• RRP: £40.00
  • You Save: £14.00 (35%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The Unseen: An Atlas of I... has been added to your Basket
+ £4.52 delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Publisher: Schilt Publishing 2016
Date of Publication: 2016
Binding: decorative boards
Edition:
Condition: Near Fine
Description: 264 pp, illustrated in colour.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 9 images

The Unseen: An Atlas of Infrared Plates Hardcover – 23 May 2016

3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
£26.00
£25.82 £20.00
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Only on Amazon: One product for every need Only on Amazon: New Releases


Product details

  • Hardcover: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Schilt Publishing; 01 edition (14 July 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9053308636
  • ISBN-13: 978-9053308639
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 2.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 542,737 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"What s perhaps most striking about this photo book is how diverse each chapter and series of photographs is not just in subject matter, but also in aesthetic it is easy to mistake the book for an anthology featuring the work of several photographers, when it is in fact one artist s triumphant homage to the medium of colour infrared film photography." --https://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2016/july/the-unseen-infrared-photographs-of-the-invisible/

The Unseen can be read as a work of visual science fiction, a critique of the Anthropocene, this era in which humans are the most significant influences on geologic changes on Earth. Apiaries and melting glaciers explore the effects that humans have had on biology and geology. The beekeepers look like astronauts on a foreign planet and the naked humans look like aliens. The nebulae and our internal organs provide a framing context. We humans are stranger than we know, and so is our world, when its unseen realities are revealed. Thompson s photography speculates a kind of time travel: the present is seen from an imagined past as an imagined future. The antiquarian appearance of the book with its Jules Verne epigram from Journey to the Centre of the Earth suggests that this is all something we might have imagined a hundred years ago as some horrific future. And yet, here we are. --http://www.fractionmagazine.com/the-unseen

"I've collected quite a few books of infrared photography and The Unseen is part of a tiny group specialising in false-colour infrared. It definitely deserves its place in a photographic library and in the history of the medium: whatever your reason for liking infrared photography, there will be images here to amaze you."
Andy Finney, Infrared100 --http://www.infrared100.org/2016/09/edward-thompson-unseen.html

From the Inside Flap

Inspired by the scientific uses of infrared film throughout history, The Unseen - An Atlas of Infrared Plates pushes the purposes and properties of the rarest photographic film on the planet to its scientific and conceptual limits. British documentary photographer, Edward Thompson, set out to explore the boundaries of perception, whether they were things outside our visual spectrum or events that went unnoticed or unreported. From researching the original Kodak advertisements, expert interviews and scientific journals, Thompson has gathered an extensive archive and used some of the last 46 dead-stock rolls ofKodak Aerochrome Infrared film in existence to reveal the unseen. The project comprises ten chapters: In The Red Forest (2012), infrared film is used to document the condition of the most radioactive forest in the world and in turn re-imagines the Ukraine in deep Soviet burgundy, something that has become eerily prophetic since 2012. In The Vein (2014), forgotten medical photography techniques are used to reveal the superficial veins beneath the skin. In The Flood (2012), one of the original purposes of the film, the documentation of crops post-flood via aerial photography, is ignored in favour of making portraits of families who have been affected on the ground. In The City (2014), infrared film is used to document one of the world's most polluted cities, London. In The War (2015), the film is used to photograph military paintings, simultaneously manipulating the film's historical military application of uncovering camouflage and also revealing hidden charcoal under-drawing. In The Village (2012), the film was used to attempt to document supernatural beings in the most haunted village in the U.K. There are no ghosts to be found. The photographs instead depict a 'sci-fi disruption of the green and pleasant lands of the garden of England' akin to H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds. Bees and beekeepers are documented in The Apiary (2015), Gross specimen photography in The Gross Specimen (2015) and Astrophotography in The Past (2015). The final chapter is yet to be revealed. Thompson has created a swan song to the medium of infrared photography, of which this book itself has also become an artefact, a part of its history.

See all Product description

2 customer reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Review this product

Share your thoughts with other customers

Showing 1-3 of 2 reviews

7 March 2017
Format: Hardcover
One person found this helpful
Comment Report abuse
10 October 2017
Format: Hardcover
2 people found this helpful
Comment Report abuse
1 November 2017
Format: Hardcover
One person found this helpful
Comment Report abuse

Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 reviews
Amazo
5.0 out of 5 starsEdward took an amazing journey with these last
25 July 2018 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?