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Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery Paperback – 24 Nov 2000

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press; New Ed edition (24 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231110154
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231110150
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,522,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"Worth [its] weight in gold.... Matar's work adds to the discourse of both orientalism and post-colonialism by providing essential detailed historical analysis of primary sources.... Extremely informative and enlightening." -- "The Muslim World Book Review"

"An important but neglected topic. Matar has done early modern scholarship an important service." -- "Sixteenth Century Journal"

"A valuable contribution to the study of the rise of Orientalism and colonialism... perceptive and elegantly written." -- "Arab Studies Journal"

"Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational." -- William Dalrymple, "New York Review of Books"

"An interesting study of cultural contact between the English and the Moors and Turks of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and how this contact influenced subsequent English interactions with native peoples of the New World." -- "Library Journal"

"Worth Ýits¨ weight in gold.... Matar's work adds to the discourse of both orientalism and post-colonialism by providing essential detailed historical analysis of primary sources.... Extremely informative and enlightening." -- "The Muslim World Book Review"

"An important but neglected topic. Matar has done early modern scholarship an important service." -- Sixteenth Century Journal

"A valuable contribution to the study of the rise of Orientalism and colonialism... perceptive and elegantly written." -- Arab Studies Journal

"Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational." -- William Dalrymple, New York Review of Books

"An interesting study of cultural contact between the English and the Moors and Turks of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and how this contact influenced subsequent English interactions with native peoples of the New World." -- Library Journal

"Worth [its] weight in gold.... Matar's work adds to the discourse of both orientalism and post-colonialism by providing essential detailed historical analysis of primary sources.... Extremely informative and enlightening." -- The Muslim World Book Review

"An important but neglected topic. Matar has done early modern scholarship an important service." -- "Sixteenth Century Journal"

"A valuable contribution to the study of the rise of Orientalism and colonialism... perceptive and elegantly written." -- "Arab Studies Journal"

"Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational." -- William Dalrymple, "New York Review of Books"

"An interesting study of cultural contact between the English and the Moors and Turks of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and how this contact influenced subsequent English interactions with native peoples of the New World." -- "Library Journal"

"Worth [its] weight in gold.... Matar's work adds to the discourse of both orientalism and post-colonialism by providing essential detailed historical analysis of primary sources.... Extremely informative and enlightening." -- "The Muslim World Book Review"

Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational.--William Dalrymple "New York Review of Books "

Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational.

--William Dalrymple "New York Review of Books "

Matar's work is full of surprises for anyone who believes that Christian-Muslim relations have always been confrontational.--William Dalrymple "New York Review of Books "

From the Inside Flap

DURING THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary Corsairs" raided coastal towns and, if captured, lingered in Plymouth jails or stood trial in Southampton courtrooms. In turn, Britons fought in Muslim armies, traded and settled in Moroccan or Tunisian harbor towns, joined the international community of pirates in Mediterranean and Atlantic outposts, served in Algerian households and ships, and endured captivity from Salee to Alexandria and from Fez to Mocha.

In Turks, Moors, and Englishmen, Nabil Matar vividly presents new data about Anglo-Islamic social and historical interactions. Rather than looking exclusively at literary works, which tended to present unidimensional stereotypes of Muslims -- Shakespeare's "superstitious Moor" or Goffe's "raging Turke", to name only two -- Matar delves into hitherto unexamined English prison depositions, captives' memoirs, government documents, and Arabic chronicles and histories. The result is a significant alternative to the prevailing discourse on Islam, which nearly always centers around ethnocentrism and attempts at dominance over the non-Western world, and an astonishing revelation about the realities of exchange and familiarity between England and Muslim society in the Elizabethan and early Stuart periods.

Concurrent with England's engagement and "discovery" of the Muslims was the "discovery" of the American Indians. In an original analysis, Matar shows how Haklyt and Purchas taught their readers not only about America but about the Muslim dominions, too; how there were morereasons for Britons to venture eastward than westward; and how, in the period under study, more Englishmen lived in North Africa than in North America. Although Matar notes the sharp political and colonial differences between the English encounter with the Muslims and their encounter with the Indians, he shows how Elizabethan and Stuart writers articulated Muslim in terms of Indian, and Indian in terms of Muslim. By superimposing the sexual constructions of the Indians onto the Muslims, and by applying to them the ideology of holy war which had legitimated the destruction of the Indians, English writers prepared the groundwork for orientalism and for the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conquest of Mediterranean Islam.

Matar's detailed research provides a new direction in the study of England's geographic imagination. It also illuminates the subtleties and interchangeability of stereotype, racism, and demonization that must be taken into account in any responsible depiction of English history. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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on 26 August 2002
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
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5.0 out of 5 starsFascinating way to spend some of your well earned time
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5.0 out of 5 starsOutstanding research effort and beautifully written.
on 10 March 2000 - Published on Amazon.com
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