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Tigerman Audiobook – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 13 hours and 51 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audio
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 22 May 2014
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00K2NRLYI
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book by a great writer.
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Format: Paperback
I read "Tigerman" for my book group and it has rocketed straight into the list of my favourite books ever.

I came to this book having never heard of Nick Harkaway and I finish it resolved to read the rest of his books.

Hats off Nick Harkaway. A stunning achievement. A book that boasts a compelling plot, humour, originality, prescient observations on the modern world, love, humanity, politics, duty, and more.

"Tigerman" takes place on the island of Mancreu, in the Arabian sea, an ethnic melting pot, during the end of days, where the protagonist Sergeant, Lester Ferris, has a watching brief. What could possibly go right? Not much. The less you know the better, suffice it to say...

...Nick Harkaway has created an alternate universe - immersive, amusing, poignant, profound, compelling, charming, and more than a little askew - both very familiar and somewhat strange, which reminded me of both China Miéville and Magnus Mills which, you probably don’t need me to tell you, is a very good thing.

Trust me, "Tigerman” is very special indeed, and an absolute delight.

5/5
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Format: Kindle Edition
An original concept and a captjvating story: humorous, touching, amusing and disturbing in equal measure. The author has a splendid imagintion and a great knack for spinning a ripping yarn. This book is one hunner ten procent awesomeness. (You need to read it to get that last sentence.)
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Format: Hardcover
“ON THE STEPS of the old mission house, the Sergeant sat with the boy who called himself Robin, and watched a pigeon being swallowed by a pelican.”

The Sergeant himself is on his way to become a local Batman, who as one would have guessed from the title, will be called Tigerman. The boy will remain the boy, though the Sergeant will find a name for him closer to the end of the novel. As a pair, the Sergeant and the boy fight evil of a undefined type, since the source of evil is often uncleared, as it often is if it’s a matter of global politics where good and evil not easily recognizable. As just local people, and on the island of Mancreu everyone is local and alien from somewhere else, the Sergeant and the boy are hardly in need of names. They remain symbols, of a wanderer, wounded and faithful to the Crown, being an army vet, semi-retired, and of a child in need of a proper parent, or so it seems.

The heroes are introduced at the beginning, and the place also plays a significant role in the book. Mancreu has no proper government, being a former colony in post-colonial time when it already doesn’t matter who governs whom. “In theory, of course, the British presence here had been withdrawn three years ago, claims of sovereignty having been yielded to the NATO and Allied Protection Force on Mancreu, NatProMan.” The Sergeant serves here a role of an observer, and there is nothing really to observe, except to keep your routine, eat, talk with the boy. The Sergeant is in position when he just needs to do nothing until the island is liquidated, and the rumors going from the start of the novel have it that the island will be eventually destroyed. There will come Leaving time, and one just ups and goes home.
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By D. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Jun. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Lester Ferris (Sergeant) is the last vestige of British officialdom on the former island colony of Mancreu, which lies in the ocean somewhere east of Aden and is to be demolished shortly to save the world from a potential "extinction level event" involving toxic waste and mutant bacteria. In the meantime, the place is a legal No-Man's-Land, and taking advantage of this, governments, security services and various shades of crook have rolled up in ships ("the Fleet") to do whatever they wish, outside the reach of the law. The Fleet is ignored, though everyone knows it's there: "Round and around and around it went, and he chose not to look too closely because if he did he must, inevitably, see things which were invisible."

Against this background, the book follows the relationship between Lester and the Boy. Having seen what happens to refugees displaced from their homes, Lester wishes to adopt the Boy and give him a better life. But first he needs to be sure that the Boy has no-one else. Of course he can't ask outright, for fear of the damage to their friendship, so Lester starts investigating.

At around the same time, a group of men come through the door of a bar one day with guns and kill another man, changing Mancreu for ever. It seems that as the island enters its last days, law and decency is breaking down ("Everyone on the island walked within bounds out of sheer habit, respected property and persons and decency because they knew those things were important. But there was no compulsion any more...") and the values of the Fleet are coming ashore. Will Lester, as the sole police presence, be able to stop the disorder, find out the truth about the Boy and solve the murder?

This is a funny, touching and endearing novel with many twists.
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By SueKich TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Nick Harkaway has more imagination in his little fingertip than most authors have in their entire brain. Here, Sergeant Lester Ferris winds down to retirement as the sole representative of the Crown on ex-colony Mancreu, a remote and tiny doomed island in the Arabian Sea. He befriends a street kid, unnamed, and together they witness the brutal murder of a mutual friend, catapulting them into a maelstrom of politics, drug-dealing, revolt and mayhem. Or as Harkaway puts it, "a Total Goatf***".

I loved The Gone-Away World, didn't care for Angelmaker and thoroughly enjoyed Tigerman. It's inventive, humorous and lots of fun. On the downside, there was far too much repetition about Lester's fatherly love for the boy and the way he goes about his plan to adopt the kid doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Also, the big reveal is obvious from a long way off. But other than these quibbles, this is a terrifically entertaining read and I enjoyed casting Lester Ferris for the screenplay. Dominic West, I reckon. Or maybe Jason Isaacs. Either would work for me ;)
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