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The Village of Stepanchikovo: And its Inhabitants: from the Notes of an Unknown (Penguin Classics) by [Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, Avsey, Ignat]
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The Village of Stepanchikovo: And its Inhabitants: from the Notes of an Unknown (Penguin Classics) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Length: 224 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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About the Author

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky was born in Moscow in 1821. His debut, the epistolary novella Poor Folk(1846), made his name. In 1849 he was arrested for involvement with the politically subversive 'Petrashevsky circle' and until 1854 he lived in a convict prison in Omsk, Siberia. From this experience came The House of the Dead (1860-2). In 1860 he began the journal Vremya (Time). Already married, he fell in love with one of his contributors, Appollinaria Suslova, eighteen years his junior, and developed a ruinous passion for roulette. After the death of his first wife, Maria, in 1864, Dostoyevsky completed Notes from Underground and began work towards Crime and Punishment (1866). The major novels of his late period are The Idiot (1868), Demons(1871-2) and The Brothers Karamazov (1879-80). He died in 1881.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1010 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (25 Jan. 2007)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00433T3QC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #642,255 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By Luc REYNAERT TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 July 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This highly spirited character comedy turns around an impudent schemer, who became the real master of a household through his `ties' with the mother of an estate owner, `uncle'. The latter is a credulous, irresolute weakling, who is terrorized of giving offense. He is completely mystified by the confident of his mother, who is not more than an arrogant, bullying parasite, but a master in psychological blackmail.
Other important characters are a young heiress, whom the family wants to couple with `uncle' in order to save the estate, and a young girl who is in love with `uncle'.
The whole bunch around them, are mainly intriguers and vipers, who are using `uncle' as a punching ball.

In one of his first novels, Dostoyevsky shows already that he is a master painter of psychological warfare, in depth character sketches, complicated intrigues and hilarious scenes with embarrassing confrontations.
Like in all his earlier work, one can find here the basic brushes of the great characters in his major novels. One thinks here immediately of `The Idiot'.

In his excellent introduction, which should be read as an afterword, the translator I. Avsey explains that the character of `uncle' is a portrait and an attack on Gogol, because of his reactionary comments in `Selected Passages from Correspondence with Friends'.

This book is highly recommended to all lovers of world literature and all fans of Dostoyevsky.
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Format: Paperback
When I first read The Village of Stepanchikovo I saw Foma Fomich Opiskin as a detestable character and I could hardly turn the pages fast enough to see whether he would get this just deserts.
However, with the passage of time, my judgement of Foma mellowed and I became more sympathetic towards him. I thought the book could do with a second reading to check out this revised opinion. Foma Fomich is a caricature and to some extent I think we all have similar characters in our own lives. It is somebody we initially respect for fulfilling a specific role in our lives. Perhaps it's a schoolmistress or headmaster, a pop star, a football manager, a university language teacher or even an ex-prime-minister. It's somebody with whom our initial contact is quite straightforward, in a clearly defined role, but then we put him or her up onto a sort of pedestal of reverent respect. They let it go to their head and become pompous and arrogant and start making pronouncements well outside their original remit. A sort of surrogate parent-child relationship develops. If we're not careful such people can start to dominate our lives, unless we take a firm stance and let them know their limits.
Well worth a second read. Thanks to Ignat Avsey for his translation.
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Format: Paperback
When I first read The Village of Stepanchikovo I saw Foma Fomich Opiskin as a detestable character and I could hardly turn the pages fast enough to see whether he would get this just deserts.
However, with the passage of time, my judgement of Foma mellowed and I thought the book could do with a second reading. Of course Foma Fomich is a caricature. To some extent, I think we all have similar characters in our own lives. It is somebody we initially give respect for fulfilling a specific role in our lives. Perhaps it's a schoolmistress or headmaster, a pop star, a football manager, a university language teacher or even an ex-prime-minister. It's somebody with whom our initial contact is quite straightforward, in a clearly defined role, but then we put him or her up onto a sort of pedestal of reverent respect. They let it go to their head and become pompous and arrogant and start making pronouncements well outside their original remit. A sort of surrogate parent-child relationship develops. If we're not careful such people can start to dominate our lives, unless we take a firm stance and let them know their limits.
Well worth a second read. Thanks to Ignat Avsey for this translation.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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