Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £8.99

Save £1.00 (10%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Unnamable by [Beckett, Samuel]
Kindle App Ad

The Unnamable Kindle Edition

2.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£8.99

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Book Description

The Unnamable by Samuel Beckett, in a new edition of the classic novel, published for the first time by Faber with an introduction by Beckett scholar Steven Connor.

About the Author

Samuel Beckett was born in Dublin in 1906 and graduated from Trinity College. He settled in Paris in 1937, after travels in Germany and periods of residence in London and Dublin. He remained in France during the Second World War and was active in the French Resistance. From the spring of 1946 his plays, novels, short fiction, poetry and criticism were largely written in French. With the production of En attendant Godot in Paris in 1953, Beckett's work began to achieve widespread recognition. During his subsequent career as a playwright and novelist in both French and English he redefined the possibilities of prose fiction and writing for the theatre. Samuel Beckett won the Prix Formentor in 1961 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1969. He died in Paris in December 1989.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 418 KB
  • Print Length: 177 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0571244645
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (4 Oct. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009YM5FOG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #154,971 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Self-indulgent, interminable bilge, I'm afraid. It's a shame because I highly rated 'Molloy' and 'Malone Dies', the predecessors in the trilogy. But with this one Beckett literally loses the plot. There's barely a character in sight just this vague, 'unnameable' presence, a blot on the whole book, whinging and repeating and contradicting and eating itself up.

Presumably Beckett felt he'd done enough in the first two novels to completely deconstruct the art form in a sort of pseudo-philosophical rant about nothing. I gave it a couple of stars for the torso and head shoved in a jar outside the chop-house. A darkly comic momentary return to form.
1 Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Once read, Beckett's most daring and uncompromising novel stays in the mind forever. The experience is all the more overwhelming and incandescent if you read "Molloy" and "Malone Dies" first - otherwise it's like skipping most of the New Testament and going straight to the crucifixion, a la Mel Gibson. Unfortunately, Beckett's new UK home of Faber and Faber doesn't seem able to produce an edition that passes muster - these books are boring to look at, typo-ridden, so poorly bound they fall apart in your hands (useless for prolonged study), and in the present case, not so much Unnameable as unreadable: the copy we received got to page 26 and then jumped to pages 59-74 before returning to page 43, pages 27-42 having been simply omitted. "Where now? Who now? When now?" are questions anyone who cares about Beckett ought to be asking faced with such neglect and incompetence.
1 Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
While the physical quality of the book leaves a lot to be desired, the weight of Beckett's prose remains an uncompromising and destabilising force.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover