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Transgression: A soap star with a secret. A Member of Parliament with a darker one by [Parker, Frank]
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Transgression: A soap star with a secret. A Member of Parliament with a darker one Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 206 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

About the Author

Frank Parker was born and lived in England until he retired in autumn 2006, when he relocated to Ireland, where his son had already made his home. Although drawn to writing since childhood his career as an Engineer, and the need to support his family, limited the amount of time available to practice the craft. With retirement he was able to find time to concentrate on fiction. In recent years he has produced numerous short stories and self-published 3 previous novels. His short stories have appeared in 3 limited edition anthologies. He likes to write about the lives of ordinary people and is especially drawn to periods in history when the struggle to survive was much harder than it is today. The role of politics with a small 'p' in that struggle fascinates him, especially the politics of gender. He believes that women have, in the past, suffered more than men whilst achieving much more than they have been given credit for. He tries to reflect this in his writing. He lives with his wife of 52 years in the Irish midlands.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 610 KB
  • Print Length: 206 pages
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B014N1C1QC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #842,410 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Reviewed by me as part of Rosie Amber's Review Team

This is an intelligently constructed, fairly complex drama that deals with the changing social attitudes of England since the 1970s, written from the points of view of three main characters. It opens with Roger, who has written a book about a recently deceased soap star. He meets a young woman who claims to be the soap star's daughter, which opens up old wounds and secrets from four decades before. Roger is forced to face up to his own guilt about his part in the cover up, which involved family friends and a local MP, and deal with the impact of the revelations on his own relationship.

The book covers many decades, with nostalgia-worthy details in each. I was a teenager in the 1970s, and this book did make me think about how far we have moved on in terms of prejudice and 'the permissive society', as it was called back in those days; sometimes for good, sometimes not so much. As the story goes on, suggestions of historic sexual harrassment are uncovered—very topical and sinister.

I found the subject matter quite interesting to read about; after all, soap operas and dramas themselves are so often based around hidden affairs and secret offspring; you can't go far wrong with a bit of family intrigue of this type! I'm afraid, though, that I found it all a bit flat. The main problem was the dialogue; each character used similar vocabulary, tone, mood and rhythms of speech; I kept forgetting who was who because they all spoke in the same way, the dialogue being mostly used to deliver facts, as was much of the narrative, as opposed to telling a compelling story with atmosphere and emotion.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A good plot line, neatly moving between different decades, keeping me interested as I approach the final chapter
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Seeds We Sow 14 Dec. 2015
By John - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another fine novel from Frank Parker. What are the consequences of a seemingly meaningless sexual romp between a man in his late twenties and a girl in her teens when the encounter leads to the birth of an unacknowledged child? What is the fallout 40 years later, after the girl has become a well-known actress and the man has become a respected Member of Parliament?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How the world has changed since the 1970s... 11 Dec. 2015
By Terry Tyler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Reviewed by me as part of Rosie Amber's Review Team

This is an intelligently constructed, fairly complex drama that deals with the changing social attitudes of England since the 1970s, written from the points of view of three main characters. It opens with Roger, who has written a book about a recently deceased soap star. He meets a young woman who claims to be the soap star's daughter, which opens up old wounds and secrets from four decades before. Roger is forced to face up to his own guilt about his part in the cover up, which involved family friends and a local MP, and deal with the impact of the revelations on his own relationship.

The book covers many decades, with nostalgia-worthy details in each. I was a teenager in the 1970s, and this book did make me think about how far we have moved on in terms of prejudice and 'the permissive society', as it was called back in those days; sometimes for good, sometimes not so much. As the story goes on, suggestions of historic sexual harrassment are uncovered—very topical and sinister.

I found the subject matter quite interesting to read about; after all, soap operas and dramas themselves are so often based around hidden affairs and secret offspring; you can't go far wrong with a bit of family intrigue of this type! I'm afraid, though, that I found it all a bit flat. The main problem was the dialogue; each character used similar vocabulary, tone, mood and rhythms of speech; I kept forgetting who was who because they all spoke in the same way, the dialogue being mostly used to deliver facts, as was much of the narrative, as opposed to telling a compelling story with atmosphere and emotion. A trait I've noticed in many self-published mystery type books with intricate plots is that characters have lengthy conversations in which they discuss the whys and wherefores of a situation, in order to impart chunks of information to the reader, but if the characters have not leapt off the page and become real people, it's hard to care. I also felt that some of the references to social media and popular culture were a little forced.

Having said all that, the writing did improve when it moved onto the second character, Mabel, and more so again I reached the third, Douglas. The book's other good point was that the plot strands worked together well; I didn't find any inconsistencies or parts that weren't feasible, a huge plus. To sum up - it was just okay for me, but I daresay readers who care more about a carefully constructed plot than character connection would enjoy it more.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In-depth read that grabs your attention and doesn’t let go 19 Sept. 2015
By Alicia L. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was forwarded a copy of this book asking for an honest review. So here it is:

A young lady's indiscretion at the beginning of her woman hood launches her on a journey of self- discovery, self-doubt and a struggle with co-dependence as she rises like a star; hometown girl turned celebrity on the small screen.

The man involved in this indiscretion had also done something to her to make her uncomfortable in certain ways around men for many years after, while also leaving her pregnant after the single encounter.

The circumstances and resulting child were hidden immediately with the help of a mutual friend, in order to protect both her potential acting career and his political career and family.

Forty years later those secrets are threatened to be spilled despite the carefully laid plans and also in spite of the biography that was written to keep Madge's life and character cast in a positive light, even after her death.

The story is split between three POV's. Each POV character is well rounded and their personality shines through in their actions and reactions throughout the story. They are built through interaction with the world and people around them, and not through basic descriptions. The story is ultimately about Madge, but you tend to really care for some of the other characters even more as their life story is told. Their involvement in Madge's life is only a part of their story, and the other parts are just as interesting to read about.

The author really shines in his portrayal of human inner thought and reflection. I could really feel how that particular character felt, and see the world through their eyes. His easy way of capturing dialogue kept the story flowing well, and the scenes interesting. The descriptive parts were in depth but kept to the point so as not to go overboard or bore the reader.

This book is out of my "normal" type of read, but I really enjoyed it for all the reasons listed above. The only thing I am left wondering, is what really happened that night that caused Madge to become the person she was?
All in all this is a very in-depth read that grabs your attention and doesn’t let go until you’ve read the last page.
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