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on 8 August 2017
Having read several accounts of the SAS in the Gulf, especially this mission , I thought I best read this account.

The author comes across as quite bitter chap with a lot of axes to grind, especially against the RSM, Peter Ratcliffe.

There is a lot of negativity in the book, with there always being something to moan about, with very little of the 'who dares wins' attitude on display.

Having read Ratcliffe's account, it is clear that his comes across as far closer to the truth than this version. Ratcliffe was awarded the DCM for his leadership, having previously been awarded an MID for his role in the Falklands War.

Those with any true military knowledge know that you do not argue with the RSM or have chats to tell him the error of his ways, especially from a JNCO.

This whole book comes across as fictional as the idea of a Cpl running an entire SAS department.

Don't waste your money on this book, it is poorly written and just the ramblings of quite a bitter ex soldier who wants to moan, more than likely to hide his own inadequacies.
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on 10 January 2015
I've now read a few accounts of this mission and this one has moved me
I will recommend this book to anyone
As it happens I'm a six foot four rugby player sat here in tears
Amazing!!
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on 29 May 2017
Excellent
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on 22 January 2002
The book covers Peter Crossland's life from his early years, through joining the army, to his service in the SAS and lastly his reflections after leaving the regiment.
The early years are fairly standard stuff, with some interesting information on his service in Northern Ireland, particularly in relation to their repsonse to a planned IRA ambush.
The most absorbing part of the book covers his service in the Gulf, particularly the patrol and attack on Victor Two. Crossland's style is brisk, and an easy read. He describes the minutae of day to day existance and his view of the tensions and dynamics within the patrol.
The book covers the same events and follows a similar line to that taken by Cameron Spence in "Sabre Squadron". One of the interesting things to do, given the pseudonyms used by each author are different, is to work out who is who in each book and compare their assessments of the individuals and actions concerned. Some of the conclusions they reach are similar, some are different. Peter Ratcliffe's book "Eye of the Storm" gives an altogether different persepctive (Ratcliffe is the RSM mentioned in this and Spence's book).
What makes this book different to other books, is the degree of reflection on his personal life that Crossland undertakes. Without going into too much detail, his military service clearly took its toll on his relationships with his family, and there is a very moving description of his feelings for his sons, who don't have an easy life for more than one reason.
I enjoyed the book and would recommend it. I would add the caveat that, as with all personal testimony, this is only one individual's perspective. People mis-remember, embelish and omit. Only by reading widely can one hope to gain some sort of objectivity to events.
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on 31 May 2008
'Yorky' in this book describes his exploits in the first Gulf war when the SAS's A squadron were sent behind enemy lines to stop Iraq launching scud missiles on Irasel, one of the best chapters is denintly about the attack on victor two, you can find other books about the attack on victor two in books as 'Eye of the storm' by Peter Ratcliffe or 'Sabre Squadron' by Cameron Spence which are much better books, but never the less Victor two is a good book that a fan of Special forces will enjoy.
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on 31 December 2016
Action packed account of a mission behind enemy lines and a touching insight of a father doing his best for his two sons whilst serving in the world's toughest regiment
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on 29 April 2012
Peter cuts right to the chase. Its a straight to the point and concise account of what happened on the ground. Its also a good account of the more personal and human aspects of being involved in conflict - without bravado. This makes it a very different book to some of the more colourful tales out there, and I suspect its probably the more honest and truthful version.
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on 3 August 2016
A good, easy read
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on 12 June 2016
An interesting viewpoint of SAS operations in the first gulf war. Has a sense of authenticity and honesty missing from the other tales of derring do from the same era. One wonders if this is the book that upset the authorities and led them to slap a ban on SAS memoirs around that period?
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on 22 January 2016
another great read
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