FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Venus in Transit has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: EXCELLENT CONDITION. CONTENT CLEAN, TIDY AND FRESH THROUGHOUT. **SENT FIRST CLASS MAIL FROM UK STOCK.** "Always choose readerz3, the best deal around for YOU and me!" 12
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Venus in Transit Paperback – 14 Apr 2015

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£25.95
£10.39 £0.41
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£25.95 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; New Ed edition (14 April 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691115893
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691115894
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,068,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

ÝA¨ snappy, enjoyable, and eminently readable historical account . . . -- David W. Hughes "The Observatory"

ÝA¨ charming guide. . . . Maor weaves his tale with clarity and historical precision. -- Owen Gingerich "Times Literary Supplement"

ÝMaor¨ reminds the reader what a long and circuitous route science has traveled to take the measure of the world around us. -- Laurence A. Marschall "The Sciences"


Maor brings science history vividly alive in a manner reminiscent of Eco, with tales of eccentric astronomers, political corruption, and conspiracy. A delight to anyone interested in astronomy or the history of science. -- Booklist



Eli Maor's book is primarily a straightforward historical account of the five observed transits of Venus. . . . [It] will appeal to readers who enjoy an easy-going story. . . . -- Journal of the British Astronomical Association



Maor examines the international intrigue, history, mystery, and science of what was considered an extremely important event that helped determine the accurate measure of the distance from Earth to the Sun. -- Mercury



"Venus in Transit" is a well written and documented account of previous transits, giving a real flavor of the characters involved and their achievements and disappointments in observing this rare event. -- Astronomy Now



This book will fascinate those interested in chasing rare astronomical events. -- Choice


Eli Maor's book is primarily a straightforward historical account of the five observed transits of Venus. . . . [It] will appeal to readers who enjoy an easy-going story. . . . -- "Journal of the British Astronomical Association

Maor brings science history vividly alive in a manner reminiscent of Eco, with tales of eccentric astronomers, political corruption, and conspiracy. A delight to anyone interested in astronomy or the history of science. -- "Booklist

Maor examines the international intrigue, history, mystery, and science of what was considered an extremely important event that helped determine the accurate measure of the distance from Earth to the Sun. -- "Mercury

This book will fascinate those interested in chasing rare astronomical events. -- "Choice

"Venus in Transit" is a well written and documented account of previous transits, giving a real flavor of the characters involved and their achievements and disappointments in observing this rare event. -- "Astronomy Now

[Maor] reminds the reader what a long and circuitous route science has traveled to take the measure of the world around us.--Laurence A. Marschall "The Sciences "

In the course of recounting important transits of the past, Maor introduces us to some of the forgotten personalities in the history of astronomy.--Dan Falk "The Toronto Globe and Mail "

A small gem of a book. . . . Maor explains with grace, clarity and wit why this event is so rare, and describes the heroic efforts and frequent misadventures involved in attempts to observe the five transits that have occurred in the almost 400 years since Johannes Kepler, the discoverer of the laws of planetary motion that bear his name, predicted their occurrence.--Jeffrey Marsh "The Washington Times "

[A] charming guide. . . . Maor weaves his tale with clarity and historical precision.--Owen Gingerich "Times Literary Supplement "

I enjoyed Maor's book; it is written in an easy, clear, anecdotal way that makes great bedtime reading.--Done Fernie "Nature "

Brimming with historical anecdote and up-to-date information, this book provides much more than a simple introduction to two of the most anticipated celestial events of the 21st century. . . .It chronicles the fervor, triumph, and folly that accompanied the last five transits of Venus witnessed by Western civilization . . . This book will please the history aficionado and the most ardent amateur astronomer.--William Schomaker "Astronomy "

[A] snappy, enjoyable, and eminently readable historical account . . .--David W. Hughes "The Observatory "

Nobody alive has seen a transit of Venus, and if you miss the 2004 and 2012 events you will not have another chance. If you are interested in transit history, read Maor.--John Westfall "Sky and Telescope "

"June 8, 2004: Venus in Transit" is short and entertaining. This book is an engaging retelling of the story for a popular audience.--James Evans "ISIS "


"June 8, 2004: Venus in Transit" is short and entertaining. This book is an engaging retelling of the story for a popular audience.--James Evans "ISIS "


[Maor] reminds the reader what a long and circuitous route science has traveled to take the measure of the world around us.
--Laurence A. Marschall "The Sciences "


In the course of recounting important transits of the past, Maor introduces us to some of the forgotten personalities in the history of astronomy.
--Dan Falk "The Toronto Globe and Mail "


A small gem of a book. . . . Maor explains with grace, clarity and wit why this event is so rare, and describes the heroic efforts and frequent misadventures involved in attempts to observe the five transits that have occurred in the almost 400 years since Johannes Kepler, the discoverer of the laws of planetary motion that bear his name, predicted their occurrence.
--Jeffrey Marsh "The Washington Times "


Brimming with historical anecdote and up-to-date information, this book provides much more than a simple introduction to two of the most anticipated celestial events of the 21st century. . . .It chronicles the fervor, triumph, and folly that accompanied the last five transits of Venus witnessed by Western civilization . . . This book will please the history aficionado and the most ardent amateur astronomer.
--William Schomaker "Astronomy "


[A] charming guide. . . . Maor weaves his tale with clarity and historical precision.
--Owen Gingerich "Times Literary Supplement "


I enjoyed Maor's book; it is written in an easy, clear, anecdotal way that makes great bedtime reading.
--Done Fernie "Nature "


[A] snappy, enjoyable, and eminently readable historical account . . .
--David W. Hughes "The Observatory "


Nobody alive has seen a transit of Venus, and if you miss the 2004 and 2012 events you will not have another chance. If you are interested in transit history, read Maor.
--John Westfall "Sky and Telescope "



"June 8, 2004: Venus in Transit" is short and entertaining. This book is an engaging retelling of the story for a popular audience.
--James Evans "ISIS "

"Maor brings science history vividly alive in a manner reminiscent of Eco, with tales of eccentric astronomers, political corruption, and conspiracy. A delight to anyone interested in astronomy or the history of science."--"Booklist"

"Eli Maor's book is primarily a straightforward historical account of the five observed transits of Venus. . . . [It] will appeal to readers who enjoy an easy-going story."--"Journal of the British Astronomical Association"

"[Maor] reminds the reader what a long and circuitous route science has traveled to take the measure of the world around us."--Laurence A. Marschall, "The Sciences"

"In the course of recounting important transits of the past, Maor introduces us to some of the forgotten personalities in the history of astronomy."--Dan Falk, "The Toronto Globe and Mail"

"Maor examines the international intrigue, history, mystery, and science of what was considered an extremely important event that helped determine the accurate measure of the distance from Earth to the Sun."--"Mercury"

"A small gem of a book. . . . Maor explains with grace, clarity and wit why this event is so rare, and describes the heroic efforts and frequent misadventures involved in attempts to observe the five transits that have occurred in the almost 400 years since Johannes Kepler, the discoverer of the laws of planetary motion that bear his name, predicted their occurrence."--Jeffrey Marsh, "The Washington Times"

"Brimming with historical anecdote and up-to-date information, this book provides much more than a simple introduction to two of the most anticipated celestial events of the 21st century. . . .It chronicles the fervor, triumph, and folly that accompanied the last five transits of Venus witnessed by Western civilization . . . This book will please the history aficionado and the most ardent amateur astronomer."--William Schomaker, "Astronomy"

"[A] charming guide. . . . Maor weaves his tale with clarity and historical precision."--Owen Gingerich, "Times Literary Supplement"

"This book will fascinate those interested in chasing rare astronomical events."--"Choice"

"I enjoyed Maor's book; it is written in an easy, clear, anecdotal way that makes great bedtime reading."--Done Fernie, "Nature"

"[A] snappy, enjoyable, and eminently readable historical account."--David W. Hughes, "The Observatory"

"Nobody alive has seen a transit of Venus, and if you miss the 2004 and 2012 events you will not have another chance. If you are interested in transit history, read Maor."--John Westfall, "Sky and Telescope"

""June 8, 2004: Venus in Transit" is short and entertaining. This book is an engaging retelling of the story for a popular audience."--James Evans, "ISIS"

""Venus in Transit" is a well written and documented account of previous transits, giving a real flavor of the characters involved and their achievements and disappointments in observing this rare event."--"Astronomy Now"

From the Back Cover

"The book gathers much historical information not readily available, on a topic not frequently treated . . . an entertaining book, readily understandable to a general audience."--Jack Zirker, author of "Total Eclipses of the Sun"

"This is a very well-written book, providing a wealth of historical facts."--Joe Rao, Hayden Planetarium

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 May 2004
Format: Hardcover
Whether you are interested in astronomy or not, you will find this book to be a rewarding expansion of your understanding of that important, awe-inspiring part of the scientific pantheon.
The phrase, transit of Venus, describes the process whereby Venus appears to cross the Sun during daylight hours from earth. For most of recorded history, few probably paid attention. And for good reason. You would have been blinded by looking directly into the sun except very near sunrise and sunset. And you had to know when and where to be looking because transits of Venus are rare. Besides, you could see Venus on most nights anyway.
In this delightful background preparation for the next transit of Venus on June 8, 2004, Professor Maor provides all the background you could hope for to help you understand how celestial events (especially this one) are forecast so accurately, their scientific implications, and how to enjoy them yourself.
Many famous astronomers were encouraged to enter the field by first observing an eclipse. The ability to accurately predict the timing and the nature of the event left them with awe. Perhaps this transit of Venus will be our most productive ever for generating scholars for the 21st century. Oh, by the way, if you miss this one, there's another one coming along 8 years later in 2012.
Although ostensibly focused on a type of celestial event, the book has a broader theme: How humankind can use reason to deduce new understanding of the physical world.
The book begins with the origins of modern astronomy, by describing the observations of Galileo, the conclusions about the solar system by Copernicus, careful measurements of Brahe, Kepler's deductions from those observations, and Newton's application of these lessons into his Principia.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
whats the point
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback