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All Tomorrow's Parties (Bridge) by [Gibson, William]
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All Tomorrow's Parties (Bridge) Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

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Product Description

Amazon.co.uk Review

William Gibson's seventh glossy, neon-lit novel is a stylishly complex sequel to his previous two, Virtual Light and Idoru. From Virtual Light there's the potent image of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge transformed into a vertically stacked shanty-town with its own bohemian autonomy, outside the law. Idoru provides the magical Japanese media idol ("idoru") Rei Toei, a gorgeous lady existing only in software--as yet. Gibson links these worlds with his usual glowing, plausible vision of deadly streetwise realities intersecting with on-line data flow. One man attuned to the net can sense from his cardboard-box home in Tokyo that major changes loom. A Zen assassin stalks San Francisco and the unlucky ex-cop hero from Virtual Light must assemble some very strange equipment. Further objects of desire include lovingly described knives, guns and even antique mechanical watches, as collected by Gibson himself (who pursues them through online auctions)--the ability to trace watches across the net is crucial to tracking the arch-villain. All the world's clocks are ticking in a countdown to transformation and to chrome-polished scenes of extreme violence as zero-hour nears. Multiple storylines meet and dovetail with deft, witty understatement and, in one case, a charming joke. Vintage Gibson, with enough artful backfill that you needn't read the prequels--but they're great fun too. --David Langford

Amazon Review

William Gibson's seventh glossy, neon-lit novel is a stylishly complex sequel to his previous two, Virtual Light and Idoru. From Virtual Light there's the potent image of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge transformed into a vertically stacked shanty-town with its own bohemian autonomy, outside the law. Idoru provides the magical Japanese media idol ("idoru") Rei Toei, a gorgeous lady existing only in software--as yet. Gibson links these worlds with his usual glowing, plausible vision of deadly streetwise realities intersecting with on-line data flow. One man attuned to the net can sense from his cardboard-box home in Tokyo that major changes loom. A Zen assassin stalks San Francisco and the unlucky ex-cop hero from Virtual Light must assemble some very strange equipment. Further objects of desire include lovingly described knives, guns and even antique mechanical watches, as collected by Gibson himself (who pursues them through online auctions)--the ability to trace watches across the net is crucial to tracking the arch-villain. All the world's clocks are ticking in a countdown to transformation and to chrome-polished scenes of extreme violence as zero-hour nears. Multiple storylines meet and dovetail with deft, witty understatement and, in one case, a charming joke. Vintage Gibson, with enough artful backfill that you needn't read the prequels--but they're great fun too. --David Langford

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 825 KB
  • Print Length: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (5 Oct. 2000)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140266135
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140266139
  • ASIN: B002RI9284
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #58,830 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I finished it a couple of weeks ago, and it inspired me to re-read Virtual Light (Idoru will be next).
The thing is, while I can remember lots of little facets: ideas, locations, characters, and events, the main thrust of the plot is gone from my mind. Perhaps this is the nature of Gibson :-)
The chapter lengths are *very* short, making for a staccato read. Not a problem, but perhaps that's part of what makes the overall picture so hard to appreciate and remember.
It was nice to meet Rydell and Chevette again, and the bridge was (once more) a fascinating place to visit.
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Format: Paperback
Unlike his earlier works, in which each book stands almost alone, this book makes many references to Idoru and Virtual Light and uses several of the characters. It brings those stories together in the way we've come to expect from Gibson:- partly obscure and philosophical, partly very real and likely future vision. There isn't much actually happens overall, as a story, but the way several threads of narrative are followed as they combine towards the end, remeniscent of Mona Lisa Overdrive, make the book strangely compelling. For those who've never read Gibson before, be warned that none of his books are designed for skim-reading, you have to pay attention and think about what is written! With inescapable streetwise style, solid characters, a disturbingly likely view of the future, and even some dark humour, this is a good addition to the Gibson collection.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I think you have to trust Gibson, the initial chapters seem unconnected, but do come to a satisfactory conclusion. I'm going to read this again to appreciate the nuances I missed first time round. A brilliant book.
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Format: Paperback
In my view, All Tomorrows Parties could almost be called a short stories collection. Yes, there is a plot, but mostly it's really just ignored. Instead, Gibson concentrates on describing his visions of the future, which are absolutely stunning in both detail and depth, and could even be called his best yet. Needless to say, I loved it.
And by the way, this book has some great stuff for you fellow gamemasters out there :)
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Format: Paperback
This is a magnificent novel displaying everything William Gibson is good at to its fullest effect. A stylish and intelligent thriller of the near future, it shows a writer on top form and pulling off the frankly disconcerting trick of thrilling his readers to their very core while sticking to a beautifully measured, effortless prose. It's like a public speaker whipping an audience to a frenzy without so much as breaking a sweat or even raising his voice.

The closing part of what is now known as Gibson's Bridge trilogy, All Tomorrow's Parties is set in the early 21st Century. Its most prominent feature is the ruined San Francisco - Oakland Bay bridge which has been replaced by a tunnel made possible by nanotechnology, and is now home to a bustling shanty town for those with nowhere else to go, people with no official status, illegal and semi-legal businesses and various other inhabitants of a twilight world. We are taken as well to Japan, where a pharmaceutically-damaged savant with a talent for data analysis (Laney from the second book in the trilogy, Idoru) picks up a worrying trend and an obsession with a leading media baron. The story also pulls in Chevette, the cycle courier protagonist of the first Bridge novel, Virtual Light, and Berry Rydell also appeared in the first. A very strange mercenary working for the media baron also comes into the mix.

What emerges is a dangerous game of cat-and-mouse played out in and around San Francisco and the Bridge community. Laney leads a gang of vigilante hackers in an attack on the established corporate order while the mercenary, lethal and on the edge, tries to shut them down.
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By Jeremy Walton TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 Nov. 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the final part of Gibson's Bridge trilogy; I enjoyed reading Virtual Light, the first one in the series many years ago - and have only a hazy recollection of its contents - but have yet to read Idoru, the second instalment. I didn't think that those omissions affected my appreciation of this book, although a more joined-up reader would doubtless be pleased to learn more about Chevette and Berry (from Virtual Light) and Laney and Rei Toei (from Idoru).

Gibson writes this history of the near future using very short chapters, presenting snapshots of characters and events in a scattered fashion which, coupled with his allusive style, can make this book feel like a collection of interweaving short stories rather than a coherent novel. In addition, as is common in science fiction, neologisms and technical labels are tossed around without any elucidation, and the reader is supposed to work out what they mean - for example, Laney is obsessed with "nodal points in history, of some emerging pattern in the texture of things" (p56), which sounds like something you could understand if the time was taken to explain it to you. Of course, these lacunae may be part of the impression of uncertainty and alienation that the author wants to convey about this world, but perhaps a firmer guiding hand would have been useful in places - for example, in what I suppose was the climax on p266, where the baddie gets his come-uppance (or seems to, anyway).
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