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Unborn But Forgotten [DVD] [2002]

1.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Jun-ho Jeong, Seong-yong Kye, Kan-Hie Lee, So-yeon Lee, Ji-yeon Myeong
  • Directors: Chang-jae Lim
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Korean
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Tartan
  • DVD Release Date: 4 Dec. 2006
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 1.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000HN32HI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 100,984 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Korean Ring-like horror suspense film based on a cursed website. A website is apparently killing every female visitor within 15 days of their viewing it. A female reporter begins an investigation that leads to the discovery of the site known only as 'The White Room'. Uncovering the secret has its price, leaving her only 15 days to solve the mystery behind the cryptic portal and break the curse.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I bought this because it was fairly cheap, also because I enjoy owning the Tartan film range, I have to admit I was very disappointed with the film. I can't say that it was scary or anything, and since the main lead from 'Marrying the Mafia' I was expecting some kind of humour/comedy through out. Of course it this wasn't the case. I just wasn't too captivated by the story, or the performances, or even the music- Korean films normally have incredibly emotional and stirring classical music socres that help to create pathos and atmosphere, just look at 'A Tale of Two Sisters'. 'Unborn But Forgotten' didn't do anything for me what so ever. Not to say all Korean horror films are this way, they've made some great thrillers and horror films- I really enjoyed 'Into the Mirror', 'The Uninvited' was an incredible film as well. I suggest trying those instead of 'Unborn But Forgotten'.
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By Siriam TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Dec. 2012
Format: DVD
The problem with Asian horror is that not all the reference points are understood or picked up on by Western viewers and while it is inevitable that prior Asian films are referenced, the influence of non-Asian movies should also not be ignored. A simple example in this case is the concept of abortions in certain Asian societies where the onus on the woman to clear the problem and the erecting of graves for such unborn foetuses occur, and becomes a central motif in this film. The structure of the film script as another reviewer has observed leaves a lot to be desired but the simple suspense effects and the acting especially of Eun-je Lee in the lead female role (who sadly committed suicide four years later) are sufficient to make it worthy of more than passing interest.

Rather than cross referencing with other films (especially the predecessor Asian horror films given the sheer volume of output of the genre across several Asian countries that exists) I would suggest that each movie is best initially judged based on a stand alone basis. This movies final third is the big let down but the lead up and the pushing of what might be happening is handled effectively enough to merit watching. My Thai wife and I certainly enjoyed the plot shifts even if some of the male acting left a lot to be desired at times. Interesting but not essential viewing would be my summary.

The "on the set" featurette extra included is worthy of more than passing interest I would suggest because as a candid camera type observation of the shooting of easily identified scenes in the movie, it underlines how demanding such film shoots are for the actors in maintaining focus and also how basic the set and effects can be, plus the director having a very clear picture of what he is after including use of storyboards is very key.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 31 Dec. 2005
Format: DVD
Sometimes it really does seem like there are no original ideas. "Unborn But Forgotten" is prime proof of that, a movie so crammed with cliches and ripoffs that it seems like a spoof.

Ever since the arrival of hit Japanese film "Ringu" and its solid remakes and sequels, there have been some truly lame ripoffs -- "Phone," for one, and the American cluck-clucker "Feardotcom." But "Unborn But Forgotten" takes that lameness and runs off into the distance with it.

Su-Jin (Eun-joo Lee) is a determined young journalist, with a peculiar mystery to investigate: women have been dying of bizarre physiological causes, apparently linked to ultra-fast pregnancies, even though none of them were pregnant before. The only link is a website called The White Room, which will kill you after fifteen days.

Of course, Su-Jin (who is already pregnant by her moody boyfriend) goes to the site. And having doomed herself, she begins searching for the origins of this cursed site. She finds out that it is due to a vengeful ghost (not another one!) who lost her child, and is apparently using the site to produce ghost babies.

Sound familiar? Just insert the word "tape" instead of "website," and "seven" instead of "fifteen," and you've got "Ringu."

It may seem like a new twist to have the pregnancy angle, but to anyone who has seen Hideo Nakata's "Rasen" -- the sequel to "Ringu" -- the pregnancy angle will seem all too familiar. Well, at least they found new aspects of the Ring Curse to rip off, rather than mere death.

Using a similar storyline isn't necessarily a death knell, but the slipshod script and lackluster acting seal the movie's fate.
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa152dec4) out of 5 stars 14 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa23eede0) out of 5 stars No Where close to the ring.... But far from general horror. 9 April 2006
By William Sibick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Korea always surprises me with their films. This one is no different. More of a thriller or mystery than a horror film, Unborn But Forgotten is a predictable tale that although had gained little respect is worth a look for those in love with Korean film. It stands on it's own however the dialoge and the pace could have been up tempo a bit more.

The story is about a website that when people visit, strangely they die shortly later. Although this is similar to the ring the plot thickens because it's not random. There is a purpose to the killings that exists in the clues of the relationship and artwork surrounding the supersitious happening.

The film is worth viewing and is definately worth the used price here on amazon. If you love Korean film and want to add this to your collection I would suggest it. For Fans of "The Eye 2" or anyone who finds it interesting to see parenthood and the supernatural combined, I would say this is a must. Thriller/mystery is not much my thing but in the this vein it was very good. Not for those looking for horror.

Quality was outstanding as Tartan always provides.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1d9b6b4) out of 5 stars Emphasis on "forgotten". 21 Sept. 2007
By Robert Beveridge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Unborn but Forgotten (Chang-jae Lim, 2002)

I am an unabashed fangeek when it comes to Asian horror films. The Far East have been putting paid to cocky Americans in the horror film arena for almost a quarter-century now; even during the last golden age of American horror, the Japanese were kicking our tails. (Those who think that "torture porn" is a "new trend" might want to go back and revisit the first two Guinea Pig films directed by Hideshi Hino or T. F. Mous' Men Behind the Sun, all of which are over two decades old.) Now, when the American horror industry is consumed with bland remakes and adaptations of video games, it seems we've pretty much ceded the field to such Eastern auteurs as Takashi Miike, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, the Pang Brothers, Hideo Nakata, etc. etc. ad nauseam. Because we see so many excellent horror films from Asia, I'm always a bit surprised when I see one that's mediocre. (I've seen very few that are outright bad.) Unborn but Forgotten is one of those movies that helps me remember that not every horror flick to come from Region 3 is great-- or, for that matter, even good.

The plot will likely sound very familiar to anyone who's seen three or four horror movies in the past decade: women who visit a certain website die fifteen days later. Plucky Young Journalist(TM) visits site for research, is cursed, and must discover how to unlock the curse before she dies.

Yes, it's Ring all over again, but without any of that movie's atmosphere, presence, excellent acting, or creepy cinematography. This was Lim's first film; in the ensuing five years, he has not made a second. That alone should tell you something. I'm giving it two stars because, while it's not good, it's not bad, either; it's just kind of there. A forgettable way to kill two hours. **
17 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1be85dc) out of 5 stars Should have been aborted 20 Oct. 2005
By EA Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Sometimes it really does seem like there are no original ideas. "Unborn But Forgotten" is prime proof of that, a movie so crammed with cliches and ripoffs that it seems like a spoof.

Ever since the arrival of hit Japanese film "Ringu" and its solid remakes and sequels, there have been some truly lame ripoffs -- "Phone," for one, and the American cluck-clucker "Feardotcom." But "Unborn But Forgotten" takes that lameness and runs off into the distance with it.

Su-Jin (Eun-joo Lee) is a determined young journalist, with a peculiar mystery to investigate: women have been dying of bizarre physiological causes, apparently linked to ultra-fast pregnancies, even though none of them were pregnant before. The only link is a website called The White Room, which will kill you after fifteen days.

Of course, Su-Jin (who is already pregnant by her moody boyfriend) goes to the site. And having doomed herself, she begins searching for the origins of this cursed site. She finds out that it is due to a vengeful ghost (not another one!) who lost her child, and is apparently using the site to produce ghost babies.

Sound familiar? Just insert the word "tape" instead of "website," and "seven" instead of "fifteen," and you've got "Ringu."

It may seem like a new twist to have the pregnancy angle, but to anyone who has seen Hideo Nakata's "Rasen" -- the sequel to "Ringu" -- the pregnancy angle will seem all too familiar. Well, at least they found new aspects of the Ring Curse to rip off, rather than mere death.

Using a similar storyline isn't necessarily a death knell, but the slipshod script and lackluster acting seal the movie's fate. Director Chang-jae Lim is either inept or discouraged by the turkiness of this film, and so doesn't bother anything other than "boo!" scares. Subtle spookery can turn even a clunker into something interesting, but Lim seems too bored to manage it.

Screenwriter Hyeon-geun Han is definitely inept, leaving all the wrong plot threads dangling. How does a ghost start a site? WHY a site? Why is she mad? What's the point of what she's doing? And why the heck is the human murderer revealed so early, when he could have provided plenty of suspense? Don't expect any of it to make sense.

There are a few subplots that are interesting to us -- for example, the boyfriend finding that the pregnant Su-Jin might cripple his career, and how he responds to it. But such character-building is swept to the wayside. Instead, we get the occasional creepy moment (Su-Jin watching herself die), smothered in dull spookiness and incredibly obvious plotting.

With some decent acting but a terrible and derivative storyline, "Unborn But Forgotten" deserves to be forgotten.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1b91ea0) out of 5 stars It was not what I expected it to be. 6 Oct. 2006
By Avidfan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Okay I would like to let the reviewer below me know (THE FIDDLER) that I think it only his DVD that had that problem because my movie is in 1:85 anomorphic Widescreen and it also worked in my Widescreen TV just fine. And yes my DVD is from Tartan and I have had it for almost a year. But as for the movie it really let me down because as I saw this I felt like I was watching fear dot com again That movie sucked also by the way. but the victims were only women. This movie only gets 3 stars from me out of respect for Lee Eun-JOO the lead actress of the film. I love the movies she has done but I recently found out that she died in 2005 (Suicide). So if you think that this film stinks I am with you but this is my way of paying respect to a beautiful women whose talent was wasted a year ago.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa2603b7c) out of 5 stars Multi-Layered And Original Horror-Tragedy 28 Dec. 2007
By Stephen B. O'Blenis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
A very polished, well-made and subtly spooky movie, "Unborn But Forgotten" is on the slow side (sometimes Too slow, admittedly), and highly demanding of close attention to really 'get', even by Asian standards, where atmosphere and complex plot structures are very common. But it rewards with a psychologically and emotionally engaging tale, one that really affects and chills. The 'killer website' idea had become well established even before this was made in 2003, but in Unborn But Forgotten it's visitors to the website of an abortion clinic who are meeting their end within fifteen days of their log-on to the site. In a scenario similar to The Ring/Ringu, the movie's protagonist comes upon the curse by accident, while investigating deaths that she had thought were unrelated, and has to sift through a web of secrets and otherworldiness to solve the puzzle of the curse before she becomes another victim.

Themes of regret, redemption, compassion and loneliness are woven throughout, and a figure central to the movie, who emerges in the latter sections, is one of the most tragic entities to ever appear in film. Unusually bold in its handling of the final third of its going, Unborn But Forgotten doesn't pull itself back just to avoid being politically incorrect.

**WARNING: POSSIBLE SEMI-SPOILERS AHEAD**

There's no question that some viewers will be offended at the angle from which this looks at the whole idea of abortion. While it avoids depicting either the staff or the clients of the clinic as one-dimensional or deliberately cruel, the movie, well, I might as well just say it, sympathizes with the aborted. Which of course is quite taboo nowadays. And while the title alone will probably have given most a good idea of where it's leading up to on its path of secrets, it's not a straight-forward, cut-and-dried, 'revenge' movie. It's quite emotional, and the motivations behind some of the characters are genuinely surprising. Dark, tragic on multiple levels, and yet with glimmers of something else. The finale is unique and memorable, and the movie as a whole, even with the 'killer website' angle, can be said to be quite unlike anything else out there. Recommended.
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