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Trombone Concerto/Gorgon/Iscariot

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

Currently unavailable.
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Product details

  • Audio CD (6 Dec. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: PHCD167
  • ASIN: B000OZ0OT8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,087,677 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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5:37
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0:44
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4:58
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0:47
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This 1990s recording gives a decent overview of Rouse's musical style and development. Many critics differentiate his early works from his more recent works. They point out that the early works are more forceful and aggressive. From this evidence that is certainly true but in terms of any technical changes there is rather less of a shift - perhaps a subtle shift towards more tonally centred music in the "later" works.

The early work here is "Gorgon" from 1984. It is seventeen minutes of relentlessly aggressive music, easily out blasting the Rite of Spring. There are few let ups as Perseus slays the three gorgons with two percussion interludes to allow the listener to catch their breath (not that the first interlude is any let up at all). It may not be subtle and you're never going to hear it on Classic FM but this assault on the senses is impossible to ignore. Rouse lectured on Rock music and has taken some of those sensibilities into this work. Not for the more nervous listener but if you're prepared for the attack it is a remarkable piece. Whatever the inspiration I can imagine such a work being a great comfort to a young man who has been dumped by his uinfaithful girlfriend: I almost wish I was that young again just to enjoy that sense of released pent up rage even more.

The Pulitzer Prize winning Trombone Concerto of 1992 belongs to the "later" works. The trombone certainly isn't treated as acomedy instrument in this largely introspective work. Cast in three movements: slow - fast- slow; It begins in hushed and mournful manner before the central quick movement recalls "Gorgon's" agitation - there is a hint too, in the mainly brass supported sections, of Lutoslawski's raucous aleatory music as well.
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Format: Audio CD
This 1990s recording gives a decent overview of Rouse's musical style and development. Many critics differentiate his early works from his more recent works. They point out that the early works are more forceful and aggressive. From this evidence that is certainly true but in terms of any technical changes there is rather less of a shift - perhaps a subtle shift towards more tonally centred music in the "later" works.

The early work here is "Gorgon" from 1984. It is seventeen minutes of relentlessly aggressive music, easily out blasting the Rite of Spring. There are few let ups as Perseus slays the three gorgons with two percussion interludes to allow the listener to catch their breath (not that the first interlude is any let up at all). It may not be subtle and you're never going to hear it on Classic FM but this assault on the senses is impossible to ignore. Rouse lectured on Rock music and has taken some of those sensibilities into this work. Not for the more nervous listener but if you're prepared for the attack it is a remarkable piece. Whatever the inspiration I can imagine such a work being a great comfort to a young man who has been dumped by his uinfaithful girlfriend: I almost wish I was that young again just to enjoy that sense of released pent up rage even more.

The Pulitzer Prize winning Trombone Concerto of 1992 belongs to the "later" works. The trombone certainly isn't treated as acomedy instrument in this largely introspective work. Cast in three movements: slow - fast- slow; It begins in hushed and mournful manner before the central quick movement recalls "Gorgon's" agitation - there is a hint too, in the mainly brass supported sections, of Lutoslawski's raucous aleatory music as well.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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