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An Unhallowed Grave: Number 3 in series (Wesley Peterson) by [Ellis, Kate]
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An Unhallowed Grave: Number 3 in series (Wesley Peterson) Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
Book 3 of 20 in Wesley Peterson (20 Book Series)

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Length: 319 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Besides providing a clever dual mystery, Ellis humanizes her characters. . . . This is a series that just gets stronger with each new book." "Publishers Weekly""

"A beguiling author who interweaves past and present . . . works well on both levels." "Times""

Book Description

The third Wesley Peterson Crime novel by Piatkus favourite Kate Ellis

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 649 KB
  • Print Length: 319 pages
  • Publisher: Piatkus; Reprint edition (6 Jan. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004KSRVE6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #14,570 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Aug. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Pauline Brent is found hanged from a tree in a churchyard. What first seems like suicide soon turns into a murder investigation for DS Wesley Peterson and DI Gerry Heffernan. Wesley's friend, archaeologist Neil Watson, discovers the skeleton of a young woman who seems to have suffered the same fate centuries ago. Could there be some sort of connection between the two?

There are plenty of people with secrets to hide in the area and it starts to seem as though nearly everyone is a possible suspect. The police cannot find anything out about Pauline Brent and this makes their case even harder to solve. Then a young man who may have seen something on the night of the murder disappears and the police are even more puzzled.

I enjoyed this story with its many strands both past and present. The series characters are developing well and it is really enjoyable to find police personnel who get on with and support each other rather than constantly trying to do each other down. There are a few niggles between them to stop it being too cloying but the relationships seem to bear more resemblance to real life than many crime novels do.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Kate Ellis has developed an interesting and well characterised series and I will certainly be continuing. However 'Tardmouth' is a toe curlingly irritating anagram of you-know-where. I wonder if she regrets it now, and wishes she'd chosen a different name!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Kate Ellis is one of the authors I read,the problem is because she is good her books tend to be dear.So this time I decided to buy second hand.
The book is in such good condition that I will purchase used books again.An excellent read from start to finish.
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Format: Paperback
Kate has done it again and kept us rivated to the last page. This has to be the best so far with the stories growing in strength with each new book. Very entertaining.
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Format: Paperback
When I'm reading a book and find myself muttering things like, "Why didn't they ask..."? or "Why don't they...?" that doesn't bode well for that book. Unfortunately, this novel kept me muttering throughout. This is classified as a police procedural, so why didn't these policemen use every advantage they had to solve this case? Granted, if they had it would have been a rather short story unless the author had some other bright ideas up her sleeve.

Detective Inspector Gerry Hefferman and Detective Sergeant Wesley Peterson of the Tradmouth Police are called to the village of Stokeworthy to investigate the death by hanging of a local woman. Pauline Brent was found in the churchyard hanging from a yew tree commonly called the hanging tree because of a local legend of a woman who was hanged there in the 1470's and buried in an unhallowed grave. The modern day story is told while in an uncanny parallel with the other story in regards to who was killed, what the crime of the accused murder was, and how justice was carried out. Rather quickly in the investigation the police find that they can't come up with any background for Pauline Brent and that causes their investigation to come to a grinding halt. This is where my dissatisfaction with this book really began to show itself. This story takes place in 1999, forensic science was available to utilize fingerprints taken from a deceased person. Why in the world did this group of police investigators NEVER take the fingerprints of this victim? It seems to be such a natural path for their investigations to have taken. That one thing would have solved their major mystery and the fact that none of the officers involved ever thought of that method of identifying this woman is ludicrous.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good detective novel. Characters well developed and a very human element which would appeal to all.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book. As always Kates style is keeping the reader interested and suspense to the end. The characters are interesting with personality which is excellent. I do like the wesley Peterson series. Gerry Heffernan reminds me of my old Boss.
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By L. J. Roberts TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Sept. 2010
Format: Hardcover
First Sentence: The girl looked out of the window.

Pauline Brent, a nice middle-aged lady about whom no-one speaks badly, is receptionist to the local doctor. She is also found hanged from a tree in the churchyard. A local archeological dig turns up a 500-year-old skeleton of a woman who was also hanged. Can clues from one case help solve the other?

I know; it's an older book. Being one who prefers to read a series in order, I finally found this third book in the Wesley Peterson series.

That said, I feel their being touted as "A Wesley Peterson Crime Novel" is something of a misnomer. To me, Ellis has created very much of an ensemble cast with my personal favorite being DI Gerry Heffernan, Wesley's boss with his wisdom and humor.

Ellis has done such of good job of making her characters real, I feel invested in their lives almost as if I were watching a series--who will find a girlfriend, who will get promoted, will a certain marriage last--because the characters' lives progress with each book. It's not an easy trick for an author to manage.

The reason the books marketing of the books is focused on Wesley is that he is the link to the second thread in the stories, which is the archeological and historical mystery. I am fascinated by English history and cannot imagine the thrill of discovering something hundreds of years old. Ellis conveys that excitement to the reader, educating and skillfully linking the present and the past. Occasionally, she I feel it unlikely a character wouldn't know a bit of information being related, but it's necessary to the story that the reader understand.

The dialogue could have been better. It's not bad, but it doesn't completely flow. The plot was constructed with an unexpected revelation.
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