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Various - The Twilight ZoneOST Box set, Soundtrack


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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Rod Open: Season 1 - Bernard Herrmann
  2. Main Title: First Season - Bernard Herrmann
  3. Where Is Everybody? - Bernard Herrmann
  4. End Title: First Season - Bernard Herrmann
  5. Prelude - Bernard Herrmann
  6. Signals - Bernard Herrmann
  7. Space Drift - Bernard Herrmann
  8. Space Stations - Bernard Herrmann
  9. Time Suspense - Bernard Herrmann
  10. Starlight - Bernard Herrmann
  11. Danger - Bernard Herrmann
  12. Moonscape - Bernard Herrmann
  13. Airlock - Bernard Herrmann
  14. Tycho - Bernard Herrmann
  15. The Earth - Bernard Herrmann
  16. Alternate Main Title #2 - Bernard Herrmann
  17. Walking Distance - Bernard Herrmann
  18. Alternte End Title #2 - Bernard Herrmann
  19. The Hitchhiker - Bernard Herrmann
  20. Alternate Main Title #3 - Bernard Herrmann
  21. The Lonely - Bernard Herrmann
  22. Alternate End Title #3 - Bernard Herrmann

Disc: 2

  1. Rod Open: Season 2 - Marius Constant
  2. Main Title: Second Season - Marius Constant
  3. Back There - Jerry Goldsmith
  4. The Big Tall Wish - Jerry Goldsmith
  5. The Invaders - Jerry Goldsmith
  6. Dust - Jerry Goldsmith
  7. Jazz Theme #1 - Jerry Goldsmith
  8. Jazz Theme #2 - Jerry Goldsmith
  9. Nervous Man In A $4.00 Room - Jerry Goldsmith
  10. End Title: Second Season - Marius Constant

Disc: 3

  1. Rod Open: Season 3 - Marius Constant
  2. Main Title: Second Season - Marius Constant
  3. Perchance to Dream - Nathan Van Cleave
  4. Elegy - Nathan Van Cleave
  5. Two - Nathan Van Cleave
  6. I Sing The Body Electric - Nathan Van Cleave
  7. A World Of Difference - Nathan Van Cleave
  8. A Stop Of Willoughby - Nathan Scott
  9. Jazz Theme #3 - Rene Garriguenc
  10. End Title: Second Season - Marius Constant

Disc: 4

  1. Rod Open: Season 4/5 - Marius Constant
  2. Main Title: Alternate - Marius Constant
  3. 100 Yards Over The Rim - Fred Steiner
  4. King 9 Will Not Return - Fred Steiner
  5. The Passerby - Fred Steiner
  6. When The Sky Was Opened - Leonard Roseman
  7. The Trouble With Templeton - Jeff Alexander
  8. Sixteen Millimeter Shrine - Franz Waxman
  9. End Title: Alternate - Marius Constant

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 11 reviews
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DO NOT LISTEN WHILE DRIVING OR WALKING ALONE AT NIGHT! 27 Jun. 2000
By YUSUF LAMONT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
About sixteen years ago I bought the original vinyl releases of this music (on Varese Sarabande) because some friends and I had landed a radio show in that would feature radio dramas and skits written by us that would desperately need scoring. I could never forget the haunting music I'd heard a million times while watching The Twilight Zone on television even through the archaic little 3-1/2 inch speaker on the old black and white Philco. After buying all five volumes auditioned them to mark them for mood, time, cues and such...but I soon realized that I was absoulutely enthralled by the music itself. It was so evocative, so distinct and well done that it inspired me to collect soundtracks in general, for work purposes as well as enjoyment. Imagine my dismay when I found most others could not measure up even with orchestras armed with three or four times the players! Years went by. The radio show continued. The Twilight Zone scores were magical. Nearly anything we tracked them to that matched the particular mood of a cut seemed to work PERFECTLY! Sometimes we'd make it a game, dropping the needle on a cut that fit the mood and damned if it didn't score out correctly, with pauses falling as needed. People called and asked who scored this piece or that one. We'd respond "Oh...Bernard Herrmann, Jerry Goldsmith and Nathan Van Cleave". We got lucky. Our radio work helped us to get into television as writers. We wondered what it must have been like for these composers when they made that leap decades before. And then...some time later...as is always the case with something you covet...I noticed one of my albums was missing. Traveling around with them finally caught up with me. I'd lost one. Volume five, I believe. Frantic, I checked every store in New York that would have it...new, used, collectors, but no dice. Out of print and out of luck. I turned my attention to the remaining four volumes. They were vinyl. They wouldn't last forever in spite of my babying and maintenance. And then I said, "Wait...perhaps the CD age would bring them all to me again in beautiful digital sound. Why worry?" The wait would be for years. When I thought I would finally have to go on e-bay, pay some ridiculous price for Vol. 5, then get the whole batch together, clean them up and burn them onto CD, the Varese CD came out...BUT IT WAS ONLY A BEST OF! ONE LOUSY CD! A TEASE! I e-mailed them "Are you going to put out the rest?" I heard back "Thank you for contacting us about our products, blah, blah, blah". I stopped looking. Until a friend at work saw the crummy Varese single disc on my desk and asked if I'd gotten the "boxed set". "Boxed set?" After I was revived, I went online and lo and behold, there it was! I listened to a sound sample...my God ! Here it was! Chock full of even more than the vinyls had. I ordered immediately. And in one of the rare occurences in American life, I got more than I bargained for! Stellar mastering and sound! The groupings by composer! Rod's openings! Truly informative liner notes. And of course...Bernard Herrmann and Jerry Goldsmith (Rivaled only in my mind by Ennio Morricone as film and TV composers) in easy to transport digital audio. I listened to them on the way home that night on the LIRR and their power remained. Was the next stop Jamaica station...or "gasp!", Willoughby? The walk home was even better! (or worse if you're a true scaredy-cat) The wind's usual tepid moan and the local mutt's howl merged with this music seemed to signal the coming apocalypse! If you are a fan of great music, and great soundtrack music, this collection is a must. Trust me, you've heard and *enjoyed this music and will enjoy it again. (*Did you know that SCTV used the two-note cue from Goldsmith's "Nervous Man In a $4.00 Room" as John Candy's "Dr. Tongue's" 3-D music cue? If they were hip enough to use Twilight Zone music, you know it's great stuff!)
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic.... 4 Mar. 2003
By William Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a phenomenal set...a dream come true for any fan of the series...The compositions are fantastic. Other reviewers have done a better job than I can at pointing out the subtleties of this collection...I just had to write this review to rebuke the mistaken reviewer who criticized the sound quality. The quality is more than adequate considering the source material and does not take away from this collection at all. If you are a fan of the series, this is a must have and a bargain to boot!
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DO NOT LISTEN WHILE DRIVING OR WALKING ALONE AT NIGHT! 27 Jun. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
About sixteen years ago I bought the original vinyl releases of this music (on Varese Sarabande) because some friends and I had landed a radio show in that would feature radio dramas and skits written by us that would desperately need scoring. I could never forget the haunting music I'd heard a million times while watching The Twilight Zone on television even through the archaic little 3-1/2 inch speaker on the old black and white Philco. After buying all five volumes auditioned them to mark them for mood, time, cues and such...but I soon realized that I was absoulutely enthralled by the music itself. It was so evocative, so distinct and well done that it inspired me to collect soundtracks in general, for work purposes as well as enjoyment. Imagine my dismay when I found most others could not measure up even with orchestras armed with three or four times the players! Years went by. The radio show continued. The Twilight Zone scores were magical. Nearly anything we tracked them to that matched the particular mood of a cut seemed to work PERFECTLY! Sometimes we'd make it a game, dropping the needle on a cut that fit the mood and damned if it didn't score out correctly, with pauses falling as needed. People called and asked who scored this piece or that one. We'd respond "Oh...Bernard Herrmann, Jerry Goldsmith and Nathan Van Cleave". We got lucky. Our radio work helped us to get into television as writers. We wondered what it must have been like for these composers when they made that leap decades before. And then...some time later...as is always the case with something you covet...I noticed one of my albums was missing. Traveling around with them finally caught up with me. I'd lost one. Volume five, I believe. Frantic, I checked every store in New York that would have it...new, used, collectors, but no dice. Out of print and out of luck. I turned my attention to the remaining four volumes. They were vinyl. They wouldn't last forever in spite of my babying and maintenance. And then I said, "Wait...perhaps the CD age would bring them all to me again in beautiful digital sound. Why worry?" The wait would be for years. When I thought I would finally have to go on e-bay, pay some ridiculous price for Vol. 5, then get the whole batch together, clean them up and burn them onto CD, the Varese CD came out...BUT IT WAS ONLY A BEST OF! ONE LOUSY CD! A TEASE! I e-mailed them "Are you going to put out the rest?" I heard back "Thank you for contacting us about our products, blah, blah, blah". I stopped looking. Until a friend at work saw the crummy Varese single disc on my desk and asked if I'd gotten the "boxed set". "Boxed set?" After I was revived, I went online and lo and behold, there it was! I listened to a sound sample...my God ! Here it was! Chock full of even more than the vinyls had. I ordered immediately. And in one of the rare occurences in American life, I got more than I bargained for! Stellar mastering and sound! The groupings by composer! Rod's openings! Truly informative liner notes. And of course...Bernard Herrmann and Jerry Goldsmith (Rivaled only in my mind by Ennio Morricone as film and TV composers) in easy to transport digital audio. I listened to them on the way home that night on the LIRR and their power remained. Was the next stop Jamaica station...or "gasp!", Willoughby? The walk home was even better! (or worse if you're a true scaredy-cat) The wind's usual tepid moan and the local mutt's howl merged with this music seemed to signal the coming apocalypse! If you are a fan of great music, and great soundtrack music, this collection is a must. Trust me, you've heard and *enjoyed this music and will enjoy it again. (*Did you know that SCTV used the two-note cue from Goldsmith's "Nervous Man In a $4.00 Room" as John Candy's "Dr. Tongue's" 3-D music cue? If they were hip enough to use Twilight Zone music, you know it's great stuff!)
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The cream of the crop straight from The Twilight Zone 21 Feb. 2000
By Barrett Reynolds - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This fantabulous collection has had me raving ever since I received it for Christmas. In this magnificent compilation, you'll hear Bernard Herrmann create the feeling a mysterious town that is quite normal, except that all of it's residents have mysteriously disappeared. You'll float through space and return again, you'll feel the ominous presence of a tenacious hitch-hiker, you'll be surrounding by miles of bleak, desolate desert on a secluded asteroid, and feel the yurning of a man wanting to return to the parks and merry-go-rounds of his past. And that's only the first disc! The total playing time of this collection is roughly 4 and a half hours, every minute of it being intense, heart-pounding, genuinely exciting scores by the best in the business. The entire second disc is dedicated to the show's contributions of the incomparable Jerry Goldsmith (Academy Award winner with his score for 1976's The Omen) And the second half of the collection is compiled of other great film and television composers. Nathan Van Cleave (One of the very first in his field to work predominantly in electronic music and synthesizers) is displayed beautifully with his deliciously-eerie, scrumptiously-crazy Perchance to Dream, and the happy, light-hearted romp I Sing the Body Electric. Don't just take my word for it! Buy it, it's a must!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tears of Joy 7 Aug. 2012
By Emma Richards - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am not generally an emotional person. I don't cry, or get hysterically excited. In fact, I pride myself on my cool rationality and ability to think logically. Therefore, the following admission is rather embarrassing for me; when "The Twilight Zone: 40th Anniversary Collection" arrived in the mail, my eyes filled with tears of joy. This surprised me, but perhaps not as much as it would have others, if anyone else had been around to see, because only I know how much "The Twilight Zone" has meant to me ever since I can remember. I won't go into that here, but I felt the same way when I got "The Twilight Zone: The Complete Definitive Edition" (best money I've ever spent).

So did this set live up to my expectations? Pretty much, yeah. One of my favorite things about TZ has always been the music; I've always maintained that The Twilight Zone represents some of the best music ever composed for television. This four-disc collection is an admirable collection of many of the original scores composed for TZ episodes. Also included are Bernard Herrmann's main and end themes for season one; Marius Constant's more famous (and better, in my opinion) main and end themes, used from season two onwards; and various cues used for multiple episodes throughout the show.

Disc 1 is entirely made up of Bernard Herrmann's compositions for the show. Featured are the scores for the episodes "Where is Everybody?," "Walking Distance," "The Hitch-Hiker" and "The Lonely," his main and end themes and the truly wonderful "Outer Space Suite," a collection of cues used for many different episodes ("Starlight" is probably my favorite track from the entire four-disc album; it really touches something deep inside me). Herrmann composed the scores for four other TZ episodes, "Eye of the Beholder," "Little Girl Lost," "Living Doll" and "Ninety Years without Slumbering," which aren't on this album, but which are included in the excellent two-disc CD "Bernard Herrmann: The Twilight Zone." Even without those four, this disc is fantastic, definitely the best of the four. "The Outer Space Suite," "Walking Distance" and "The Lonely" are particularly good. Total time: 73 minutes, 55 seconds.

Disc 2 is mostly composed of Jerry Goldsmith's scores, with the only non-Goldsmith contributions being Marius Constant's main and end themes. The episode scores included herein are "Back There," "The Big Tall Wish," "The Invaders," "Dust" and "Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room," and the cues are Jazz Themes 1 and 2. The highlights are the sublimely sinister "Back There," the dreamy "Big Tall Wish" and just plain cool "Jazz Theme 1" (one of my favorite jazz pieces ever). Total time: 71 minutes, 46 seconds.

Disc 3 contains scores from a variety of composers: in addition to Constant's themes and Rene Garriguenc's "Jazz Theme 3," there are the episode scores for "A Stop at Willoughby" by Nathan Scott and "Perchance to Dream," "Elegy," "Two," "I Sing the Body Electric" and "A World of Difference," all by Nathan Van Cleave. The best are the 19th century nostalgia of Scott's "A Stop at Willoughby" and Van Cleave's crazy "World of Difference" and "Perchance to Dream." Total time: 72 minutes, 11 seconds.

Disc 4 wraps the collection up with Constant's themes and six episode scores: "A Hundred Yards over the Rim," "King Nine will Not Return" and "The Passersby" by Fred Steiner, "And When the Sky was Opened" by Leonard Rosenman, "The Trouble with Templeton" by Jeff Alexander and "The Sixteen-Millimeter Shrine" by Franz Waxman. My favorites from this disc are Steiner's sad, beautiful "The Passersby," his slow, atmospheric "A Hundred Yards over the Rim" and Alexander's awesome, swingin' "Trouble with Templeton" (that swing portion in the middle has got to be one of the best swing pieces EVER). Total time: 73 minutes, 12 seconds.

All in all, this is a fantastic collection. My only beef with it is that so many great episode scores are left out. I know they couldn't fit every original score in, but Jeff Alexander's gorgeous, folksy score for "Come Wander with Me" (including the indescribably beautiful title song, composed for the episode and performed by actress Bonnie Beecher) and Nathan Van Cleave's haunting score for "Jess-Belle" (including the songs composed for it) definitely deserved a spot, as did his mellow and melancholy score for "The Midnight Sun." I would much rather have had those than "Jazz Theme 3," "King Nine will Not Return" and "I Sing the Body Electric." The score and song for "Come Wander with Me," especially, are too brilliant to never be released. A couple other quibbles are that "Rod Open: Season 1" uses the opening narration for season three instead of season one, and "End Title: Second Season" is on both discs three and four, but it's not really important.

5 stars with no reservations.
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