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Treason: The gripping Gunpowder Plot thriller by [Jackson, James]
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Treason: The gripping Gunpowder Plot thriller Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

Treason is such a well-written book, its complicated plot kept tightly under control, the dialogue intriguing. The Gunpowder Plot itself is covered in such fascinating, meticulous detail and I lapped this part of the novel up, enjoying in particular the two characters who radiate some charm in this dark world of conspiracies and counter-conspiracies, Adam Hardy and the Princess Elizabeth, but I still wouldn't trust either of them as far as I could throw them. Treason is a compelling read and extremely difficult to put down For Winter Nights

Review

Treason is such a well-written book, its complicated plot kept tightly under control, the dialogue intriguing. The Gunpowder Plot itself is covered in such fascinating, meticulous detail and I lapped this part of the novel up, enjoying in particular the two characters who radiate some charm in this dark world of conspiracies and counter-conspiracies, Adam Hardy and the Princess Elizabeth, but I still wouldn't trust either of them as far as I could throw them. Treason is a compelling read and extremely difficult to put down (For Winter Nights)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 874 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Zaffre (6 Oct. 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01H8XNP9O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #194,169 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It’s not hard to see why Frederick Forsyth is addicted to James Jackson’s books (a Forsyth endorsement appears on most, quite possibly all, of them, including this latest one, Treason). As in a Forsyth thriller, the orchestration of plot knots your stomach tighter with every page, luring you into the blind, fetid alleys of Jacobean London – thence, for instance, into the low light of a parlour where “the pinched and haggard faces seemed already to belong to the afterlife”... and, of course, down into the cellar beneath Parliament which “was too much like a tomb for comfort”. Given that we know the outcome of the 5th November (just as in Day of The Jackal we know that de Gaulle evades assassination), it’s the sub-plots – the individual confrontations, one of which, almost unbearably, pits Christian Hardy against his estranged son, Adam – that matter most. It’s here that Jackson demonstrates that he is without equal in the genre, not only because of the adroitness with which he shifts focus – from plotter to agents of the Crown and back again – but because of his delineation of character. The plotters are creatures of flesh and blood, led by Robert Catesby, a man of principle, of decency as well as valour; the Crown forces are compellingly human, too, not least James I himself, his decisions variously governed by cunning, fear and lust (“he scratched at his crotch with absent-minded pleasure”). Above all else, though, there is Jackson’s greatest creation: Realm – traitor and psychotic, a man capable of “almost feeling pity”, for whom barbarity is “simply a means, a habit needing to be fed, a store of screaming faces he glimpsed occasionally from afar”. A contemporary figure, in other words, within the higher command of the IRA or Islamic State.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Like The Day of the Jackal, we know the ending before we start, but that does nothing to spoil this nail-biting read. Jackson captures vividly the suspicion, fear and divided beliefs that characterised Jacobean England, and the ruthlessness with which the Catholics were persecuted in James I's reign. The writing is tense and the dialogue is superb. The characters of the individual plotters are individually and carefully drawn, so that we understand their motives and live their faith with them, and Jackson's portrayal of the shrewd and cynical Robert Cecil, the King's first minister who brings down the plotters, is delightfully nasty. A great read!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A bit slow in the middle, but by the end I couldn't put it down. I think it's probably quite historically accurate as well, going from the interview of James Jackson with James O'Brien on LBC recently. I'd certainly recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Readers will thrill and traitors tremble when they fall prey to the supple and ruthless imagination of James Jackson, Master Talesmith.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Brilliant and clever plot lines, with the added figures of the historical era thrown in the mix making this a thoroughly good page turner
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Format: Hardcover
Review

This is an excellent, hard and uncompromising novel, Taking the reader through the dark murky world of espionage in England in the early 1600’s. The brutality of the clash of protestant and catholic worlds, all narrowed down to a single plot, an attempted act of terrorism that still resounds through the country today such was its audacity.

James Jackson takes very little mercy on the reader, providing a view of London and wider England in all its filth, muck and mire, with betrayals, backstabbing, murder and mayhem. This is not a gentle time in this lands history and it is right it should be shown warts and all. When the author couples that with a twisting winding plot and disparate hunters many of which controlled by the spider at the center of the web of intrigue Robert Cecil you get a book that grabs you and doesn’t let go until the final page.

A very interesting and very powerful book, highly recommended

(Parm)
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