Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £6.02

Save £6.97 (54%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Treason: The gripping Gunpowder Plot thriller by [Jackson, James]
Kindle App Ad

Treason: The gripping Gunpowder Plot thriller Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£6.02

Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deals: Books from 99p
Sign-up to the Kindle Daily Deal email newsletter to discover daily deals from 99p.
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product description

Review

Treason is such a well-written book, its complicated plot kept tightly under control, the dialogue intriguing. The Gunpowder Plot itself is covered in such fascinating, meticulous detail and I lapped this part of the novel up, enjoying in particular the two characters who radiate some charm in this dark world of conspiracies and counter-conspiracies, Adam Hardy and the Princess Elizabeth, but I still wouldn't trust either of them as far as I could throw them. Treason is a compelling read and extremely difficult to put down For Winter Nights Jackson, author of bestselling historical novels Blood Rock and Pilgrim, shines a new and exciting light on one of the most momentous events in British history in an enthralling story packed with fascinating history, breathtaking action and a cast of captivating characters both real and fictional... Immaculately researched and teeming with suspense, malice and menace, this is an impressive portrait of the suspicion and intrigue that stalked the early years of James I's reign as well as a thrilling adventure story that will keep readers on their toes from first page to last Lancashire Evening Post I love history. I enjoyed reading about this period in English history (...) I have never read a book specifically on James I, but aim to in the new year (...) The storyline is a plus (...) and the character Christian Hardy is a plus Impresions in Ink

Review

Treason is such a well-written book, its complicated plot kept tightly under control, the dialogue intriguing. The Gunpowder Plot itself is covered in such fascinating, meticulous detail and I lapped this part of the novel up, enjoying in particular the two characters who radiate some charm in this dark world of conspiracies and counter-conspiracies, Adam Hardy and the Princess Elizabeth, but I still wouldn't trust either of them as far as I could throw them. Treason is a compelling read and extremely difficult to put down (For Winter Nights)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 874 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Zaffre (6 Oct. 2016)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01H8XNP9O
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #86,351 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It’s not hard to see why Frederick Forsyth is addicted to James Jackson’s books (a Forsyth endorsement appears on most, quite possibly all, of them, including this latest one, Treason). As in a Forsyth thriller, the orchestration of plot knots your stomach tighter with every page, luring you into the blind, fetid alleys of Jacobean London – thence, for instance, into the low light of a parlour where “the pinched and haggard faces seemed already to belong to the afterlife”... and, of course, down into the cellar beneath Parliament which “was too much like a tomb for comfort”. Given that we know the outcome of the 5th November (just as in Day of The Jackal we know that de Gaulle evades assassination), it’s the sub-plots – the individual confrontations, one of which, almost unbearably, pits Christian Hardy against his estranged son, Adam – that matter most. It’s here that Jackson demonstrates that he is without equal in the genre, not only because of the adroitness with which he shifts focus – from plotter to agents of the Crown and back again – but because of his delineation of character. The plotters are creatures of flesh and blood, led by Robert Catesby, a man of principle, of decency as well as valour; the Crown forces are compellingly human, too, not least James I himself, his decisions variously governed by cunning, fear and lust (“he scratched at his crotch with absent-minded pleasure”). Above all else, though, there is Jackson’s greatest creation: Realm – traitor and psychotic, a man capable of “almost feeling pity”, for whom barbarity is “simply a means, a habit needing to be fed, a store of screaming faces he glimpsed occasionally from afar”. A contemporary figure, in other words, within the higher command of the IRA or Islamic State.Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A bit slow in the middle, but by the end I couldn't put it down. I think it's probably quite historically accurate as well, going from the interview of James Jackson with James O'Brien on LBC recently. I'd certainly recommend it.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Kate TOP 500 REVIEWER on 16 Oct. 2016
Format: Hardcover
Elizabeth I is not long dead. James I, a Protestant, wears the crown and his throne is not yet steady. As far as Spain is concerned, it is still at war with England and surely now is the time for a true Catholic to seize the throne. James has inherited his chief statesman Lord Cecil, his ‘Beagle’, from Elizabeth, rewarding his cunning with an Earldom. A master of intelligence, Cecil has deployed his agents to seek out Catholic plots against the king. One agent in particular, Christian Hardy, is ready, waiting for his great enemy, the appallingly brutal ‘Realm’, to make his move. But in the background a network of Catholics stirs. Secrecy is paramount but one among them is revealed to us as the explosives expert – Guido or Guy Fawkes. It is Guy Fawkes who will light the wick.

Many of us, at least on this side of the pond, remember, remember the 5th of November when Guy (or Guido) Fawkes attempted to blow up James I and his ministers at the state opening of Parliament on 5 November 1605. With the benefit of hindsight, it would seem that the Gunpowder Plot, audacious in the extreme, was doomed to failure from the outset but, during those paranoid days, so soon after the death of Elizabeth I, Catholics and Protestants were more suspicious of each other than ever. The Protestant King was very possibly quite sure that a plot would get him in the end, while the Pope and Spanish King could be confident that their agents and priests, hidden away in the country manors of England’s surviving Catholic aristocrats, would perform fearlessly their ultimate duty for God.

James Jackson’s Treason presents the tangled web of months of intrigue and treachery that led up to 5 November. The narrative flits between our cast, the proceedings laid out before our eyes like a play on a stage.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
With November the 5th coming up this is a well timed title. Having read books about the Tudors and the Civil War this is a different period of history with James as the new King.and the gunpowder plot against him. It shows the use of spies (as used by Elizabeth) and the way they are used to great effect. At times it was hard to keep up with some of the characters (but that is probably just me).
I did not realise the extent of the plot, obviously we all know about Guy but the rest of the plotters and often confined to history. and how they were caught.
This book took a bit of time to take off as it sets the "plot" but it is a great read and if you like a historic novel you are in for a treat.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The narrative sweep of James Jackson's latest historical novel, Treason, is irresistible and the details are constantly arresting and fascinating. He has the gift of making history live again and it has never been better deployed than in Treason. His vivid and powerful work, his impressive research and his extensive knowledge add up to another memorable masterpiece. Here is distinguished writing coupled with flair, panache and serious thought. I can highly recommend this outstanding account of a remarkable period in our history.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Review

This is an excellent, hard and uncompromising novel, Taking the reader through the dark murky world of espionage in England in the early 1600’s. The brutality of the clash of protestant and catholic worlds, all narrowed down to a single plot, an attempted act of terrorism that still resounds through the country today such was its audacity.

James Jackson takes very little mercy on the reader, providing a view of London and wider England in all its filth, muck and mire, with betrayals, backstabbing, murder and mayhem. This is not a gentle time in this lands history and it is right it should be shown warts and all. When the author couples that with a twisting winding plot and disparate hunters many of which controlled by the spider at the center of the web of intrigue Robert Cecil you get a book that grabs you and doesn’t let go until the final page.

A very interesting and very powerful book, highly recommended

(Parm)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover