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The Vampyre by [Holland, Tom]
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The Vampyre Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

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Length: 416 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

Review

A classical alternative to the traditional tale, Byron himself would have been pleased by such an eerie, erudite addition to his myth (TIME OUT)

Ingenious and entertaining (SUNDAY TIMES)

A powerfully atmospheric tale (COMPANY)

A tour de force of scholarship and gothicity (LOS ANGELES TIMES)

Book Description

* A novel of death, love and the agonies of immortality
* 'A damned good story' INDEPENDENT


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 747 KB
  • Print Length: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus (5 Jan. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0032TYQMO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #153,338 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 28 Dec. 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an amazing book - when I first saw it...I thought it would be just another vampire story - but never judge a book by its cover! The most memorable book I have ever read, it will make you laugh, cry, gasp and want more! It has gripped my interest both in gothicism and in Byron himself - both the man and the myth - and is surely a must for those who already find his story fascinating. It chronicles Lord Byron's life, travels and relationships with a twist - his transformation into a powerful vampire - or vampyre - by an evil Pasha, and the changes it brings about, both good and bad. Erotic yet terrible, this is a book you won't forget in a hurry - believe me when I say that words fail me, you must read it for yourself. A literary treat not to be missed - I look forward to reading more Tom Holland soon!
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Format: Paperback
A great Gothic novel, and indeed memorable. I read it ages ago, and recently found it rewarding to revisit (having read much more about and by Byron in the interim). An intriguing blend of fantasy and reality, with poignant episodes, mystery, horror, passion and drama. Very good characterization, both of sympathetic and villainous personalities. I am also fond of novels where the author demonstrates depth of historical knowledge. Holland's fictitious premise meshes so well with the real history that you almost wonder whether he might not have been on to something...
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Format: Paperback
George Gordon, better known as Lord Byron, is one of England's most famous 'Romantic' poets. He was born in 1788, the son of John Byron and Catherine Gordon, but inherited his title and property of his great-uncle in 1798. He travelled extensively throughout Europe and Asia Minor - his trips abroad included Albania, Greece and Italy - particularly when he was in trouble at home. (He piled up debts, his marriage collapsed after little over a year and caused a great deal of scandal with a series of illicit love affairs - his romantic entanglement with his half-sister, Augusta Leigh, was particularly noteworthy. In fact, it is believed that Augusta's daughter was fathered by Byron, rather than by her husband). After his marriage to Anne Milbanke failed, Byron left England in 1816. He settled in Geneva for a while - where he became friendly with Percy and Mary Shelley - before moving on to Italy. In 1824, he sailed to Greece to help in their fight for independence from the Ottoman Empire. However, Byron caught and died from a fever before seeing any action.

"The Vampyre" tells Byron's life story, though from a slightly different angle. Byron, as it turns out, never actually died and the book sees him telling his story to Rebecca Carville. He covers what he feels to be the key period of his existence, beginning with the trip to Greece where he became a vardoulacha - a vampire - and finishing with his faked death in Greece. Although the story is (obviously) embellished, Holland clearly had done his research before writing this book. It features Byron's most notable love affairs, his friendships with John Hobhouse and the Shellys, even the feeble contribution of his rather pitiful doctor, Polidor.
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By A Customer on 30 Jun. 2002
Format: Paperback
When I picked up The Vampyre a few years ago I couldn't believe my luck. Lord Byron as a vampire? It all makes sense and this is definitly the story Lord Byron would have choosen himself.
Tom Holland delivers a story that feels waterproof. Everything's there in history and it's all correct in time and mind. I love this book and I urge every Lord Byron fan out there to read this. I don't agree this should be placed in "horror" it feels more of "history".
Wonderful and very romantic.
The myth lives on...
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Format: Paperback
This is bad. Oh so bad! Lord Byron has a crash on maiden in distress by the name of Haidee and together they are trying to escape the big bad vampire, the Vardoulacha. They ride their horse and are chased by Haidee's family of vampires and her entire village of vampire zombies until finally they are caught and the poet is turned into a vampire. He then gets involved with the Makri sisters of the prominent Athenian family, who are here presented as concubines, turns his friend and personal physician John William Polidori into a vampire, kills his daughter Alegra, befriends other vampires in Italy, apparently most of his friends were vampires, discovers that Haidee had been a vampire all along, and lives unhappily ever after, occasionally drinking blood in modern day London. Oh I forgot Byron in modern times goes by the name of Ruthven from Polidori's Vampire, and the past events take place near the Greek river Acheron, that leads to the underworld.

In total, a complete mess! A little bit of Polidori, a little bit of Hobhouse's recollections, some references to Greek mythology that make no sense at all, some references to the Greek War of Independence without any historical accuracy whatsoever, a dash of romance, a little bad sex, some blood and a great deal of childish talk about freedom, all that horribly written, and to think that it includes some quotes from Byron's verse, what audacity!

Read Lord Byron! Read Polidory if you will! Read any book on vampires you can find, just don't read this one. The only good thing I can think of is that it is kind of interesting to read, just so you can see how far it will go and how bad it will get.
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