Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.99

Save £3.00 (33%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Ultima (Proxima Book 2) by [Baxter, Stephen]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Ultima (Proxima Book 2) Kindle Edition

3.4 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.99

Length: 560 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £8.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deals: Up to 70% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price - for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deals or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deals Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Complete Series

Product Description

Review

[Stephen Baxter] is one of the few still producing massive, fastidiously textured SF epics that engage the intelligence of the reader. Ideas come thick and fast, and an exhilarating sense of wonder is guaranteed. (The Independent)

Stephen Baxter is an incredibly skilled author - a successor to Arthur C Clarke and Philip K Dick who has kept me entertained for years with his clever books written around huge ideas and concepts. (Book Bag)

Ultima is a tour-de-force of grand Space Opera, where an unbridled enthusiasm and super-long timelines create a tale full of wonder and cool imaginings. Whilst enjoying the travelogue, it is clear that, in the finest Clarkean tradition, the joy of discovery leads to even greater mysteries to be understood. Ultima is great fun. I loved this book, even more than the first, and I really want to read the next book as soon as possible. Definitely one of my favourites of 2014. (SFF World)

this is a hard SF novel that battles bravely with big ideas. With every passing year, the oft-made remark that Baxter is Arthur C. Clarke's heir seems more and more apt (SFX)

Book Description

The astonishing new SF novel from multi-award winning author Stephen Baxter - a dizzying exploration of alternate universes and deep time.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2387 KB
  • Print Length: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz (27 Nov. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00L845T5I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,043 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In “Proxima”, Stephan Baxter brilliantly set up one of his mindblowing mysteries, spanning deep time, strange physics and the potential for a million parallel universes. It’s what he does best – that Stapledonian sense of vast processes grinding away above us, and humans who heroically beat back against the void over thousands of years, finding ways to thrive and survive against the odds and even understand a little of the huge, alien and indifferent entities arrayed against them.

In “Ultima”, all of that is dropped like a hot, tasty, potato in favour of some of the most turgid nonsense I’ve ever seen this author perpetrate. Everyone get bogged down in the politics of an alternate universe of ROMANS IN SPAAACE, a conceit Baxter enjoys so much he has them repeat a remarkably similar (albeit foreshortened) adventure with INCAS IN SPAAACE, thus taking up four fifths of the book with two goes at a kind of story he’s almost uniquely unsuited to tell. Baxter’s prose is pretty distinctive –humane but somehow inhuman, precise, detached, a little stuffy. It’s ideal for convincing us of the chilly landscapes of deep space and time, but it swashes very few buckles and is a woefully clumsy tool for conveying intricate family drama.

Meanwhile, the parts that might reasonably have interested the reader – the meaning of all the strange events set up in the previous book – are doled out in flat monologue by a trusty Explainatron 3,000 in the form of the Starshine AI as the characters pass by him in the course of their frankly lacklustre adventures.

That’s where he can be bothered to pick it up at all. Think you’re going to find out what happened to the descendants of the bitter, tortured starship mind sent to Proxima all those years ago? Nope.
Read more ›
3 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having just finished Proxima I couldn't wait to start Ultima, all I can say is what a disappointment.

Proxima was a well written SF story and like any good SF story it was based upon entirely fictional scenarios that were nonetheless believable. Ultima on the other hand is just ridiculous, you have Roman soldiers, yes Roman soldiers, cruising about the galaxy in starships, colonizing other planets whilst still dressing as pre-Christian soldiers did and still using swords.

Perhaps it all comes together later on, but having got through the first few chapters I really couldn't be bothered to read on and find out.

A complete waste of money!
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having enjoyed the first I was hoping for something better. It was a massive struggle to wade through turgid descriptions of alternate Roman and Aztec spacefaring civilisations. Most of it could have been dismissed in couple of quick chapters for all the value it added... "Two of the more interesting alternative universes they zipped through were Roman and Aztec ones. It was quite a bore and everyone was quite glad to move on" Something like that. Time is short people and thats a few hours I'll never get back.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
[Review contains spoilers for Proxima but spoiler free for this book]

So after the events of Proxima we find ourselves in a slightly different universe. Yuri, Stef and the Col-U came through a hatch and the ship escaping the war on Earth also finds its way into this changed universe. It's a jobar hinge, a place where history has swung in a different direction. Here, the Roman empire never fell and the Romans are now travelling through space expanding their empire and building hatches.

A fair chunk of this big novel is about this changed history. Baxter's best work often comes from a "what if" scenario- this one being what if the Roman empire survived. I thought it worked really well and the completely outlandish idea felt somehow plausible with all the detail Baxter gives.

Of course, this book also spends a lot of time on the hardcore sci-fi theme- the mysterious hatches and the force behind them. Obviously it's aliens of some kind but I really liked what these aliens were like. Usually we get a 2001-ish species which are sort of ethereal, all powerful beings but here we are given a very different powerful alien, and one which feels at least a little closer to reality.

All in all, I really enjoyed the book. There's a hint of the author's Manifold series about it as it explores different universes and it is a successful sequel to Proxima. It's just a shame really about the ending. I'm not going to spoil it but it is pretty pessimistic, even for Baxter.

Very enjoyable and I keep feeling Baxter gets better with every book.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A good follow up to Proximal. I enjoyed Baxter's tales of interstellar travel (Roman legion in space) and space habitats far more than his admittedly carefully thought out explanation about real purpose of his fictional multiverse.

Yes the big themes were interesting but they were so convoluted that he had to spell it all out at the end of the novel.

I think he'd have been better off writing a pure adventure novel with less complexity. Hopefully that's the end of the series and the interstellar interdimensional road trip is over!!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover