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Vanished Ocean by [Stow, Dorrik]
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Vanished Ocean Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Length: 312 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

'Vanished Ocean' is an ideal general reader for students and those who are already widely read in natural science. (Ted Nield, Geoscientist)

A wealth of nourishing knowledge revealed through the history of Tethyan Realm. (Ted Nield, Geoscientist)

'Vanished Ocean' is an ideal book for those who are already widely read in natural science. (Ted Nield, Literary Review)

A well argued contribution to one of the great scientific debates of the last 30 years. (Jonathan Beard, New Scientist)

About the Author

Dorrik Stow is ECOSSE Chair and Professor at Heriot-Watt University. He was previously Professor of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton. His main research interests are energy and environmental research for ECOSSE (Edinburgh Consortium for Subsurface Science and Engineering), past environmental change, and the role of geosciences for international development. He has published over 200 research publications and eight books including Encyclopedia of the Oceans (OUP, 2005).

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 8826 KB
  • Print Length: 312 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (27 May 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005PUWTZ4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #142,010 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is a rare find. An excellent read, written by an expert who avoids unecessary jargon but does not shy away from the level of detail needed to communicate the issues - a major fault of most "popular science" books. Where detail is needed, Stow takes the time to spell things out clearly and concisely. Some nice greyscale or line drawing illustrations are scattered through the book and serve the text well. The style is lucid and relaxed, with a good mix of personal backstory and anecdote that properly serve the substance rather than being merely thrown in to dilute the facts in case the reader cant handle them. Indeed these help to communicate Stow's enthusism and inspiration, as well as being a nice advert for a career in academic geology: there are even a few suggestions of nice food/wine combinations if you are ever visiting the sites Stow is discussing!

Stow anchors the book around the vanished ocean of Tethys, which gives the book shape, but this allows him to cover a huge range of material beyond the bare geology, including paleoclimatology, paleobiology and extinction theories, human evolution, marine sciences and critical discussion of pertinent scientific methods. These are all explained well and integrated into a wholistic view that he communicates superbly, drawing on personal and published data from sites ranging around the world, which he takes space to discuss and bring to life vividly. There is sufficient minor repetition in the different sections to prevent constant backflicking without being irritating. He is explicit about areas of uncertainty and controversy, and presents both sides.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this book intending it to be light relief from my geological studies and it proved an excellent way of 'seeing the wood for the trees' as the book covers, in an engaging way, the full history of the Tethys Ocean without getting too tied down in the complex detail.
Dorrik Stow is a well known sceptic about the KT boundary being due to a single event, and he makes his case within this book, but seems to carry that sceptism through to trying to prove that the indicators for the Chicxulub bolide were caused by other events which seems to me to be unnecessary as many geologists would believe the event did occur and was additive to the environmental stresses from other causes. That minor point aside the book is an excellent read from an author with great depth of knowledge and experience meaning that the complex mechanisms involved are covered accurately but without resort to the arcane language so beloved of many geological authors.
I suppose the book will be filed in stores under 'popular science' which is an impossibly wide target audience so my 4 stars is based on my own special interest; many general readers would find it worthy of 5 stars.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating story of breaking, moving and merging continents, and the consequences of these processes for the great but now-vanished Tethys Ocean. Dorrick Stow does an excellent job, not only telling the story but giving his readers enough background (plate tectonics & sedimentology, for examples) to ensure we can follow his narrative. He brings home how radically our world has changed since the Cambrian explosion, especially during and after the Mesozoic when Tethys had its day. Another strong thread is his account of the ecology of Tethys and how this can be interpreted from the sediments and fossils of the period. Inevitably this involves accounts of evolutionary diversification and extinction as global circumstances changed, and includes a salutary counter-argument to the view that the great KT extinction event was caused solely by a bolide-impact. (Interestingly, the authors of the chapter on dinosaur-extinction in "The Dinosauria" [Eds. Weishampel et al. 2004] agree to differ as to whether dinosaurs were already in decline before the end of the Cretaceous). One legacy of Tethys with modern economic implications is the series of great oilfields, and DS gives an illuminating picture of the Tethyan circumstances leading to their origin and geographical distribution. I liked DS's occasional personal anecdotes of his research trips and of key sites, which give some flavour of the foot-work needed to gather the evidence on which this whole story depends. Overall I enjoyed reading this book, and (more to the point) I learnt a lot and was enthused enough to read further. Thank you, Dorrick Stow.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I suppose that I might have read a few reviews before I bought this book. Geomorphology/Geology was one area of study in my degree in Geography (more years ago now than I care to recall) which I always enjoyed and since retiring I have taken the opportunity to bring myself up to date. I found this book very disappointing with far too little on process and physical evidence and far too much padding. I'm really not interested in a reiteration of the author's curriculum vitae nor his family life both of which are frequently referred to and add nothing to understanding the subject. The photo illustrations are very poorly reproduced and the line drawings of life forms are in a curious style.
The author was, in my opinion, very badly served by OUP as the hard cover edition I bought was poorly constructed. I'm not a spine-cracker but pages were already becoming semi-detached from this brand new copy even before I was half way through reading it.
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