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Truth by [Temple, Peter]
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Truth Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews

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Length: 417 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

A towering achievement that brings alive a ferocious landscape and a motley assortment of clashing characters. The sense of place is stifling in its intensity, and seldom has a waltz of the damned proven so hypnotic. Indispensable - Maxim Jakubowski, Guardian



Quercus deserve a big pat on the back for introducing him to British readers...great locations, hard-nosed dialogue and a twisting plot combine to create superb entertainment - Evening Standard

Evening Standard

...great locations, hard-nosed dialogue and a twisting plot combine to create superb entertainment

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3566 KB
  • Print Length: 417 pages
  • Publisher: riverrun (1 July 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004CYEWRM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 57 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #46,508 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Truth" is a superior police thriller set in Melbourne, Victoria. Plot, character, setting and style reinforce one another brilliantly to make a rich, dark and satisfying whole.

Stephen Villani is Melbourne's Head of Homicide. In this book - which despite the minor reappearance of some characters from the also excellent "The Broken Shore" is standalone rather than part of a series - Villani faces two major cases. In the first, a young woman is found murdered in a VIP apartment in the city's new casino complex; in the second, three thugs are found tortured and murdered in the suburb of Oakleigh. This description does not do justice to Temple's extraordinary weave of sub-plot and sub-sub-plot. "Truth" encompasses politics, business, the media, race, intra-team and inter-team police dynamics, family issues across three generations, adultery, bush fires, technology, corruption and ghosts, both threatening and benign. A story diagram for "Truth" would look like the wiring blueprint for an Airbus A380. Yet, Temple pulls it off. The reader does not get lost but rather is absorbed in a complex and vaguely disturbing world.

Temple does not lose the reader because all the strands are held together in Steve Villani's head. He has a sharp and fluid intelligence and an internal compass that largely keeps him level despite the almost overwhelming accumulation of stresses and events. The rest of the large cast is strong too, ranging from Villani's tough gruff father, through Dove, his aboriginal assistant, and Rose Quirk the mother of a man killed by the police in an earlier case to various examples of Victoria's great and not- so-good.
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Format: Paperback
I've read all of Temples books... he's one of my favourite authors. His style is unique and takes some adjusting to, he introduces a lot of characters (usually known by several nicknames!) and generally its an idea to read his books in as few sittings as possible or you may find yourself scratching your head and flicking back through the pages.

In this offering, I felt the clipped prose was overdone, and at times it was hard work to establish who was saying (or more typically, implying with a nod and a wink) what to whom. I found myself regularly re-reading bits to make sure i'd got it.

The author is intelligent with a dry wit, but its a leap of faith to accept that all his characters in reality would share those traits with him... though I guess that's a trade off for a more entertaining read. Maybe the book was too smart for this reader, but whilst it never lost my interest I found it all a bit hard work to be honest.

If you're new to Temple I'd start elsewhere in his back catalogue before dipping in to this one.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I'm English and found the 'Australian' feel one of the best features of the book - a really fascinating taste of the differences in cultures. I found the short, sparse sentences very effective, and the characterization convincing. The plots are fine, certainly not impenetrable, and the formulas always applied with a degree of originality. Maybe the Broken Shore is even more atmospheric, and the Jack Irish series more entertaining in a satirical way, but this is full of political purpose (like James Lee Burke) and yet he has a quite separate and individual voice to any other crime novelist I have found. I have seen some people complaining that the whole thing is too bleak and the characters too unsympathetic. Well - that describes the reader as much as the book, for me. OK - so Macbeth is a gloomy play! I don't criticize it for that. Same applies. This is quality - and is a development from the earlier novels which is refreshing and arresting. I love the Robicheaux and Bosch series but they do repeat an awful lot. Go for it if you're undecided, but as always, it's much better to read the earlier books first. Particularly, Read The Broken Shore before this. Then you'll get a 5 star experience out of both books.
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Format: Paperback
`Truth' opens with an almost impossible and unsolvable murder. On one of the highest floors of a new skyscraper complex, which can only be reached with various security cards, a woman is found in the bath with her neck broken. What makes this all the more difficult to solve is that it happened on the opening night of the Casino down below and the security system went down. In steps Stephen Villani, currently acting as Melbourne's Head of Homicide, who's mission it is to solve the riddle. It is also Villani who later thinks what initially looks like another random murder of three men in the suburbs of Oakleigh might actually be connected. From here Temple weaves in a mystery which is just as much political as it is about catching killers.

Temple also captures an interesting picture of Australia with `Truth' as the bush fires rage in the background it looks at the state of the politics and business climate which I admit if I had known beforehand would have put me off slightly, however I read on and didn't get bored once despite it not being quite my cup of tea subject wise. What I will admit I struggled with initially was the fact that the prose of the book is so taut every single word counts to the point where it's almost so shortened and saying so much per sentence or sparse conversation you sometimes need to re-read. Once you have gotten around that and are in the full flow of the book you see the purpose of it, it speeds everything up and heightens it.

The other thing that made this book good and also slightly clichéd all at once (if that makes sense?) was Villani himself. He's so flawed (adulterous), complex (always concerned about his daughter, has a weird relationship with his father) that he ends up rather a typical crime novel anti-hero.
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