Troilus and Cressida: BBC... has been added to your Basket

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£8.79
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Quality Media Supplies Ltd.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Troilus and Cressida: BBC Shakespeare Collection [DVD] [1981]

3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

Price: £8.78 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by movielovers786 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
9 new from £4.99
£8.78 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by movielovers786 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Troilus and Cressida: BBC Shakespeare Collection [DVD] [1981]
  • +
  • Timon Of Athens (BBC Shakespeare Collection) [DVD] [1981]
  • +
  • Titus Andronicus - BBC Shakespeare Collection [1985]
Total price: £18.83
Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Actors: Anton Lesser, Suzanne Burden, Charles Gray, Benjamin Whitrow, John Shrapnel
  • Directors: Jonathan Miller
  • Producers: Shaun Sutton
  • Format: PAL, Full Screen, Subtitled
  • Language: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: BBC Worldwide
  • Run Time: 190 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000KPAL2W
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 31,305 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

The bitter Trojan War drags on - the Greeks blame Achilles' apathy for low morale, while Troy's hero Hector challenges one of the enemy to a personal duel. And after her father exchanges Cressida for a Trojan prisoner, the war becomes personal for her distraught lover Troilus. Jonathan Miller pitches his acclaimed production of this part-histoy, part-tragedy between satire and savage farce, highlighting Shakespeare's cynical standpoint where love is mocked and heroism made absurd.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Jonathan Miller triumphs with a fascinating production of an unruly play. His eye for casting is faultless, and different from others in the series. This personal view is emphasized by his special precision as director in revealing the interplay of character. There is absolutely no rhetoric for sound's sake here - every character knows exactly why they are saying what they're saying, and who they're saying it to.

The running time of "Troilus" is 12 minutes longer than that of "Pericles," yet it feels around 45 minutes shorter. Much of this play is done with a single mobile camera in long, unblinking takes. This adds to the pressure on the actors and crew, and contributes to a special kind of energy.

The performances are all excellent, without an embarrassment in the cast. That is not always true in this series. The young lovers are fine. Charles Gray grabs the role of Pandarus, and shakes it within an inch of its life. This huge personality is almost too big for the small screen, yet he never quite outstays his welcome.

Ben Whitrow's Ulysses is perhaps the most clever, calculating and cold-blooded of any, in any version of the story I've seen. Anthony Pedley is a funny Ajax, and Kenneth Haigh and John Shrapnel are confident as Achilles and Hector. Esmond Knight as King Priam and Jack Birkett as Thersites are both blind actors, which adds a certain otherworldly quality to the proceedings. The physical production and sound design are both detailed and effective.

The book "The BBC Shakespeare Plays: Making the Televised Canon" by Susan Willis spends a whole chapter describing in detail the rehearsal, taping and editing of this "Troilus." Highly recommended reading.

P.S. The prologue is read off-camera by an uncredited actor. Could it be Alec McCowen? Whoever it is reads the Bard's words as they should be read, a model for would-be Shakespeareans to study.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is one of Shakespeare's lesser known plays. Not written for the Globe it was actually done for lawyers and is full of legal puns. One of his darkest plays it presupposes that lust, not love, conquers all and that in human relationships no one truly wins. This is a stark, simple production well put together and performed and not likely to be bettered for a long time as it is so infrequently staged. Troilus is an innocent, Pandarus a pimp, Thersites a brawling malcontent. One could go on but there isn't a worthwhile person in the play. Cressida is fundamentally a whore and all this put out with what I think is some of the greatest dialogue Shakespeare ever wrote. If you have a chance see it but don't expect to be cheered up it's just not that sort of play but well worth seeing for all that.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
Engaging plot/story, complemented by outstanding performances by Charles Gray and others, including 'The Incredible Orlando', whose character you won't soon forget. Again, Shakespeare casts a cynical eye over human pride, folly, 'heroism' (as in how Hector meets his end) and more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I was looking forward to this, as 'Troilius and Cressida' is oneof my favourtite plays.

I thought Miller's version of 'All's Well That End's Well' brilliant. This was a disappointment in comparison. The drab colours as oppossed to the brilliant, visually appealing 'All's Well' were presumably intentional, in line with the 'dark mood' of the play, but I thought the tone dark enough without them.

Then there was the casting; these are supposed to be warriors; as such, they would be as physical as could be, and only a few of them would be likely to live to be middle aged, let alone old. Granted that the Trojan War supposedly lasted ten years, but from this cast of grey and silver haired individuals, you would think that it had lasted twenty-five.

I realise that the director must have been seeking to undercut the legend of a band of fearless, glamourous, youthful doomed heroes, but he has taken it to extremes by chosing such a cast. The youth Troilus is middle-aged. Cressida is young and very pretty, but oddly prissy in her demaeanour; how Ulysses sees her as a potential 'daughter of the game' was a mystery to me. Helen is beautiful enough in her red dress, one of the few splashes of colour in the whole.

Achilles looks like a fat 'media pesonality' gone to seed,lumbering and effete. Aneus (who in legend goes on to Carthage and later Rome) looks old, Ulysses speeches come across as empty rhetoric, though he is depicted as feeling for Troilus. Paris has a dry, scruffy beard like a down and out. Hector looks as though he has seen better days, Ajax and Diomedes are aging,and for sure when Achilles waddles up to Hector in the ambush scene it is the low point of the drama.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
It's very hard to like (or even watch) this production. I rate it at "2 stars" but I'm taking
a star off because Thersites is played as a raging queen. Honestly,
what is wrong with some of these "producers" [yes, I know it's J. Miller]? Sure, the homoerotic
overtones in the play are undeniable - but how is that a licence to slap them willy nilly all
over the surface of the play? [Hilarious 'pun' intended].

This is a very fine play from Shakespeare - it doesn't need any no-hopers dressing it up!
At least we're spared Pandarus as aging and syphilitic drag queen [another high profile
production].

Anyway, that's by the by. The real problem here is not so much the acting as the CASTING (and
the directing). Most of the actors are just unable to play their parts [no doubt they're all
fully capable of performing in more suitable roles].
As a result, the whole thing is as dull and flat as the proverbials, and almost embarrassing to watch.
For example, Ajax - yes the whole 'heroic' thing is being deflated, but he's not supposed to
be the village idiot! The actor stumbles around like he was expecting to be playing Benny
in Crossroads.

Don't get me started on Hector or Paris, or why Cassandra interrupts the Trojan council of war
with a display of amateur dramatics. I couldn't stand it and turned it off before the end of
the third act.

It's a shame because the 'eponymous' trio [Pandarus, as pandar, being eponymous in his own way]
could have been very good. Pandarus is so brilliantly repellent as to end up being unwatchable
(like most of the cast, though for a different reason). Troilus appeared adequate at least,
probably better.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions


Look for similar items by category


Feedback