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Date of Publication: 2010
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Traumatic Politics: The Deputies and the King in the Early French Revolution Paperback – 1 Jan 2009

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"Barry Shapiro's provocative psychological analysis of the 'trauma' induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution--and too good a historian--to be taken lightly."--Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University

"Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive."--Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review

"Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution."--Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review

"Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution's first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times."--David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York

"Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies' ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives' letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies' attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies' fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies' conduct in the Constituent Assembly."--Kenneth Margerison, French History

Barry Shapiro s provocative psychological analysis of the trauma induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution and too good a historian to be taken lightly. Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University"

Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive. Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review"

Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution. Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review"

Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution s first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times. David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York"

Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies conduct in the Constituent Assembly. Kenneth Margerison, French History"

"Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution's first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times."

--David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York

"Barry Shapiro's provocative psychological analysis of the 'trauma' induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution--and too good a historian--to be taken lightly."

--Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University

"Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive."

--Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review

"Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution."

--Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review

"Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies' ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives' letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies' attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies' fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies' conduct in the Constituent Assembly."

--Kenneth Margerison, French History

Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution s first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times.

David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York"

Barry Shapiro s provocative psychological analysis of the trauma induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution and too good a historian to be taken lightly.

Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University"

Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive.

Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review"

Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution.

Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review"

Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies conduct in the Constituent Assembly.

Kenneth Margerison, French History"

Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution s first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times.

David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York

"

Barry Shapiro s provocative psychological analysis of the trauma induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution and too good a historian to be taken lightly.

Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University

"

Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive.

Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review

"

Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution.

Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review

"

Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies conduct in the Constituent Assembly.

Kenneth Margerison, French History

"

"Barry Shapiro addresses in original fashion a classic question about the failure of constitutional monarchy in Revolutionary France. He has mastered the events and debates of the Revolution's first years, but he replaces traditional political and ideological explanations with insights from trauma research. In a work of creativity and daring, he explores the logic and illogic of political decision making in stressful times."

--David G. Troyansky, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York



"Barry Shapiro's provocative psychological analysis of the 'trauma' induced by the French Revolution may not convince every reader. But the analysis itself is both careful and creative. Shapiro is simply too well acquainted with the history of the French Revolution--and too good a historian--to be taken lightly."

--Darrin M. McMahon, Florida State University



"Shapiro has taken an innovative approach, and his arguments are compelling. His coverage of the important debates in the Assembly is impressive."

--Leigh Whaley, American Historical Review



"Shapiro's interdisciplinary analysis opens new perspectives. He notes that the same momentum is observable in modern-day revolutions, this lending credence to his thesis. While most of the material is quoted in English, he has faithfully consulted French sources. His work is readable and persuasive, and hopefully will join the recent scholarship on the French Revolution."

--Mary Helen Kashuba, French Review



"Traumatic Politics is an important book that expands current understanding of the Constituent Assembly. Shapiro is undoubtedly correct in recognising and attempting to explain the deputies' ambivalent and constantly shifting attitudes toward Louis XVI. His sophisticated and careful analysis of the representatives' letters and diaries and the assembly proceedings provides considerable insight into the deputies' attitudes toward the king. His interpretation of the important political debates regarding monarchical authority is illuminating. . . . He has demonstrated the extent of the deputies' fear of royal retribution in the early summer of 1789. He makes a convincing case that one cannot discount the memory of this experience in explaining the deputies' conduct in the Constituent Assembly."

--Kenneth Margerison, French History

About the Author

Barry M. Shapiro is Professor of History at Allegheny College.

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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review
5.0 out of 5 stars Traumatic Politics:The deputies and the King in the Early French Revolution 29 Oct. 2010
By Blitzer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This fascinating book reads like a novel, to try to assess the emotional content of the deputies in the early Revolution. Barry Shapiro has read reams of letters, diaries, and other material to bring each deputy to life. It's refreshing to see how the deputies' letters say one thing to the home front, and another to someone in Paris. This is one of the first books to join an overtly psychological approach to the material now being written about the Revolution. It will fill in an important lacuna in French history. Read it yourself and decide whether Shapiro has made his case or not!
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