Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.49

Save £5.50 (61%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
<hza:string id="udp_accessibility_ku_narration_badge"/>
Read and listen for free. Learn more
Read and listen for £0.00
with Kindle Unlimited
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Triple Play: A Nathan Heller Casebook (Nathan Heller Novels) by [Collins, Max Allan]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Triple Play: A Nathan Heller Casebook (Nathan Heller Novels) Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£3.49

Length: 235 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £3.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Complete Series

Product Description

About the Author

Max Allan Collins has earned fifteen Private Eye Writers of America "Shamus" nominations, winning for his Nathan Heller novels, True Detective and Stolen Away, and receiving the PWA life achievement award, the Eye. His graphic novel, Road to Perdition, which is the basis of the Academy Award-winning film starring Tom Hanks, was followed by two novels, Road to Purgatory and Road to Paradise. His suspense series include Quarry, Nolan, Mallory, and Eliot Ness, and his numerous comics credits include the syndicated Dick Tracy and his own Ms. Tree. He has written and directed five feature films and two documentaries, including "The Expert," a HBO World Premiere. His coffee-table book The History of Mystery received nominations for every major mystery award and Men’s Adventure Magazines won the Anthony Award. Collins lives in Muscatine, Iowa, with his wife, writer Barbara Collins. They have collaborated on seven novels and numerous short stories, and are currently writing the “Trash ‘n’ Treasures” mysteries.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 552 KB
  • Print Length: 235 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (17 April 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0054LXWXW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #173,239 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Su TOP 100 REVIEWER on 21 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I read a lot of true crime books (it's a sort of busman's holiday) most people add fictionalised thoughts and actions to the story to make it "more interesting"; they also add their beliefs and thoughts into the mix. Personally I'd sooner have the facts and decide for myself, but that's me.

Anyway, Max Allan Collins (MAC) is one of a growing number of authors who are using true crimes as a basis for their work. It is usually known as "snatched from the headlines" - a fictionalised version of a real life crime using real people - "only the names have been changed to protect the innocent" as the old crime shows use to say, except here some of the names have been changed to protect the guilty too.

In this book we have 3 stories - one long and 2 short:

.
* Dying in the Post War World - based on the "Lipstick Killer" William Heirens. Heirens was convicted of the murder of 3 people (2 women and a 6 year old girl) and is more notable for the message he is said to have left on the wall near one of his victims "for heaven's sake catch me before I kill more I cannot control myself" (there is now some debate as to whether this was written by Heirens or by a journalist - Heirens always refuted the claim that he wrote it).

When he was caught in 1946 he confessed to the 3 murders, but is has always been believed that there were several more. Heirens, who started murdering at the age of 17, died in prison in February 2012 at 83 years of age. His victims were 43, 32 and 6.

MAC says that he had to make alterations to the story because it was not complex enough for a solo novel ... well, I guess it depends on what you see as complex, or how much research you want to do for your story.

.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a collection of three short stories: Dying in the Post-War World, Kisses of Death and Strike Zone featuring Nathan Heller a wise mouthed, tough talking PI and owner of the A-1 Detective Agency. The stories are written in a fashion that's almost "glib" in so much as they're mostly dialogue and there's little depth which is perfect for this format. I thought the first story in the collection (Dying in the Post-War World) was by far the best, definitely the strongest of the three, though I did enjoy meeting up with Marilyn Monroe in the second story....certainly a different perspective on a great icon though not necessarily believable. I thought Collins ability to inject so much atmosphere into such short snapshots is an incredible talent and there's a genuine "noir" feel to the whole collection. Incredibly easy to read, took me no more than a couple of hours, and overall I enjoyed Triple Play.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This author is new to me, and I will certainly seek out more of his work. I went through a phase of reading the greats of the period, and Collins certainly captures the spirit and values of the times he writes about. Even to the extent of making one shift a little uneasily when faced with some of the less than entirely PC language contained in these novellas. More a record of the private detective's thoughts and actions than "whodunit" per se, these short stories are an engaging and diverting read.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Sussman TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 July 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Our hardboiled PI, Nathan Heller is a less than perfect character. His gene pool is made up of being half-Jewish, half-Irish, he's not averse to getting money the easy way, horny, and fairly amorally in his outlook. He can be bought off, but only on his own terms. Nate's old man killed himself with a nine-millimetre hand gun. Nate carries the same nine-millimetre which his father used on himself. Heller calls it "the closest thing to a conscience I've got". His stories/narratives are set between the 1940s up to the 1960s. This covers three, two of which are short and third that longer in the telling. Our Author Max Collins uses real life stories which he then interweaves into his own story, a sort what if we do this and then that scenario and borrows from old theories of what might or really did happen.

Unfortunately there is little suspense here; Heller seems to be always lucky in his detecting, while the bad guys seem to always go wrong somewhere. The language in the book seems dated There is humour, violence, and it's easy to get in to the book - it is really readable, but nothing special. I guess the book is a great book for fans of Nate Heller otherwise its good as time filler at the airport.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I only read the first and second story. Frankly it wasn't worth the considerable effort it took to read that much. The second story was particularly painful to wade through. Even though the third story was only about forty pages I couldn't face it.

The nuts and bolts quality of the prose was poor. I had a strong desire to get this into a word processor so I could edit every sentence. I could see ways of improving every single line. And I say this as someone who doesn't rate their own abilities to create coherent easy to read sentences. The writing was so uninspired that I even thought I could have written this better than the author. It's just really bad and flavourless for a published writer. There was no eye for detail, or a talent for creating thumbnail character portraits. He is a poor writer.

Here's an example from page 5:
"He gave me the address (of his home), and I wrote it down and hung up; went out in the kitchen, where Peg sat in her white terry cloth bathrobe, staring over her black coffee."

My edited version:
"He gave me the address of his house. I wrote it down and hung up. I walked into the kitchen to find Peg in her white terry cloth bathrobe staring at me over her black coffee."

He didn't even dream up his own storylines. All three cases are heavily inspired by real events. He pretty much just inserted his own detective character into real cases.

The results are not compelling. He has created a fifth rate photocopy of a photocopy attempt at hard boiled fiction. He is completely missing the wit, or the imagination, or the other pleasures from the genre. Raymond Chandler he isn't. If his prose had a bit of flair and panache then these could have been a lot more enjoyable.
Read more ›
2 Comments 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover