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Time & Tide

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

Price: £30.82
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Product details

  • Audio CD (29 April 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner
  • ASIN: B00002516E
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 261,044 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 26 Mar. 2001
Format: Audio CD
The last album from the original Greenslade does indeed feel like a lightweight afterthought, but this lends it a charming and unique lack of conceit. Animal Farm, Newsworth, The Flattery Stakes and The Ass's Ears are ridiculously catchy and memorable keyboard-driven pop/rock songs, and the rest of the record is never less than intriguing. Dave Lawson's lyrics are intelligent and concise, though putting the boot into the music press can't have helped their profile! An unpretentious and thoroughly enjoyable listen.
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By A Customer on 15 Aug. 2000
Format: Audio CD
My perennial feeling about this album remains, after many years that it promised much more than it delivered. While the material is good, it seems to be a short offering, almost like a band with some good material ready for the next album but only putting this one out to meet the contract. Nice contrasts between the sombre "Time" and the more eclectic "Tide", while doldrums effectively conveys the idea of slow aimless drifting with no end in view. What a pity the band broke up when it did. Hope they get back together someday!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Some might regard TIME AND TIDE as a footnote in the Greenslade discography, but it's arguably their finest half hour. Gone is the pompous keyboardinging of the earlier albums, which have their merits but nowadays seem more than a tad dated. TIME AND TIDE keeps everything short and snappy; there are no overlong solos, no pretentious whimsical lyrics, it's all sharp and to the point. Dave Lawson was always Greenslade's undersung master but was overshadowed on the earlier releases by Dave Greenslade's well-intentioned but directionless keyboard noodling. On the previous very underrated album SPYGLASS GUEST Lawson emerged with the beautifully structured jazz-rock ballads 'Little Red Fry-Up', 'Rainbow' and 'Red Light'. Here again on TIME AND TIDE Dave Lawson's literate lyrics and anguished vocals and snappy tunes (co-written with Dave Greenslade) come to the fore in a succession of memorable ballads that are among the best of the 70s progressive era. 'Doldrums' is a gorgeous piece of atmospheric gloomy songwriting that ranks with the best of Peter Hammill's and Gentle Giant's work of the time and is probably the outstanding track that Greenslade ever cut to vinyl. Elsewhere on the album Dave Greenslade's keyboards are reigned in to good effect; even his instrumental pieces are spare and all the better for it. This is prog rock cut back to the bone, unashamedly melodic, fleet of foot, savvy, concisely intelligent....Topographic Oceans in a teacup....Greenslade were always regarded as Division 2 prog rock but this overlooked gem of an album was up there with the best of them. I have been humming these tunes for many many years and you will too...

PS: Listen to the mellotron-drenched 'Tide' on this album and then listen to the mellotron-like episodes on Joy Division's 'Decades' (from the album Closer). Surprisingly similar?
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Probably one of the most underrated Prog Rock bands of the '70s, this is Greenslade's final studio album and features the change in line up from Tony Reeves on bass, to Martin Briley. I saw Greenslade live 3 times - twice with Reeves and the last time (at the Chalk Farm Roundhouse - Lemmy was the support act!) with Briley. Whilst I have always been a fan of Tony Reeves' melodic and complex bass lines (Listen to "Melange" from Greenslade's eponymous first album), Martin Briley's rasping Rickenbacker seems somehow to be the right fit for the numbers on this album. There are some real gems on this album. Dave Greenslade's multiple Mellotrons on "Tide" is a remarkable example of how to use this temperamental piece of kit. Personally, I'd say Dave Greenslade was up there with Rick Wakeman and Tony Banks as a Mellotron exponent. Dave Lawson's leaning towards the ARP Synthesizer is clear from the off, with "Animal Farm" but his soaring ARP solo on "Gangsters" really does demonstrate the art of using an analogue Synthesizer. Lawson's vocals I guess are not everyone's cup of tea, but personally I thought his lyrics and singing added significantly to the band. If you really want to hear how to ruin a decent track, listen to the re-arranged "Gangsters" (it's a freebe on the iTunes version of Dave Greenslade's "Cactus Choir") which does away with Lawson's ARP solo, and has lyrics, sung, clearly in agony, by Chris Farlowe! Total Rubbish. Finally, Andrew McCulloch again demonstrates why he was considered to be up there with the likes of Bill Bruford as a Jazz/Rock Drummer. The sailing fraternity in Greece gained and Prog Rock lost when McCulloch hung up his sticks!
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By Andy Millward VINE VOICE on 19 Feb. 2003
Format: Audio CD
Unlike previous Greenslade albums, Time and Tide avoided rambling epics and was instead filled with short and snappy numbers of variable quality. The best are stunningly good, not least the theme song to the TV series Gangsters (sadly the instrumental version here), Animal Farm, the Asses Ears, Newsworth and the Flattery Stakes. The single Catalan is a bright and breezy instrumental. Other tracks pass by unnoticed!
Worth a listen at any time!
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