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Tomorrow's Table: Organic Farming, Genetics, and the Future of Food Paperback – 8 Jan 2010

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 226 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; Reprint edition (8 Jan. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195393570
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195393576
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 1.8 x 15.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 109,597 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Interspersed with nuggets of science, home made recipes (really) and anecdotes. (Biologist)

About the Author

Pamela C. Ronald is a Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of California, Davis. Raoul Adamchak is the Market-Garden Coordinator at the UC Davis Student Farm.

Customer Reviews

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By F Henwood TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Usually, enthusiasts for organic farming come down against genetically modified foods, or to be more precise, genetic engineering. Genetic modification has been done for millennia, with growers deliberately bred and selected plants for desired traits. This was and can be done without one having to know anything about genetics. Genetic engineering works to alter the genetic make-up of the crop. The former is considered natural and the latter not. This distinction is false. There is nothing natural, on a strict definition of this word, about most of what we grow and eat. But the issue is less to do with science nowadays than the culture wars. This book steps into the crossfire.

It is written by a husband-wife team: one an organic farmer, and the other a plant scientist who has created flood-resistant variety of rice. This is an interesting combination, and presumably as a rare a combination as marriage between an Israeli and a Palestinian. The authors argue for the benefits of organic agriculture as well as genetically-engineered technology but go further than that: they argue that GE crops complement the ideals of the organic movement.

Critics of GE foods claim that the technology is no panacea to the problems of population and food supply. So it isn’t. But neither is organic farming or simply cutting down on waste or redistributing consumption. There is no magic bullet. But the authors convincingly show that GE can be one of the tools we can use to deal with the problem. Crops that can be bred to require less pesticide and water, than can survive greater extremes of heat and cold, and produce better yields and nutrition, are all good things. They can be done and should be done. Such things can be done and the technology has proven benefits elsewhere.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book to add more arguments to both sides of an exam essay on GM crops, and it was very helpful. It is a good book for people who do not know much about the subject in detail, and can be used for oneself to balance those chinese whispers that are heard when topics of such controversy are discussed online by anonymous people with no solid knowledge. There is a nice balance between scientific detail and storytelling, making it easy to read. A controversial connection between two technologies (organic and GM agriculture) is suggested, and by reading about it, much is learned about both pro-GM and anti-GM arguments. Read this!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very interesting, however I really dislike the diary-like style of the book, full of emotional meanderings, descriptions of wheat fields flowing in a sunny afternoon etc. Grates after a while, however the content is interesting and informative. Lots of info on methods of both organic farming and GMO production and thoughts on the prejudice and fears ingrained in people.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 44 reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read 18 Aug. 2014
By Jennie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Overall an interesting book with some good information. The recipes seem a little out of place. I would have preferred more of a discussion on the topic at hand, but as it is I believe the book presents good information in support of GE and organic practices and touches nicely on some of the problems facing both types of agricultural cultivation.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 25 Aug. 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beautifully written, wonderful topic
4.0 out of 5 stars Interested in Organic farming, biotechnology? Good read. 19 Oct. 2014
By M. Mullen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Compelling argument for a third rail between all organic/non-GMO and the use for biotechnology to improve crops for human health.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 6 Mar. 2015
By Regina Ilusiva - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good product and good service.
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 8 Oct. 2014
By Paul M Reeves - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent!
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