FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Unapologetic: Why, despit... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Near fine condition, slight wear only, shipped directly from an Amazon Fulfilment Centre.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Unapologetic: Why, despite everything, Christianity can still make surprising emotional sense Paperback – 7 Mar 2013

4.1 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£8.99
£3.03 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£8.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Unapologetic: Why, despite everything, Christianity can still make surprising emotional sense
  • +
  • How to be a Bad Christian: ... And a better human being
Total price: £17.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (7 Mar. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571225225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571225224
  • Product Dimensions: 12.6 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (131 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 11,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A unique book, cutting its way ruthlessly through thickets of both religious and anti-religious sentimentality; painfully funny at points, always impassioned and never glib. (Rowan Williams, Master, Magdalene College, Cambridge University and former Archbishop of Canterbury)

Spufford has the great virtue of making the reader want to argue with him, while simultaneously yearning to hear more. (Daily Telegraph)

Remarkable, passionate, challenging and tumultuously articulate book ... this is Spufford's most fascinating book. (Our Choice, Sunday Times)

An interesting additional to the religious cannon ... a refreshing approach, which makes the book far more palatable than the nearly hysterical polemics we have come to expect from both sides. Spufford writes well, and his rationality shines through here. (Sunday Business Post)

Book Description

Unapologetic is a brief, witty, personal, sharp-tongued defence of Christianity by Francis Spufford, taking on Dawkins' The God Delusion and Christopher Hitchens' God is Not Great.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
So, just what the world needs, another book in the ongoing faith vs. atheist war of words. Except this isn't. Several people will be wrong-footed by seeing Francis Spufford's name attached to a book supporting Christianity. As one of the UK's most erudite writers of `factual' fiction and most respected reviewers of science fiction it will come as a shock to find he has published a book which brings to bear his full powers of argument in favour of Christian belief.

However, 'Unapologetic' is not a case for the defence, indeed it's almost the opposite, it's a deeply personal exposition on the effect that Christian belief has had on Spufford at an emotional level. Quite rightly he has not sought to provide proof or evidence for the existence of God, it is simply a report from inside the mind (and possible soul) of a believer and the writer is fully aware of what this means in the context of his previous work.

Francis Spufford is no fool; his previous works are the result of meticulous research, feverish enthusiasm and a precision in writing that is a joy to read. Whether he is getting inside the minds of polar explorers or imagining the possibility of how the Soviet economic dream might have worked, he is never short on detail, wit and supporting knowledge. 'Unapologetic' is different insomuch as it appears to be written `from the heart' and as such it feels a little like the follow up to 'The Child That Books Built'. Whereas that book explored the constructs created from the borrowed world view of authors this book concerns itself with the personal effect of faith and more importantly the effects on ourselves of our self-awareness when we fail and let others down.
Read more ›
3 Comments 143 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have a habit of marking passages in books, with a pencil line running down the margin at the side of words I want to refer back to. Many of my books have a few such markings, and some have many. Occasionally a book comes along in which this habit soon becomes pointless, as every paragraph of every page is worth remembering. 'Unapologetic' is one such book.

I read a fair amount of books about religion, some serious theology, some more devotional spiritual literature; this is neither, and I wish there was much more literature like it. If your tired of the dryness of much theology and the gentility of much Christian spirituality, then this is for you. A real breath of fresh air in the God debate, something that doesn't seem possible I know, but Spufford has done it. It is, first and foremost, a truly passionate book about Spufford's religious life and convictions. He offers no easy solutions to the basic theological riddles Christians have to live with, and in fact spends several pages pretty much demolishing the very idea of theodicy - and what a relief it is too, to find a Christian author who actually doesn't want us to swallow the excuses theologians make for God. This book might actually challenge some Christians as much as it does non-believers, in a good and necessary way. No, this is something else; an unblinking, completely honest, head-on look at what it is that Christianity really means for us, as emotional human beings, rather than as walking intellects.

Some more sensitive souls might be put off by Spufford's strong language and imagery. This would be a great shame, as the book also contains some passages of great lyrical beauty, one of which is quite simply the best description I have ever read of what prayer is actually like.
Read more ›
2 Comments 97 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Frances Stott TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 20 Jan. 2013
Format: Hardcover
At least one reviewer has complained that this books is "unresearched" (as the author says), but for me, this was part of its strength; it is one man's experience, told, as it were, from the inside. The author doesn't try to "prove" his point, but describes how he has come to arrive at the faith he holds, and why. He doesn't preach, or persuade; he tells it is it is, leaving the reader to draw his or her own conclusions. And what this amounts to is, paradoxically, a very persuasive account of the Christian faith.

Spufford does make short work of prominent atheists, such as Dawkins, but again, this is his view; not one pressed upon the reader. And it is all the more strong for that. He paints a vivid picture of Christ as he might have been and how he must have been perceived, within the society in which he found himself, and I found this particularly moving. He admits repeatedly that there is no proof for the existence of God; that most Christians - himself included - have frequent doubts. But what he has experienced for the main part does transcend those doubts. Most of all, he brings home the reality (for him) that Christianity makes sense. It is an impossible road to follow, but that that's okay; it is only by reaching for the impossible that we manage, just occasionally, to grasp the possible.

This book is very readable, and at times, I found it hard to put down. And if the language is at times crude, then that fits in with the informal style of the writing, and didn't bother me (although some readers might object). I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in Christianity, whether believer or non-believer. Whoever you are, it is likely to make for absorbing, and at times entertaining, reading.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback