, what else is? Quite a lot, actually. Coming from a staunchly Republican background in West Belfast, is it likely that the pubescent Mairead Farrell would have been bowled-over by anyone even remotely English, five years into the troubles? And after ten years' imprisonment, drinking in even more of a hatred of England, would she have felt the same afterwards and fallen into the author's arms? Perhaps she was swayed by the fact that her alleged welder had searched the streets for her and by a miraculous coincidence just happened to spot her. Let's get something straight, shall we? No-one - in the author's words, who `looked like a British Army Para or an off-duty PTI' - would have driven slowly around the Falls Road area, alone and unarmed, in broad daylight, keenly looking at passers-by in 1986, no matter how much `in lurve' they were.

No-one who has any knowledge of the way the security services worked at that time in Ulster - and Graham certainly did - would be in any doubt that as soon as a dangerous terrorist like Farrell was released from prison, she would have been under electronic and physical surveillance, noting who telephoned her, whom she corresponded with and whom she met.
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Format: Hardcover
In short, a paratrooper-cum-SAS elitest tells of his relationship with NI's most famous female republican. From a historical and contextual point of view, this book isn't bad. The writer does well in almost fly-on-the-wall, photographic situations by recounting the way world was between 1974 and 1988. Even prior to that, with some pre- and early Troubles accounts, the synopsis is impartial and fairly accurate. That's where the authenticity ends. To say the lead narrative of the story is legit would be naive. Our author appears to have had an infatuation with a female he casts as an anti-hero of sorts, which plays out and gets milked to the point of cringeworthiness. I would recommend this as a novel and as a bystander's view of the Troubles but nothing more. Anybody with vivid memories of NI's darkest days will find the narrator's secret crush detailed hard to read, therefore take with a grain of salt.
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