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Don't Torture A Duckling [Blu-ray]

4.3 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Florinda Bolkan, Barbara Bouchet, Tomas Milian
  • Directors: Lucio Fulci
  • Language: Italian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Arrow Video
  • DVD Release Date: 14 Aug. 2017
  • Run Time: 128 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0716TGPHH
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,371 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product description

Product Description

From Lucio Fulci, the godfather of gore (The Psychic, The Beyond), comes one of the most powerful and unsettling giallo thrillers ever produced: his 1972 masterpiece Don t Torture a Duckling.

When the sleepy rural village of Accendura is rocked by a series of murders of young boys, the superstitious locals are quick to apportion blame, with the suspects including the local witch , Maciara (Florinda Bolkan, A Lizard in a Woman s Skin). With the bodies piling up and the community gripped by panic and a thirst for bloody vengeance, two outsiders city journalist Andrea (Tomas Milian, The Four of the Apocalypse) and spoilt rich girl Patrizia (Barbara Bouchet, The Red Queen Kills Seven Times) team up to crack the case. But before the mystery is solved, more blood will have been spilled, and not all of it belonging to innocents...

Deemed shocking at the time for its brutal violence, depiction of the Catholic Church and themes of child murder and paedophilia, Don t Torture a Duckling is widely regarded today as Fulci's greatest film, rivalling the best of his close rival Dario Argento. Arrow Video is proud to present this uniquely chilling film in its UK high definition debut.

SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS:

  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentations
  • Original mono Italian and English soundtracks (lossless on the Blu-ray Disc)
  • English subtitles for the Italian soundtrack
  • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing for the English soundtrack
  • New audio commentary by Troy Howarth, author of So Deadly, So Perverse: 50 Years of Italian Giallo Films
  • The Blood of Innocents, a new video discussion with Mikel J. Koven, author of La Dolce Morte: Vernacular Cinema and the Italian Giallo Film
  • Every (Wo)man Their Own Hell, a new video essay by critic Kat Ellinger
  • Interviews with co-writer/director Lucio Fulci, actor Florinda Bolkan, cinematographer Sergio D Offizi, assistant editor Bruno Micheli and assistant makeup artist Maurizio Trani
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Timothy Pittides
  • FIRST PRESSING ONLY: Collector s booklet with new writing on the film by Barry Forshaw and Howard Hughes
  • Customer Reviews

    4.3 out of 5 stars
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    Top Customer Reviews

    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    Good product, arrived quickly.
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    While Fulci is best known for his gory horror outings, this is by far his best movie and shows how adept he is working in the giallo genre. Placing the murder of young boys in a rural Italian setting that the outside world is gradually encroaching upon adds a superb extra dimension to the tragedy. It is with an impressively gentle touch that Fulci deals with the true nature of childhood innocence and the lengths others should go to in order to protect it. The expected red herrings abound - suspects include a village idiot, a drug-addicted city girl, a deranged witch, the local priest and the priest's mother - along with a few bloody scenes that are discernibly Fulci, and his sometimes overly slow pacing might infuriate a few, but the main, surprisingly subtle focus of the movie is a small village under threat from more than a murderer.
    The scenery is as much of a character in this movie as any of the actors, with the breathtaking juxtaposition of the road that brings the corruption of the city into the anachronistic rusticity of the village. And the police and journalists that descend upon the area to find the children's killer cause just as much damage and pain as the murderer.
    While the acting of the children is impressive, it is Florinda Bolkan who is outstanding. Having taken a glacially elegant role in another of Fulci's giallos - A Lizard in a Woman's Skin - she now proves her talents as the mad vindictive witch who has her own reasons for wanting the young boys dead, and the scene in the cemetery when she is confronted by angry villagers is one of the most haunting pieces in cinema ever.
    Both fans of Dario Argento's earlier works and dedicated Fulci fiends should find enough in this wonderful movie to satisfy them.
    Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: DVD
    I haven't spent much time watching giallos, not for any particular reason really; I just haven't got around to them yet. I decided to start (again) with Lucio Fulci's "Don't Torture a Duckling." This is a rare film that I believe Fulci haters will tend to enjoy,

    In a small village in southern Italy, young preadolescent boys are turning up dead from strangulation. Evidence points to a number of possible suspects, especially the local "witch," Martiara (Florinda Bolkan), whose voodoo practices and possible insanity make her a likely candidate. But what about Patrizia (Barbara Bouchet), the bored city girl hiding out after a drug scandal, who now passes the time by flaunting her naked body in front of children? The local Catholic Church, headed by young Don Alberto (The Psychic's Marc Porel) and his mother, Aurelia (Irene Papas), tries to keep the population under control, but even the local police are baffled by the case. A reporter from the north, Andrea (Tomas Milian), comes to investigate and recruits Patrizia to discover some genuinely ugly truths about the quiet provincial town.

    There really isn't much gore except for two scenes; that of a woman being beaten with a chain and a man scraping his face down the side of a cliff (ouch!). This is probably my favorite Lucio Fulci film being that I did not enjoy The House By the Cemetery and Zombi 2 (25th Anniversary Special Edition 2-Disc Set) I enjoyed the acting, especially the man who played the priest, who is a dead ringer for Orlando Bloom (just in looks, though, not in lack of acting skill, thank goodness!). The rest of the cast did an excellent job as well, even the children.

    This is a disturbing film, but not the typical slasher flick. Since it is a giallo, it is more murder-mystery than horror.
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    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    This film is a total classic and it's not only for horror-fans of Lucio Fulci. It is layered and concerned with deep social and cultural issues, like the abuse, power and sexual repression of the Church, the sexual arrogance of the new middle class, the relationship between modernisation and traditional culture in Southern Italy, the interconnection between magic and religion, the scapegoating of women (and of children), and more.... But it succeeds at touching these themes within the typical Giallo style and structure, which make it very compelling and 'fun' to watch. There a few really disturbing scenes... And I don't mean the gory ones. Just go and watch it.
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    Lucio Fulci is considered by some to be a pioneer in exploitation, others often dismissed him as a talentless hack, plagiarising the success of more talented artists. Perhaps most known for his gruesome zombie classics City of the Living Dead, The Beyond, The House By the Cemetery and Zombi 2, Fulci had spent the latter half of his career cementing his reputation as the `godfather of gore.' But a few years before finding international success as a regular on the UK's `video nasty' list, he had directed three dark and seductive giallo thrillers, 1969's Una sull'altra (aka Perversion Story), 1971's Una lucertola con la pelle di donna (A Lizard in a Woman's Skin) and Non si sevizia un paperino (Don't Torture a Duckling), released the following year. Although they would feature the trademark nihilism and brutality which his fans have come to expect, his gialli were also beautifully constructed and nightmarish experiments in twisted narratives and perverse violence.

    In 1970, the Italian film industry would take a dramatic turn and become obsessed with giallo, a type of thriller that had been inspired by old pulp novels of the thirties. Heralded by Dario Argento's brilliant debut film L'uccello dalle piume di cristallo (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage), many filmmakers would suddenly turn to the horror genre and soon the market became flooded with variations of the formula, including Sergio Martino's Lo strano vizio della Signora Wardh (The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh), Aldo Lado's La corta notte delle bambole di vetro (Short Night of the Glass Dolls) and Giuliano Carnimeo's Perché quelle strane gocce di sangue sul corpo di Jennifer? (The Case of the Bloody Iris).
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