£18.72 + £1.26 UK delivery
In stock. Sold by Newtownvideo_EU

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Tim's Vermeer [Blu-ray] [2013] [US Import]

4.4 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

Price: £18.72
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Newtownvideo_EU.
4 new from £15.51 5 used from £29.14

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Tim's Vermeer instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£18.72 In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Newtownvideo_EU.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Note: Blu-ray discs are in a high definition format and need to be played on a Blu-ray player.

  • Important Information on Firmware Updates: Having trouble with your Blu-ray disc player? Will certain discs just not play? You may need to update the firmware inside your player. Click here to learn more.



Product details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Portuguese, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Thai, English, Spanish
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00J5LXN2M
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 136,679 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Paul Allaer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 1 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD
"Tim's Vermeer" (2-13 release; 80 min.) brings the story of Tim Jenison, an inventor who has amassed a small fortune over his life time and now has become fascinated (obsessed may be the better word) with the 17th century Dutch master painter Johannes Vermeer. Tim examines in particular Vermeer's painting "The Music Lesson", which has an astonishing amount of details in it. Tim eventually comes to the conclusion that Vermeer used a variety of optical devices (mirrors, camera obscura, lenses), and to test his theory, he decides to recreate "The Music Lesson" from scratch, even though he is not a skilled painter by any means. To tell you more would ruin your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Couple of comments: first, this documentary is made (and narrated) by Penn, he of Penn & Teller. Turns out that Penn and Tim have known each other for many years, and it's easy to see why this particular topic would have peaked Penn's interest enough to make it into a documentary. Second, the feeling of the documentary is pretty much one of a crime caper, in that we get to find out in detail how Tim goes about testing his various theories and his recreation of "The Music Lesson". Third, if you don't care for art, in particular painting, save yourself the trouble and catch another movie, as obviously the entire 'raison d'être' of the documentary is the making of a painting. At some point during his recreation of the painting, Tim gives an exhausted look towards the camera and sighs "it's like watching paint dry", much to the delight of the theater's crowd, which exploded in laughter.
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Firstly, I'm reviewing the film, which I saw as part of the Ilkley film festival, not the dvd.

This film explores the thread begun by Philip Steadman Vermeer's Camera: Uncovering the Truth Behind the Masterpiecesand taken up by David Hockney Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering the lost techniques of the Old Mastersthat Vermeer used optical technology to enable him to paint using subtleties of tone that the eye/brain is incapable of distinguishing simply by looking at an object or space.

Using a blend of camera obscura-like technology and a carefully angled mirror, Tim Jenison, an inventor and video processing expert, paints a remarkably accurate replica of Vermeer's 'The Music Lesson': it takes him about 130 days to paint the picture and almost as many before that to produce an almost fetishistically accurate physical copy of the room in which the picture was painted. Tim makes all the furniture, paints, lenses himself, and this aspect of the film becomes a little repetitive and helps to channel the film too much away from Vermeer and too much towards Tim as our OCD hero. (I'm glad he actually bought the carpet, as this would have extended the set up section even more!)

This is very interesting, albeit at times a little irritating, and edges the story too much towards 'Novice Painter Paints Like A Master' and the fallacious conclusion that knowing how Vermeer 'did it' makes him a less remarkable artist, at least for the less art savvy viewer. This is not addressed clearly or directly enough.
Read more ›
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I have studied Vermeer for a number of years and expected to hate this film but it pleasantly suprised me as a serious, well made valid contribution to the Vermeer debate. It makes a possibly dry subject accessible but doesn't dumb down which is no mean achievement. It has long been known that optical devices were used by artists and the film illustrates a very plausible theory. Vermeer's technique may be explained, as one dissects the structure of a poem or a film as in one of those fashionable screenplay seminars, but ultimately we are still left with the mystery of his unique genius
and poetic vision. If you want to understand Vermeer I suggest that you read Z Herbert's story, Letter, in the collection Still Life with a bridle, that says everything you ever need to know about the artist in a few pages, written by one genius about another.
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having watched various DVDs of Tim's Vermeer I have to say first of all that it is most important to find the original full length version as there are alternative versions around (e.g. the Italian one ) which have cut/edited many of the most interesting parts of the project out. A prime example being Tim finding the exact town and room that Vermeer used to paint this picture. This is such a shame as there will be many people who will not have realised that they have seen the edited version and will inevitably reach a conclusion and form an opinion which would otherwise have been different.
All in all this project proves beyond doubt that Vermeer (and many other artists) used early camera technology in producing their work. This is not cheating but merely using the best tools for the job at that point in time.

A truly fantastic and insightful story and documentary. Just make sure you get and watch the full and unedited version to fully appreciate the whole concept.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Customer Discussions



Feedback