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on 29 March 2014
It's an academic subject but well enough written so that a layperson can understand it.
It appears to be a plain unbiased statement of the author's position on these various Biblical texts.
With any subject other than Biblical doctrines I'm fairly sure it would be accepted as the definitive result of academic research.
As it is however it appears to have opened a Pandora's box of critique and dispute, which sadly always seems to be the norm within Theology. or perhaps more accurately within Christology.
For me, I will use it in harmony with its title and will accept it as unbiased until someone without a public doctrinal position is able to show it to be wrong!
Thank you Prof. Behhn for having the courageous to publish it knowing I'm sure that it would cause you much adverse publicity.
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on 10 September 2017
Excellent
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VINE VOICEon 3 September 2005
This is a most useful book for anyone interested in issues of New Testament translation. The writing, though scholarly, is accessible to the non-Greek-scholar reader. Professor BeDuhn's explanations are very clear and make for an illuminating read. Even if the reader is not interested in extensive comparison of moderns English translations, there are many pleasurable felicities which will add to enjoyment and understanding in reading the New Testament.
Although the book is really about specific issues of translation, and bias, it might have been nice to include a short chapter giving a brief overview and opinion of the general English style of each translation. The New English Bible, long quite popular in the UK, is sadly not included, since this book is by a scholar in the USA.
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VINE VOICEon 9 October 2009
This is a most useful book for anyone interested in issues of New Testament translation.

The writing, though scholarly, is accessible to the non-Greek-scholar reader. Professor BeDuhn's explanations are very clear and make for an illuminating read. Even if the reader is not interested in extensive comparison of moderns English translations, there are many interesting points and insights which will add to enjoyment and understanding in reading the New Testament.

Although the book is really about specific issues of translation, and bias, it might have been nice to include a short chapter giving a brief overview and opinion of the general English style of each translation. The New English Bible, long quite popular in the UK, is sadly not included, since this book is by a scholar in the USA.

The book does not aim to be a comprehensive examination or evaluation of each of the translations chosen. Rather, specific passages are chosen for comparison, and the passages slected are ones which might more readily demonstrate bias on the part of translators. BeDuhn's explanations of the language of the passages, and of the context of the writing, are fascinating.
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on 24 November 2014
Great addition to your collection if you're interested in the technicalities of Bible translation. Some caution should be exercised however - this is a textbook and therefore will bombard with academic information, so it is more of a reference book. Also the writer places absolute importance on literal translation - even when this makes it difficult for Bible students to understand what was *meant* in the original texts.

Thankfully BeDuhn doesn't draw too many conclusions or relate too many opinions. Instead he takes a very scientific approach - 'Is it translated accurately or not?'

I recommend this to advanced Bible students who want to create a library of different sources/opinions and seek raw information for them to use.
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on 21 December 2014
one of the easiest to read and finest comparisons I have ever read. I particularly appreciated his lack of any personal bias reflected throughout the book. As a bible student of many years his views re-enforced my understanding of scripture.
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on 19 December 2007
This is quite simply the best book I have read on Bible translation. Once I got started I couldn't put it down! I was amazed to see how BeDuhn dissects the most contravercial verses in the NT to explain how and why each of the most popular versions of the NT has translated them. What makes this book so good is that he steers clear of interpreting what he thinks these verses are saying and concentrates on the correctness of the translations themselves, leaving it for the reader to come to their own conclusion. Since the vast majority of Christians are unable to read Koine greek we rely on Bible translations being accurate and unbiased by established doctrine. However, BeDuhns research presents some very surprising results. This should be a must-read for all Christians - but unfortunately, due to the nature of this book I expect only very serious students of the Bible will read it - and that is a great pity!
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on 17 November 2003
I have had Jason BeDuhn's book on Bible translations of the New Testament for 4 months now and the first reading was a very enjoyable read for someone interested in Bible translations. The second reading, which was more of a study of its contents and arguments, opened my eyes further to what has happened and is still happening in the Bible translations commonly used today. I keeping returning to it for reference. BeDuhn examines 9 popular Bible translations of the N.T alongside the Greek that these same translate. He chooses 9 scripture passages or words to examine which, because of their Christological and theological importance, the accuracy and bias in those Bible translations in use to day can be assessed. His style is clear and concise and yet at the same time broad enough for a proper analysis of the subject matter and allowing the underlining Greek of the New Testament speak for itself. The results of his examination of the translations such as the New Revised Standard Version, New International Version, the Good News Bible, the New World Translation and 5 others brings surprising results. He opens up his examination of these Bibles' accuracy and bias(which his preface and introduction shows what he means by these terms and why he embarked on such a work as this) by first taking a look at the origins of modern English Bibles, then methods translators use to render into English the original biblical languages and before looking at specific places and words that are crucial for translators to get 'right' if they wish to claim to be free of unwarranted bias and to produce an accurate translation that neither adds or takes away from the original Greek. This book is, I feel, I must read for both scholars and 'laymen' alike. If any wish to disagree with his analysis and conclusions based on these same then Jason BeDuhn would no doubt be very interested to hear of them. Really, this book is like a gauntlet thrown down for _all_ those translations he assesses. Finally, I would like to whet the appetite for others who might already be tempted to gain for themselves this book that in his chapter "A Final Word" a particular translation comes 'top' for accuracy(based upon those words/passages he has chosen) and it is not from those whom have been produced by well known scholars and translators but a translation that has been much maligned since its first edition in 1950. I _highly_ recommend this book and I do not do _that_ very often.
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on 1 February 2010
As a serious student of the Bible I have often been disturbed at the inconsistencies when it comes to other translations of the Scriptures. Prof. Beduhn has exposed many of these and surprisingly comes down very firmly on the side of The New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures published by Jehovah's Witnesses. This publication Truth in Translation is well worth a good study.
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on 21 May 2010
I was emailed concerning this book , it contains a real up close look at the original greek text , to see if the translation of many well appointed versions have kept to the word faithfully ,or wether they have overstepped the mark, and have added a bias depending on the version they would like to put over

Its no wonder there is confusion in the world of religion .However the truth of the bible really shines through in this book .of course it is no substitute for reading the bible itself ....but there lies the issue , ....which one will give you the most closely adhered to original message ...i will not spoil it
if you value the truth then read this book!! I really enjoyed it!
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