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Unicorn Road Audio Download – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 7 hours and 29 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughon
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 19 April 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007W37BZA

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I have just used the 'Look Inside' feature to remind myself of the opening line, which I always quote as my favourite ever, and cannot believe that this wonderful epic tale has only 9 reviews. It deserves a huge readership. I am not a big writer of reviews - I think they take a skill that I don't have - but I felt compelled to add a few words. When you talk of winning hook lines, don't give me A Catcher in the Rye, don't quote Dickens at me: give me 'To lose a small boy in a world so wide is an easy thing.'Davies is a master of setting the scene. He is also a master of simple language. This is from my blog in 2009 'Perfect, and no word of more than one syllable. It isn't necessary to have the reader reaching for a dictionary to convey meaning. Small boy. World so wide. Easy thing. Without use of the word 'relationship,' we understand there is a deep connection between narrator and boy. Without using the word 'perspective,' we understand the insignificance of one person alone in the world, but of his significance to the narrator. 'Small' tells us the boy is vulnerable and may be in danger: that he must be found. There are hints of a journey to be undertaken. To test the sentence further, try supplementing words with similar meanings: 'Little' instead of 'small'; 'simple' instead of 'easy.' Change the order of play ('It is an easy thing to lose a small boy in a world so wide') and all sense of poetry is lost.' In The Conjourer's Bird, Davies proved that he could write a love story. This, too, is a love story - the love a father has for his son and the lengths he will go to to find him at a time when there was no multi-media, no planes; when travel was long and hard, but Davies will be your guide. Heart-breaking and brave, this is a book that stayed with me long after I turned the last page. Buy it!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Just surfing through Amazon one day I was attracted to he title of this book, and I so wasn't dissappointed. Although as amodern reader you know that the search for the 'Unicorn' is going to be futile the story that unfolds with the father looking for his son who was the apprentice that set off on the 'Unicorn Road' his sad acceptance that he may never see his son again. The other characters that swirl around the tale allgive it a feeling of intimacy and mystery as if you are there between the pages . Further in the book when the secret language of women is described it just makes your imagination swell and you become so totally engrossed in the translators tale that you can't wait to get to the next page.
I'm not going to spoil the end but it is surprising. sad emotional and uplifting all in one go. It's a small book would fit into any luggage and make perfect holiday reading, but cover yourself in suncream first because I can guarantee once you get into the story you'll forgett to do anything else and get burned to a crisp!!!!!!!
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Format: Audio Download Verified Purchase
I found this to be a beautifully written, understated tale of hope, loss and language. The pace of the plot isn't action, action, action but a lot is covered and it stays with you. Lovey language & beautiful story well told.
A group of people travel to the Emperors court from different areas of Europe and Asia - a menacing general with a secret, a young boy, an interpreter, and a girl travelling to marry her beloved. The story unfolds as an old man is trying to discover what has happened to his son who was one of this party.
The story, which I got as an audio book, stayed with me for a long time afterward and I'm looking forward to others by this author.
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Format: Paperback
What a truly wonderful book - lyrical writing that draws you into a time and places that have for long been blurred in the history of Medieval Europe and the East. In the shadoes is the Emperor Frederick II, Stupor Mundi, who loved knowledge and science and earned the undying enmity of the papacy. This love of knowledge and his father's bestiary seems to be the link to Manfred, who entrusts a scholar with obtaining rare and exotic animals to hopefully buy off the Pope who is encouraging Charles of Anjou to challenge Manfred's right to rule.

On the other side of the known world a young woman is starting a journey of her own.

It is inevitable that the stories will meet somewhere along the way, but what a magical journey you are taken along on the way. The party who accompany the scholar to the East are a mixed bunch; motives are unclear, outcomes murky. And the boy who accompanies them watches as his life is taken more and more beyond his control. The writing of this story is interesting; the boy Benedict, who is integral to many of the characters in the story and certainly the motivation of his father back in Europe, is referred to mainly as "the boy" as if his anonymity to many of the people he is travelling with extends to his name and identity, and the lack of interest they show in his impinging even more on their lives. A group of people who are not all that they seem.

I like the way the writing ranges from the personal to the impersonal; from the deepest thoughts of one character, to the actions of another characters whose motives we cannot at the time see. Highly recommended.
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