• RRP: £25.00
  • You Save: £1.25 (5%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Transformation by Integra... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsmart_usa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean and free of writing and or highlighting. Cover edges show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Transformation by Integration: How Inter-faith Encounter Changes Christianity Paperback – 29 May 2009

3.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£23.75
£16.99 £16.23
£23.75 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Transformation by Integration: How Inter-faith Encounter Changes Christianity
  • +
  • Do We Worship the Same God?
  • +
  • The Im-Possibility of Interreligious Dialogue
Total price: £59.73
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: SCM Press (29 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0334043174
  • ISBN-13: 978-0334043171
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 26.4 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,344,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Professor Perry Schmidt-Leukel is Professor of Systematic Theology and Religious Studies and Chair of World Religions for Peace at the University of Glasgow. He is a specialist in Buddhist-Christian dialogue and a leading proponent of a pluralistic theology of religions.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I am disappointed with this book because it isn’t what I was expecting. The advertising I read led me to believe that it was about people who combine practices from different religions, like Christian who does Zen meditation or a mixed-marriage couple who celebrate Pesach and Easter. As statistics show: a significant number of people in Christian countries engage in spiritual practices from Eastern religions like Yoga, Zen Meditation, Tai-Chi, and that about 20 per cent of at least nominal Christians in the West believe in reincarnation.'… It is reported that Japanese people like to go to Christian churches for marriage but will consult a Buddhist priest for funerals.

However, the author cannot be blamed for his advertisers. This is an academic work that teases out the meanings and implications of ‘tolerance’ and ‘acceptance. About well-meaning local authorities who have a strapline ‘Celebrating Diversity’ he is somewhat pedantic. Diveristy is neutral – there is a diversity of deadly diseases.

Syncretism and inculturation are teased out. Dom Bede Griffiths’ ashram used the Vedas instead of the Old Testament reading at mass and incense was offered in Hindu arati style. I was once accused of syncretism when I used readings from the guru Granth Sahib in Guru Nanak’s birthday and also when I put a statue of Buddha on the altar. How far can we go in learning from other faiths and integrating it into our own spirituality?

After all, each of the major world religions grew and developed by syncretising.

What about conflicting truth claims? Is Jesus the Second person of the Trinity, as Christians say?
Read more ›
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x96af0750) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
HASH(0x969ced20) out of 5 stars repetitive 16 Feb. 2014
By Mr. D. P. Jay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I am disappointed with this book because it isn’t what I was expecting. The advertising I read led me to believe that it was about people who combine practices from different religions, like Christian who does Zen meditation or a mixed-marriage couple who celebrate Pesach and Easter. As statistics show: a significant number of people in Christian countries engage in spiritual practices from Eastern religions like Yoga, Zen Meditation, Tai-Chi, and that about 20 per cent of at least nominal Christians in the West believe in reincarnation.'… It is reported that Japanese people like to go to Christian churches for marriage but will consult a Buddhist priest for funerals.

However, the author cannot be blamed for his advertisers. This is an academic work that teases out the meanings and implications of ‘tolerance’ and ‘acceptance. About well-meaning local authorities who have a strapline ‘Celebrating Diversity’ he is somewhat pedantic. Diveristy is neutral – there is a diversity of deadly diseases.

Syncretism and inculturation are teased out. Dom Bede Griffiths’ ashram used the Vedas instead of the Old Testament reading at mass and incense was offered in Hindu arati style. I was once accused of syncretism when I used readings from the guru Granth Sahib in Guru Nanak’s birthday and also when I put a statue of Buddha on the altar. How far can we go in learning from other faiths and integrating it into our own spirituality?

After all, each of the major world religions grew and developed by syncretising.

What about conflicting truth claims? Is Jesus the Second person of the Trinity, as Christians say? Or is he now, as Muslims say: Sankara applies certain principles in order to avoid inconsistency, in this case the principle of different levels of truth, so that what 'is true of one level is not necessarily true of another level'.

There is an inconsistency in those who say that those who haven’t heard the gospel will not be condemned for rejecting Christ. My answer to this is that we should stop sending missionaries, in case people hear and still reject.

I disagree with the author’s definition of pluralism. In it, he asserts that no one religion is superior to any other. One can be a pluralist yet still rank different religions according to their ethics or their sophistication.
I also disagree with him when he says that some truth claims cancel each other out. That contradicts what he quoted earlier about Sankara’s levels of truth. It also fails to realise that atheism and Christianity neded not be polar opposites. Has he not read Don Cupitt?
I feel that the author is on surer ground when he discusses the relationship between Buddhism and Christianity, his area of particular specialism, though he quotes from Paulo Williams, who is a convert from Buddhism to Roman Catholicism. He asks whether the Christian concept of incarnation is necessarily unique and has an interesting angle on the Council of Chalcedon.

Many of us have tried to ‘get round’ the uniqueness of Jesus as contained in John’s Jesus saying ‘I am the way … noone comes to the Father but by me’ But Jesus says many things such as: 'Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was born, I am'. Here we find the Johannine theme of pre-existence. So is salvation only through Jesus? Or through the pre-existing Christ? If the latter, is not Christ at work on other religions too?

I see little point in the concluding ‘Four frogs’ chapter. However, one interesting account is from a Christian experiencing Buddhist meditation. However, had she and our author known about the history of Christian spirituality, they would have known that her experience echoes Christian mysticism and there is no need to go outside the tradition to find this.

There is a lot of repetition, which makes me wonder whether this material started off as a series of lectures. Finally, the author uses a large amount of words to say very little.
HASH(0x969cee7c) out of 5 stars This excellent book provides a mirror for all who get through it. 18 April 2014
By Ann Wizer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For the truly curious and self reflective reader. Not an easy read but very worthwhile, and very necessary for all those who are willing to look deeply into their own long held beliefs.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback