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Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy [DVD] [2011]

3.7 out of 5 stars 700 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt, Toby Jones
  • Directors: Tomas Alfredson
  • Format: PAL, Anamorphic, Widescreen, Dolby, Digital Sound
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Studiocanal
  • DVD Release Date: 30 Jan. 2012
  • Run Time: 122 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (700 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00505QASQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,777 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy finds George Smiley (Gary Oldman), a recently retired MI6 agent, doing his best to adjust to a life outside the secret service. However, when a disgraced agent reappears with information concerning a mole at the heart of the service, Smiley is drawn back into the murky field of espionage. Tasked with investigating which of his trusted former colleagues has chosen to betray him and their country, Smiley narrows his search to four suspects - all experienced, skilled and successful agents - but past histories, rivalries and friendships make it far from easy to pinpoint the man who is eating away at the heart of the British establishment.

An acting masterclass from the crème de la crème of British film (Colin Firth (The King's Speech), Tom Hardy (Inception), Mark Strong (Kick Ass), Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) and inspired direction from Let the Right One In’s Tomas Alfredson make this gripping and tense adaptation of John le Carré’s classic spy novel essential viewing.

From Amazon.co.uk

Adapted from John le Carré’s uniquely British 1973 espionage novel, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is set in the analogue conditions of the Cold War, a time when cassette tape and Telex were your only gadgets and where middle-aged spies exchanged looks of cordial hatred--and the occasional loyalty--like Bond and Bourne exchange weapons, women and warm locations. Gary Oldman (Leon, Batman Begins, The Dark Knight) plays George Smiley, the former agent who’s called in from the cold to hunt down one of his own--a Soviet mole in the top ranks of the leaky secret service that runs MI5 and MI6. Once inside, his investigations are simultaneously professional and deeply personal: digging around for one double-crossing colleague selling secrets to the Russians only unearths another sleeping with his wife. Le Carré’s London hasn’t been updated so much as back-filled with autumnal 1970s design: brown and pumpkin patterns upholster the shabby little rooms and crooked staircases through which the spies pursue each other, while the supporting cast--John Hurt, Colin Firth, Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hardy, Kathy Burke, Mark Strong and a porcine Toby Jones--is regularly squeezed, often several titans of British cinema at a time, into cramped British cars or shelf-sized offices. George Smiley has a natural home in Oldman, who, like Smiley, has a self-effacing control of his craft--hiding himself in outrageous villains or declining a credit entirely, as he did in Ridley Scott’s Hannibal. With its atmospheric drab and novelistic pace, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is the kind of chamber-piece that suits showy ensemble performances, but Oldman’s turn as Smiley is the most subtle in recent history. --Leo Batchelor

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
First off, I want to say that I own the book, the 7 part Tv series, the BBC4 audiobook and this DVD of the film. I'm not trying to make out, I'm some kind of expert, (I know I'm not!), but to make the point that each is unique and has to be judged on its own merits. They are all in a different medium and are distinct, although the source material is obviously the same. I mean what is the point of critically comparing any film to its book?
Anyway, I approached this film in that way, on its own merits and I think it is very accomplished. The acting on show is first class, with turns from Firth, Hurt, Cumberbatch and Toby Jones and Tom Hardy. At the centre, Oldman is very good as the introspective, cerebral, Smiley. There is a terrific little scene early on, in a car, where there is a wasp or bee buzzing around inside the vehicle. Whereas the other occupants flap their arms around trying to shoo it away, Smiley simply watches it and calmly opens his window to let it fly out. It nicely frames the character of the man in a simple scene with no dialogue.
The identity of a spy in MI6 is slowly revealed as Smiley, methodically, pieces the clues together.
(As a side note, the lives of these people really don't seem very appealing to me at all. just a life of suspicion and subterfuge, with a bit of paranoia and loneliness thrown in, at no extra cost).
I gave it 4 stars out of 5, not as a film adaptation of a book, but as a film. It is very well made, the acting is top-notch and it has a gripping story. Ticks the boxes for me.
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Format: DVD
Why compare this 2 hour film with the 6 hour serial, or require it to be a precise rendition of a book of more than 400 pages? I thought it a fine attempt to take many plot threads and make two hours of entertainment from them, I enjoyed items that were not present in the book. I do wonder though how the following books will be filmed now that Guillam's character has been changed.

Firstly, there are no explosions, chases, babes or helicopters (as if any potential viewer didn't know that) so be prepared to sit, watch and think rather than expect action and glitz to flow over you. Sure, there are some holes and inconsistencies; I suppose that I take a less forensic view to viewing films than do many of the reviewers here.

I don't care that we don't see the characters build to point the way to the identity of the mole because for me the identity of the mole is immaterial. This is about loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice. A few examples:
* Guillam ends his relationship immediately on considering that it might be used against him, quite a sacrifice in my opinion.
* A terrific moment of acting as Smiley makes a deal with Tarr that he knows will violate Tarr's trust because he can't fulfil the spirit of the deal.
* What a strange world where someone who makes such a sacrifice for their country ends up living in a caravan and teaching at a boarding school after being bunged only a few quid and a car.

There were some nice juxtapositions that made me think of how fragile lives might be and the fine line between normality and hardship.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
That was the reaction of the family when I showed this over Christmas. I had two advantages over them (a) I'd seen it before, and (b) I'd read the book many years ago, so I could remember the bare bones of the plot. I enjoyed the film and the way it recreated the Cold War era of my youth and early adulthood, the whole sepia-toned perplexing atmosphere of the thing and the excellent actors (some of whom really had only bit parts). I guess that, when compressing a complex book into a 2-hour film, something's gotta give.

The family also enjoyed the cinematic experience - what they did not enjoy is the plot, which they only barely discerned. They knew there was a mole at the top of the Circus, they saw that the mole was unearthed, but they couldn't figure out how the film got from one to the other. They were perplexed by the flashbacks, not being at all sure that that's what they were, or how they fitted into the scheme of things. They were totally bewildered by the singing of the Soviet National Anthem at the Christmas party (a frill absent from the book)! In short, it was a film that they could tick off as having seen, but which didn't enthuse them. (We are talking here about a family all of whom have university degrees and are very literate). To them, it came across as a series of discrete tableaux, each beautifully realised, but which didn't seem to hang together at all.

I can see their point, which makes me wonder why the plot couldn't have been made clearer. Was it destined only for hardened Le Carré fans? For pseudo-intellectuals who can read into it whatever they want? The moral of the story is, if you haven't seen it, either read the book or watch the longer BBC serialisation with Sir Alec Guinness as George Smiley. You then stand a fighting chance of coming out of the experience with a reasonable feeling that you haven't wasted your money.
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