• RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £4.00 (50%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Vathek 2/e (Oxford World'... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by momox co uk
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: From Europe's No.1 in used books & media articles.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Vathek 2/e (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – 13 Jun 2013

Save an extra 10% with Amazon Student*

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£3.99
£2.39 £0.19
Promotion Message Amazon Students Members Get 10% Off 2 Promotion(s)

Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

*Save an extra 10% on this product with Amazon Student
From 28 June, 2016, Amazon Student members will receive an extra 10% off 1000s of selected books. The Offer will be automatically applied to your order at checkout. This Offer ends at 23:59pm BST on 16 October, 2016. Terms & Conditions apply. Learn more
£3.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Amazon Students Members Get an Extra 10% Off Selected Books Here's how (terms and conditions apply)
  • Save 10% on Books for Schools offered by Amazon.co.uk when you purchase 10 or more of the same book. Here's how (terms and conditions apply) Enter code SCHOOLS2016 at checkout. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • Vathek 2/e (Oxford World's Classics)
  • +
  • The Castle of Otranto A Gothic Story 3/e (Oxford World's Classics)
  • +
  • The Italian n/e (Oxford World's Classics)
Total price: £10.97
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 2 edition (13 Jun. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199576955
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199576951
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 1.3 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 154,782 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Thomas Keymer has edited Oxford World's Classics editions of Johnson's Rasselas, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Richardson's Pamela and Fielding's Joseph Andrews and Shamela. He is the author of numerous critical essays and books, editor of The Cambridge Companion to Laurence Sterne (2009) and co-editor, with Jon Mee, of The Cambridge Companion to English Literature from 1740 to 1830.


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
William Beckford was an interesting character. Wealthy, flamboyant, frequently mired in scandal, the genius (or lunatic) behind the architecturally improbable Fonthill Abbey and the author of one of the first Gothic novels - Vathek, which was first published in 1786. Vathek took many of the typical themes of the Gothic novel such as the desire to provoke feelings of awe and wonder in the reader, not to mention the thrill of terror, and added a colourful twist in the form of a beautifully described oriental setting. The story itself is a variation on the Faustian tale in which the Giaour, an unpleasant-looking supernatural being with streaked green teeth, promises the tyrannical Caliph Vathek a sight of his awe-inspiring underground kingdom in return for, amongst other things, the sacrifice of the fifty most beautiful youths in the Caliph's dominions. The deal is sealed, and Vathek's wilful march to damnation begins.

What sets the novel apart from so much early Gothic fiction is not only its use of an oriental setting but rather the quality of the writing. Beckford wrote his book in French so as to set it apart from the tawdry pieces written in vulgar English. The French text was then translated, under Beckford's watchful eye, by Samuel Henley. Between them the two men ended up with a very elegant short English novel. In particular the descriptions of the strange events such as Vathek's witch-like mother burning noxious substances at the top of a tower in order to please the Giaour have a dream-like intensity. Similarly humour is used to lighten the mood such as when the beautiful and nubile Nouronihar runs rings around one of Vathek's elderly and dusty advisors.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As with all Oxford Classics, the book itself is nice quality and has informative frontmatter/intro. However I'm just not into Romantic literature and this book is no exception. It's a strange Orientalised tale which is not particularly compelling, but if you like Romantic novels and mystical Eastern stories you might enjoy it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Cynical, surreal and utterly enthralling. With images and sentences that are sure to stick in your mind, this book will truly open your eyes to not only the Oriental tale, but also the Victorian Gothic.
If you want to see a man, with a hedonistic complex for knowledge and pleasures of the flesh fall further tha even Faust; this could be the book you're looking for.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good price fast shipping what more is there to say
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For hard-core fans of Gothic only.... 20 Aug. 2013
By gammyraye - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This short novel, first published in 1786, is often mentioned in the list of prominent early Gothic offerings, but it is Gothic with a twist, owing more to the influence of "The Arabian Nights" than to "The Castle of Otranto," which is considered the first Gothic novel. The setting is the opulent East, rather than a crumbling English castle, and the villain is a powerful Caliph who seeks ultimate knowledge and power. He is spurred on by his ruthlessly wicked mother as he travels to meet Eblis, the Islamic equivalent of Satan, to trade his soul for promised rewards.

Along the way, the reader is treated to accounts of numerous supernatural occurrences (the Caliph can kill with just a hard stare from his black eyes, for example) and even more accounts of atrocities committed to gain favor with Eblis (pushing 50 young children off a cliff, for example). The Caliph is distracted from his quest when he becomes enamored with a seductive young lady, but his mother tracks him down and pushes him into completing his journey.

But as we all know, pacts with the Devil never turn out well for mortals, and so it is with the Caliph.

Surprisingly enough, the novel is entertaining, although the plot consists just of one fantastical and bizarre incident after another, without any of the suspense or character development normally considered necessary for a good novel. The tone, which is slyly humorous and ironic, rescues the book from the boredom brought on by a mere catalog of incidents. My favorite part is when dwarfs are pinched to death.

Even more of interest and wonder is the biography of the writer, as given in the introduction (augmented by my internet research). William Beckford was the richest man in England at the time, and built Fonthill Abbey, a huge Gothic cathedral-like castle with the highest tower in England, which housed his huge collection of art and other esoteric treasures and included a retinue of lavishly attired foreign servants, including a dwarf who opened the door. His sexual behavior was so reprehensible to society that he was forced from time to time to leave his home for the Continent to escape scandal and possible prosecution. He was widely supposed by neighbors to hold orgies with unspeakable acts in his isolated castle. More than one research source indicates that this novel was considered to be semi-autobiographical, particularly in reference to the mother of the Caliph and Beckford's real mother!

I would not recommend this novel to anyone not interested in Gothic literature and tracing its history.
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars 26 Oct. 2015
By Alex Edward Price - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book very graphic
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars As you read this book you'll feel like you're in a state of dreaming 22 May 2015
By Jenny Bragg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As you read this book you'll feel like you're in a state of dreaming. This novel is very fast-paced and at times difficult to comprehend. However, this novel gives us a glimpse of how 18th century Britain viewed orientalism and allows us to understand the contrast between British and Oriental values of the time.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback