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Uglies (Uglies Series Book 1) by [Westerfeld, Scott]
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Uglies (Uglies Series Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 196 customer reviews
Book 1 of 4 in Uglies Series (4 Book Series)
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Length: 433 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Fun, and the many by-the-skin-of-your-teeth escapes and hoverboard chases, plus the non-stop action plotting were enough to catch my attention and have me eagerly wanting more."
-- The Book Smugglers, 6 Aug 09

About the Author


Scott Westerfeld's other teen books include the Midnighters series, "Peeps," "So Yesterday," and "The Last Days." He divides his summers between Sydney, Australia, and New York City.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 878 KB
  • Print Length: 433 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's UK (4 Mar. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003ATPRWO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 196 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,876 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
UGLIES is one of the best children's SF novels I've come across for a year, and as it will get nothing out of its publishers but word-of-mouth I strongly recommend you buy it if you have a daughter going through puberty, because it dramatises the sick, looks-obsessed world we live in like nothing else. Tally can't wait until she's 16 and can be changed by plastic surgery into a Pretty, whose life like that of her best friend, will be filled with parties and fashionable clothes. In the future, everyone looks like a supermodel, and nobody stops to think whether this is a good thing - after all, there are no more wars, are there? But when Tally's new friend Shay takes off to live with the rebel Uglies, Tally is told she will never be made Pretty unless she follows the cryptic directions her friend left for her and betrays the rebels. This Tally is all set to do - until she not only falls in love but discovers just what the surgery awaiting her will do to her brain as well as her body.
Uglies is a really clever and pertinent dystopian fantasy of a kind that asks children whether they really want to give up their individuality to become a blandly perfect being. Exciting, fast-paced and easy to read it tackles the propaganda pumped out by glossy magazines and shows how ugly extreme beauty would be.
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Format: Paperback
On reading reviews of this book it seems only aimed at young teenage girls. As I am a 19 year old myself I also found this book fantastic. I couldn't put it down. I found it such as interesting read for in the insight it can give into the perception of beauty. I belive this book can be enjoyed by older and younger teens alike as they will see different things within the book. I came away with desperate to read the second book. I recommend it to all. My boyfriend is also currently enjoying reading it, so maybe it's not just for us girls?
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I read the words `cat vomit` in the first sentence of Westerfeld's book, as he described the colour of the sky, I remember thinking: I hope this is not a taste of what is to come. But nothing came to merit those words, lest it be the opposition of ugliness to a standardised notion of beauty that underlies the book. I wonder why the author used them, especially in his opening sentence.

Writing Uglies must have been a challenge for Scott Westerfeld. Challenge? The difficulty is inherent in the central theme of the book: the glorification of a standarised canon of beauty imposed by surgical intervention. All teenagers, who are universally called uglies, have come to despise their appearance and yearn for the beauty they will have once they are sixteen and are operated on to make them "pretty". It is not easy to write a story in which most of the population's appearance and behaviour have been normalised such that there are few distinguishing features. There's a sort of faceless grin or grimace to the world. Even the baddies, when they finally erupt on the stage, look alike. No wonder the main character, Tally, and her new-found ugly friend, swim in a sea of faceless people at the beginning of the book. This narrowness of perspective and the flippancy of the two girls makes holding the reader's attention more difficult.

The story did however hold my attention from the beginning, although I did wonder what it was that gave it more rounded edges than many a dystopian novel. I suspect this is partly because the threats and dangers are only hinted at but are not personified or made present in the first part of the story. It is as if the girls can get away with anything without being caught (despite narrow scrapes). Nothing matters. They'll all be pretty soon.
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Format: Paperback
I was really looking forward to reading this book when I bought it, I thought the concept seemed really interesting. However for me it wasn't anything special. It wasn't awful, it had a decent plot and I liked how it confronted how society is obsessed with being 'beautiful', but I found myself not really caring about the characters. I'm 18 and I'm guessing this book is probably aimed at a very slightly younger age group than me. I'm not normally a person to nitpick at books but some things in this book just seemed to come far too easily to the characters, and I never really worried about the characters survival either, it just seemed like a given that the main ones were going to survive.
Overall it was a decent book but I didn't find it anything special. It'd probably be better suited for ages 10-16.
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Format: Paperback
Uglies is the first novel in a new futuristic series set after an apocalyptic-disaster that reshaped the world and follows the life of Tally, a fifteen year old 'ugly' who lives to be a 'pretty.' In this new society, humans travel by hover-boards, can access anything they want through a hole in their wall and live as 'uglies' until they reach sixteen, when every person goes through extreme cosmetic surgery to make them 'pretty.' The uglies and pretties live separately in dorm rooms in private towns, in the center of the 'burbs' where the parents live.

Tally is about to turn sixteen and cannot wait to turn pretty, until she makes a new friend. Her new friend, Shay, doesn't want to become pretty and is very keen on exploring the ruins of the old cities ran by 'rusties' (the people of today's society - you and me) and living life away from the sheltered community they currently live in.

I've read a lot of contradicting opinions on the book, but mine is fairly straight forward. I really enjoyed reading this book and I can't wait to read the others in the series. The story, in my opinion, was well written and whilst slow at times, was entertaining throughout. It isn't a difficult read, it's quite simple to follow and can be read within a short period of time. If you look deeper into the book, there is a social commentary present and it made me question the ways in which we see ourselves as a society and the impact appearance has on our daily lives. I would definitely recommend reading this book as it's entertaining and an interesting concept to think about.
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