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Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories by [Barry, Kevin]
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Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

A strong and thought provoking collection. (Sunday Business Post)

Sharp, lively and varied selection ... The range of themes, characters, locations and moods covered in these pages is impressive; there is an inventive uncertainty in its mix of established voices and highly promising new ones, such as those of Mary Costello, Andrew Meehan, Colin Barrett andLisa McInerney. And Barry's creative editing has ensured that, as promised, we can discern here the shape of Irish fiction to come. (Giles Newington Irish Times)

Town & Country flaunts its diversity. The "great, mad and rude new energies" Barry touts in his introduction are certainly present. At its best, this collection sings as well as soars. An unruly chorus of unalike minds. (Tom Adair The Scotsman)

Bursting at the seams with literary talent (Hot Press)

Book Description

With Town and Country: New Irish Short Stories, edited by Kevin Barry, Faber are delighted to present a fourth collection of all new Irish short stories.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 810 KB
  • Print Length: 362 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (28 May 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BVTZ7HA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #151,966 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I chose this book for my Bookclub. i Loved it. It was a great showcase for contemporary short stories .

Particular praise for
Images Dermot Healy,
Earworm Julian Gough,
Saturday Boring Lisa Mc Inerney,
Tiger Michael Harding,
The Ladder Sheila Purdey,
The Clancy kid Colin Barrett,
Joyride to Jupiter Nualla Ni Choncuirr,
How I beat the Devil Paul Murray,
Not so sure about
Barcelona Mary Costello,
The Mark of Death Greg Baxter,
Brimstone Butterfly Desmond Hogan

4 stars because of limitations in technology hard to go back and forth on Kindle , would have been better in book form this time
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Format: Paperback
Contemporary short story collections can be mixed bags; this is definitely more satisfying than most. It's satisfying when a short story works because it's the right length. Julian Gough's Earworm fantasises about an irresistible song that paralyses the world would be silly if it were any longer. Sheila Purdy's second-person narrative The Ladder, for my money the best story in this collection, is one of those stories that microscopically distill a single moment, and in doing so imply a much larger story.
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Format: Paperback
With hardly any duds, this collection can be read straight through for pleasure. Stand-outs are Julian Gough, Nuala ni Chonchur, Patrick McCabe and William Wall, but the younger ones are good too. Plenty of humour and a dearth of priests and rain.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'd thought this was a new collection of Barry's short ... 2 Dec. 2014
By Mary Sojourner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'd thought this was a new collection of Barry's short stories - he is a genius, a writer who doesn't pander to the current readers' market. It is a collection by different authors, among them a challenger for Barry's crown: Colin Barrett. "The Clancy Kid" is real, tender, harsh and so believable. I hope he retains his voice in these days of glitter publishing and I hope there will be many more books by him. He - and Barry - set a standard that harks back to earlier days of quality short fiction.
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother with this collection 21 Aug. 2016
By Desmond Carbery - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Absolutely terrible collection. There are perhaps two, at most, worth reading ...the quality generally though was surprisingly poor. Most somehow or other come across as pretentious and contrived. Much of the dialogue in particular just tries far too hard. When there is so much great stuff coming out of Ireland,such a shame to waste time reading this collection.
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