£4.99
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Tramp Abroad has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

A Tramp Abroad Paperback – 26 Feb 2014

4.1 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£4.99
£4.99 £9.06
£4.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • A Tramp Abroad
  • +
  • The Innocents Abroad (Stanfords Travel Classics)
  • +
  • Life on the Mississippi (Wordsworth Classics)
Total price: £19.06
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 178 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (26 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1496085213
  • ISBN-13: 978-1496085214
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 1 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 494,870 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"["A Tramp Abroad] is delicious, whether you open it at the sojourn in Heidelberg, or the voyage down the Neckar on a raft, or mountaineering in Switzerland, or the excursion beyond the Alps into Italy." --William Dean Howells --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Inside Flap

In "A Tramp Abroad, Mark Twain's unofficial sequel to "The Innocents Abroad, the author records his hilarious and diverse observations and insights while on a fifteen-month walking trip through Central Europe and the Alps. "Here you have Twain's inimitable mix," writes Dave Eggers in his Introduction, "of the folksy and the effortlessly erudite, his unshakable good sense and his legendary wit, his knack for the easy relation of a perfect anecdote, and some achingly beautiful nature writing."
This Modern Library Paperback Classic reproduces the text of the first American edition and features new explanatory notes and a critical Afterword by Kerry Driscoll, professor of English at Saint Joseph College in Connecticut. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
America's post-Civil War years brought a renewed interest in the European scene. Journeys known as Grand Tours led tourists to take ship to the Continent. They fanned out across the landscape with the intent to "know Europe." Their return home resulted in a flurry of published accounts. Twain here satirizes both the tourists and their writings with delicious wit. Ever a man to play with words, his "tramp" refers to both himself and the walking tour of Europe he purports to have made. By the time you've reached the end of the account of the "walking tour" incorporating trains, carriages and barges, you realize that the longest "walk" Twain took occurred in dark hotel room while trying to find his bed. He claims to have covered 47 miles wandering around the room.
Twain was interested in everything, probing into both well-known and obscure topics. His judgments are vividly conveyed in this book, standing in marked contrast to his more reserved approach in Innocents Abroad. A delightful overview of mid-19th Century Europe, Tramp is also interlaced with entertaining asides. Twain was deeply interested in people, and various "types" are drawn from his piercing gaze, rendered with acerbic wit. Some of these are contemporary, while others are dredged from his memories of the California mines and other journeys. He also relished Nature's marvels, recounting his observations. A favourite essay is "What Stumped the Blue-jays." A nearly universal bird in North America, Twain's description of the jay's curiosity and expressive ability stands unmatched. He observes such humble creatures as ants, Alpine chamois, and the American tourist. Few escape his perception or his scathing wit. This book remains valuable for its timeless rendering of characters and the universality of its view. It can be read repeatedly for education or entertainment. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you wish to experience the full range of Mark Twain's prolific story telling capabilities then this is the book for you. It recounts his trip round Europe in the 1870's (when he was in his mid thirties), but is it much more than a mere travelogue.

He does of course cover many factual elements, for example a particular town in Germany which I was able to look up on Google. The photographs show that it has not changed much since Mark Twain was there and his description still applies. Later in the book he cites a famous large painting (in a city in Italy) which again I was able to find on Google and I could follow his account of the various portions of the canvas.

Mixed in with the travelogue are stories of what has happened to him along the way, exaggerations of what may have happened to him, and downright tall stories of what is most unlikely to have happened to him. It is up to the reader to determine which is which. Added to this are acknowledged myths and legends from the current locality. It all makes for a rich and entertaining tapestry of wonderful narrative.

Mark Twain has the ability to make me laugh out loud. He describes in comical detail his excruciating experience of German Opera, his delight in hearing a piano played really badly in a hotel lounge, his infuriation at suffering from insomnia, and his fascination with the behaviour of the common ant - to name but a few instances.

Do not overlook the appendices when you reach the end of the main part of the book. His analysis there of the eccentricities of the German language is glorious and a gem in its own right.

This eBook version has some curiosities. There are the usual handful of printing errors that one might expect to have been eliminated by good proofreading.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After 'Innocents Abroad', this was Mark Twain's second foreign travel book. Both books have 'laugh out loud' moments, and dull passages. The art of 'skipping' bits is particularly useful when reading Mark Twain! To be fair, he was writing in the latter part of the nineteenth century, and his descriptions of European scenery would have been necessary to readers without access to visual media. We might find them boring today, even though they are brilliantly written! I must confess I often used Google Maps and Wiki to check out places he had mentioned! Sometimes just to verify his information, as the book is full of deliberate misinformation and hoaxes! We always have to remember that he is trying to entertain! He can be very serious, but trying to establish if the 'serious' passages are just 'send-ups' is part of the fun in reading Mark Twain! For example, his 'rant' on European and American food, with that extremely long list of American ingredients. Is he serious here? I found it helped to always keep in mind the fact that the book was written in 1879. On a personal note, I have also stayed in Interlaken, and that big hotel is still there, and I can just imagine the dull evenings spent there listening to terrible pianists! Now you can go to the top of the Jungfrau by train! No need to go by telescope! He would have loved that!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have mixed feelings about this one.Sometimes it made me laugh out loud and certain paragraphs are absolute gold - like the one about trying to leave a room without waking up a sleeping friend or climbing a tiny mountain in few days even though it should take few hours max. Unfortunately in between those really funny stories the author takes on a challenge to make you suicidal. The worst parts are those dreadful legends he has to torture us with every so often. Just thinking about them makes me feel a bit down. Also the entire description of university duel clubs was so painfully boring it made me want to abandon the book. But then on the other hand whatever doesn't kill you makes you stronger and the good bits are like I said phenomenal. And I was shortly rewarded with a chapter on the french duel which was fantastic. The only inconsistent thing is that towards the end author's attitiude changes and he becomes quite a stereotypical American he despises - that's when he has quite a lenghty rant about how you can't eat a decent meal in Europe. It didn't match the personality we got to know in the book and seemed a bit hillbilly, but I guess it was supposed to be funny.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback