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Uri Geller: Magician or Mystic?: Biography of the controversial mind-reader by [Margolis, Jonathan]
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Uri Geller: Magician or Mystic?: Biography of the controversial mind-reader Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

Amazon Review

Margolis's biography of the alleged psychokineticist Uri Geller is that of a reluctant believer; Margolis stresses his credentials as a sceptic before admitting that he has become convinced that Geller is something more than a clever fake. We get a fairly standard account of Geller's troubled childhood and terrifying war experiences; there seem to be witnesses to there having been something odd about him when he was young, though nothing as specific as the bending of school spoons.

Margolis stresses the areas which others have found problematic--the friend and manager whom many have seen as his accomplice, the testing of his skills by a scientist with psychic obsessions of his own--and argues that they are less fishy than they seem. He is unimpressed by the usual sceptics; their impatience with his interest in Geller does seem in the circumstances tactless and ill mannered. What Margolis never quite answers, though, is the question of what point Geller's entire career has had; if he is a Messiah, or a delegate of powerful aliens, or the next step in evolution, none of it has mattered very much. This is a superior piece of journalism, which attractively conveys the author's entire perplexity. --Roz Kaveney

Book Description

The first serious, non-sensationalist biography of an extraordinary man. Is he a sham? Or is he a psychic genius and one of the wonders of the world?

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3092 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Apostrophe Books (12 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0073U14F0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #31,025 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Thoroughly enjoyed this book. There was a lot of publicity around Uri Geller in the late 60s early 70s and it all seemed to be about spoon bending. Was he a magician or was he a mystic (psychic)? To be honest he was not someone I took too seriously. When I mentioned this book, prior to buying, to my partner, it was dismissed with the wave of a hand and so I hesitated again. After reading this book I realize the publicity at the time detracted from the man and his ability. The number of physicists that have worked with Geller for two or three decades answers the question he must be a psychic. The research Margolis carried out i.e. the number of people he spoke to that have known and worked with Geller was impressive to say the least..
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Great stuff
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Format: Hardcover
It is sad that so many people say "It's great! buy it!" without actually saying WHY! I am weary of this work because I have been interested in this subject for a while. It is written fluently and it is interesting, but the author is deceptive. It is clear to me that Margolis is not the converted sceptic he claims to be. Margolis twists every quote and piece of information to suit his argument. Sceptics who have dealt in Parapsychology for a lot longer than Margolis are either ignored or dealt with in a disparaging, patronising tone. Of course Sceptical authors also fall in to this trap too, but eventually it is logical evidence that must tell, and Uri Geller fanatics can offer little. I would love Margolis to contact me and explain why Gellers countless failed soccer predictions (English soccer fans find him hilarious) his failure on a certain TV show, his promises to stop Big Ben (ridiculous? Of course. So why did he say it?) and his superb episode with the Brazilian cash ( ask someone) have been ignored or glossed over while his supposed achievements receive so much hype. As I have said before, I have nothing against strongly sceptical or pro arguments as long as the author is honest about his views. Margolis claims to be a converted sceptic. You will note that before we reach halfway in the book, Margolis mentions "a strong liking" of Uri. He also mentions that he went for a morning walk with him every day for so many months! Yet sceptics like Randi and Hutchinson get one visit each! The work of a converted sceptic? That is why I resent this work.
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Format: Paperback
Margolis has written an extremely compelling account of Uri Geller, from the point of view of a sceptic turned believer. Geller is a superb entertainer, no question, but, to all of you who think he has genuine powers, ask yourself "Why are they so useless?" Read James Randi's book "The Truth about Uri Geller" and make your own mind up!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Whatever your views of Mr Geller, and Margolis by his own admission is a sceptic, this incredibly well researched and engaging book makes for fascinating reading. As an investigative journalist, Margolis gives us a pretty comprehensive picture from both Geller's adherents and critics. And we get the author's own observations and experiences while writing the book. Once you get stuck into this one, you won't be able to put it down. Outstanding in every way. Would thoroughly recommend. Alex Pearl is author of 'Sleeping with the Blackbirds'
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An interesting read and I learned a lot about this enigmatic person. By the end I was more or less convinced that he really can use the power of thought to achieve strange phenomena but less sure about his belief that he is under the influence of aliens. What amazed me more were the parts of the book relating to the CIA's involvement with both testing his abilities and utilising them. I feel very intrigued by Uri and he comes across in the book as a warm and fascinating person albeit with a rather colourful past.
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Format: Hardcover
I felt that Margolis tried desperately to give the impression of even handedness in weighing the evidence, whilst in fact being all too ready to dismiss the overwhelming likelihood that metal bending is simply a conjuring trick. I found his arguments against sceptics weak in the extreme.
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Format: Paperback
Having always assumed that Uri Geller was a gifted fake, I am not so sure now. This book made me think. It is both intriguing and highly readable. Jonathan Margolis has researched his subject very well, and is infinitely more even-handed than James Randi has ever been. Margolis was originally a skeptic, but gradually over a period of 2 years of interviews, research and meetings with Uri and the people who know him, revised his opinion. This book is a monument of research with each page literally packed with interesting facts and information. The good the bad and the ugly are all presented and the language is intelligent and highly readable - there is no mindless capitalized ranting as found in other authors' books. Every detail is researched and verified. People who actually knew Uri and were present when apparently paranormal events took place, give their unvarnished opinions. While other authors simply rely on the "skeptic grapevine", repeating myths as facts without ever checking their authenticity, Margolis always goes direct to the source. Forget Randi, if you want a well-written and considered biography, buy this book.
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