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Uncertain Futures: An Assessment Of The Conditions Of The Present by [Berger, Edmund]
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Uncertain Futures: An Assessment Of The Conditions Of The Present Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 169 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Edmund Berger is an independent writer, researcher, and activist living in Louisville, Kentucky. His primary focuses are on the evolution of technology and its impact on changing modes of capitalist production, the role of warfare in the economy, and the history of the avant-gardes as critiques and responses to paradigms of power.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 777 KB
  • Print Length: 169 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1785355007
  • Publisher: Zero Books (24 Feb. 2017)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01MYBDGW5
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #358,334 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
This book covers the world economic crisis in 2007.
He puts forward some compelling theories and reasons why it happened.
His assessment of Marxism is interesting too.
His history of the beginning of Capitalism is fascinating, but it all comes down to greed by the bankers, other people and institutions.
Iceland went another way by closing down the banks. Today the country is thriving after going through hard, difficult times. The world didn't end for them.
I can't see why other countries didn't do the same.
Unfortunately the financial sector has tentacles which spread to all areas of governments in many countries, especially US and UK.
The US frighteningly has players from the big banks in charge now.
Will they learn from the past - I hope so.
Recommended.
I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher John Hunt publishing via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 0.0 out of 5 stars 0 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars What would Marx say? 21 Feb. 2017
By David Wineberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Put two economists in the same room and you will understand why Congress never works. Put a book together with economists’ views on neoliberalism and socialism, and you get a bickering collection of angles and aspects, all of which can be disputed.

Uncertain Futures is a title that captures this ethos well. It consists of three chapters, roughly past present and future. The future is of the one of most interest, and is therefore the most disappointing. Berger is very cautious, maybe because he himself has just demonstrated the potential of instant criticism, or maybe because he is uncertain himself. Or both. But his final recommendation is to create support networks around the world. Put the 99% in touch, with co-operatives, unions and movements. This will raise the profile of socialism as viable, and provide a concrete answer to the precarity that neoliberalism has entrenched. Sounds like a very long term plan.

The race to the bottom should now be obvious to everyone. Fascism, an inherent if not necessary component of capitalism, has been dramatically rising in numerous democracies. It absolutely must, as the 99% looks for a savior from their absurd position and condition. Yet the fear it plays on helps cement the status quo, because fascists are dictators protecting their gains. Berger says “Fascism is nothing less than the intensification of every regressive sentiment to be found in the whole of society, mobilized and put on the march by elements in the ruling class.” And “To reform capitalism at this stage is a revolutionary act.” That’s how far we’ve fallen.

David Wineberg
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