Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

This title is not currently available for purchase
Tower of Basel: The Shadowy History of the Secret Bank that Runs the World by [LeBor, Adam]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Tower of Basel: The Shadowy History of the Secret Bank that Runs the World Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"

Length: 362 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £4.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deals: Books from 99p
Sign-up to the Kindle Daily Deal email newsletter to discover daily deals from 99p.
Get a £1 credit for movies or TV
Enjoy £1.00 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product description

Review

Edward Lucas, author of "Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today"""Tower of Basel" is essential reading. Meticulously researched and fluently written, it reveals a slice of the modern world's untold history--a gripping tale of covert networks, secret deals and unaccountable, powerful individuals whose decisions shape our lives."

Liaquat Ahamed, author of "Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World""Adam LeBor has written an absolutely fascinating history of the BIS, perhaps the most enigmatic financial institution in the world. The story he unveils of the many skeletons in its closet and its astounding ability to remake itself periodically only add to its mystique.""

"Harold James, professor of history and international affairs, Princeton University, and author of "Making the European Monetary Union""Compelling reading --a masterly depiction of the role of the BIS in the Nazi period and Second World War."

About the Author

Adam Lebor is an author, journalist and literary critic, based in Budapest, who writes for the Economist, The Times (London), Monocle and numerous other publications, and reviews for the Financial Times. He has been a foreign correspondent since 1991, covering the collapse of Communism and the Yugoslav wars, and has worked in more than 30 countries. LeBor has written seven non-fiction books, including the best-selling Hitler's Secret Bankers which exposed Swiss economic complicity with the Third Reich and which was short-listed for the Orwell Prize; a biography of Slobodan Milosevic, now regarded as the standard work on his life, and City of Oranges: Arabs and Jews in Jaffa, which tells the story of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through the lives of Arab and Jewish families and which was shortlisted for the Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize. His first novel, The Budapest Protocol is a conspiracy thriller set during the election campaign for the first president of Europe. The Budapest Protocol is fiction but was inspired by fact - a 1944 US intelligence document known as the Red House Report that revealed the secret Nazi plans for the Fourth Reich.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1917 KB
  • Print Length: 362 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (28 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1610393813
  • ISBN-13: 978-1610393812
  • ASIN: B00BKRW6GI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #298,032 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This in-depth study, based on extensive archival documentation, surveys the history of the BIS, which until recently only a few financial experts had heard about. This institution, protected by extraterritorial privileges, can be seen as a forerunner of the European Central Bank, in that both are transnational banks free from "political interference" by the nations, which is Orwellian doublespeak meaning that they are private organisations operating outside of any democratic control or even accounting scrutiny by third parties, with an agenda of monetary manipulation (referred to in doublespeak as "stability") of national and international policies.
Historically, the BIS had strong links with both the US and National Socialist Germany and the latter's ideological and financial heirs in post-war Europe.
One critique that could be made is that the author could have cited more sources in languages other than English.
Early BIS documents reflect the longstanding paternalistic attitude of the banking elite, its dislike of disclosure and transparency, and its unwillingness to admit making mistakes even when these become self-evident.
Anyone who considers these conclusions to be somehow exaggerated should read the book for themselves.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I used to cover the Bank for International Settlements as a financial journalist in the 1980s, so knew a fair amount of this story. But the immense details Adam LeBor brings shows how deeply involved the BIS was during WWII and immediately afterwards in protecting Nazi interests.

What surprises me is to realise how much American financiers were implicated, both at the head of the BIS and in U.S. companies, banks and legal firms working to keep links with Nazi Germany going while American soldiers were making massive sacrifices on the battlefields against Germany.

Besides concerning the BIS, this book is a fierce indictment of the conduct of American financial interests overall.

The BIS is undemocratic, as LeBor points out, but it is so useful to behind-the-scenes international monetary cooperation, that it is likely to keep on going indefinitely. Some of the quiet measures taken by the BIS to help one crisis or another did impress me, I must admit. But at what moral cost?
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The author Adam Lebor's account of the establishment in 1930 of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) exposes it's shocking and unforgivable willingness to become Adolph Hitler's financial conduit and facilitator, enabling the pillaging of invaded states Gold and Currency Reserves.

As thoroughly researched that the book so well demonstrates with the detailed history of BIS, no real clue is given as to the reason why the then Governor of the Bank of England, Montagu Norman should form such a dubious alliance and deep friendship with Hjalmar Schacht, a fanatical supporter of Hitler and the Nazi Party who served Hitler as President of the central state bank Reichsbank, and as Minister of Economics. It was this 'alliance' that was instrumental in BIS's formation and because of the unaccountable way it had been set up, it allowed the BIS to plunge into the murky world of giving assistance to a state that carried out such illegal, and barbarous acts against great swathes of humanity. It was unforgivable.

After the war, and with widespread alarm at the role played by BIS as an adjunct to the Nazi Party, the Breton Woods Conference in 1944 decided that the BIS should be done away with, and yet somehow with much behind the scenes manoeuvring surprisingly involving John Maynard Keynes, the BIS was allowed to carry on.

Since when, in order to obfuscate the past and to buff up it's image, BIS has 'morphed' into a hybrid mutation as the banker to Central Banks around the world, a self-acclaimed expert in the capital and liquidity ratios held by the commercial banking industry, and some fee earning financial regulatory and monitoring services.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This in-depth study, based on extensive archival documentation, surveys the history of the BIS, which until recently only a few financial experts had heard about. This institution, protected by extraterritorial privileges, can be seen as a forerunner of the European Central Bank, in that both are transnational banks free from "political interference" by the nations, which is Orwellian doublespeak meaning that they are private organisations operating outside of any democratic control or even accounting scrutiny by third parties, with an agenda of monetary manipulation (referred to in doublespeak as "stability") of national and international policies.
Historically, the BIS had strong links with both the US and National Socialist Germany and the latter's ideological and financial heirs in post-war Europe.
One critique that could be made is that the author could have cited more sources in languages other than English.
Early BIS documents reflect the longstanding paternalistic attitude of the banking elite, its dislike of disclosure and transparency, and its unwillingness to admit making mistakes even when these become self-evident.
Anyone who considers these conclusions to be somehow exaggerated should read the book for themselves.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover