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A Tiger Rose Out of Georgia: Tiger Flowers - Champion of the World Hardcover – 2 Jan 2014

4.0 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Fonthill Media (2 Jan. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781552703
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781552704
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 2.3 x 24.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 759,047 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

When Tiger Flowers was starting out as prizefighter in the segregated business of boxing, black men were being lynched on the roads he travelled and the Ku Klux Klan, the "invisible empire", was a force in the American south. Flowers fought for the first time for money in 1918, became the first black man to win the world middleweight title in 1926, and the following year, four days after his 159th fight, he died during a routine operation to remove scar tissue from above his eyes. According to a startling and raw new biography, A Tiger Rose out of Georgia by Bob Mee, Flowers travelled 77,629 miles by car and train from 1922-27 for dozens of fights. The facts regularly defy logic: Flowers must have been part-pugilist, part-freak to have survived as long as he did. The relentless schedule inside the ring was matched by a mesmerising itinerary on America's fledgling roads and railroad lines, as Flowers went from fight to fight with seldom more than a week between bells. Flowers was abused by judges and referees and ignored because of his colour for too long and Mee never once, during the tricky compilation of the book, found one instance of anger, hate or retaliation attributed to Flowers. It was not so much a colour line, as Mee points out in the starkest of language, but a colour wall and the gentle fighter never lost his cool. Flowers finally gets his world title fight against the great Harry Greb, a rare white champion who was prepared to fight a black man, in February 1926 at the old Madison Square Garden. It's a savage brawl with fouls in every round and at the end Flowers gets a tight decision. It was a mixed crowd, something that Flowers, more than any other black fighter is given the credit for making a reality, though he did mostly appear on "blacks only" fight nights the "merry-go-round of the black circuit". Inevitably, the same names come up and he met some men five and six times, doing 65 rounds with Jamaica Kid and taking on a Detroit slugger called Whitey Black three times. Flowers had met Greb in a non-title fight in the summer of 1924 and Greb insisted the "no-decision rule was in place". Greb kept his title but Flowers won easily according to the ringside gathering and that meant he would be kept waiting for his title chance. The month after that first fight with Greb it was back to the road and Flowers would fight 46 times in 18 months of "keeping busy" before taking the title. Flowers beat Greb in a rematch, lost to Mickey Walker the following year in what was probably a fix and was busy up until the very end. His funeral in Atlanta was a big event for both black and white citizens and two streets in the Georgian city carry the name of its greatest fighter. The death of Flowers is given a literary autopsy in the book and Mee's exploration of the operating quack's credentials even raises considerable doubt over the cause of Tiger's death, which came at a time when he was close to getting a chance to fight for his old title against Walker. It would not be a good boxing book without a tiny tale of mob involvement. Mee is insanely thorough and uncovered many new details, including a blockbuster twist at the end that previous writers had failed to discover during decades of seemingly endless fascination with Flowers. The final thrilling reveal took my breath away and, having worked at ringside with Bob for nearly 30 years, I knew what it would mean to him. It is a book packed with love and when you can say that about a boxing book you know it is worth reading. --Steve Bunce - The Independent. 23rd January 2014

About the Author

Bob Mee has written about boxing since the 1970s, is a longstanding member of the Sky Sports boxing team, a former boxing correspondent of the Daily Telegraph and a columnist for trade paper Boxing News. A previous book, Liston & Ali, was long-listed for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year prize in 2010. He lives in Warwickshire.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a wonderfully well researched and written book about a boxer many of us have sadly never heard of. The author skilfully provides a good level of context and details so the reader can really understand the difficult path Tiger Flowers had to follow. It is a real bonus that the author provides a good level of interesting information about the characters around the boxing world at the time when Tiger was fighting.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Written with care and highlighting the racial background to Flowers's achievements. Flowers deserved a good biographer and now has one.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An interesting little biography of the lesser known of the two black southpaws who claimed the undisputed middleweight title in the twentieth century.Tiger a deeply religious man involved in the tough world of boxing.Even though boxers of that era fought a lot more frequently than they do today I got the impression in reading the book that Tiger was used by managers and promoters as a cash cow.
Boxing on without respite despite his colour managed to become world champion a tremendous achievement because of the prejudice black boxers faced and defeating Harry Greb no less.When Tiger died at such a young age the author tells of the tributes paid to him and he quotes GeneTunney and describes Tunney as classy and underated.I got the impression that he meant not just as a boxer but as a man which appears to be strange as it is well known he refused to box black boxers all his career and right up until his death in 1978 regularly came out with quite racist comments.The author refers to Harry Greb as being agricultural in style that's strange considering he pounded out a 15 round decision over Tunney yes he lost the rematch but their third match was close with a lot of ringsiders thinking Harry had done enough to win another bout between the two was a draw even more impressive when you think Harry was only a middleweight .Harry incidently did not draw the colur bar beating the top middles and light heavies of his day eventualy giving Tiger Flowers a chance at the title,which Harry lost with good grace by then past his best.This is good book for the boxing fan interested in boxing in the twenties of one of the lesser known champions
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Format: Hardcover
The backbone of most good books is research. This book was really well researched.

The travelling, the regularity of fights, the segregation, and still Tiger Flowers was pleasant and positive about life.

A really fantastic story about a groundbreaking, all action fighter. And anybody who has read Bob Mee's stuff knows he is genuine and extremely knowledgable about boxing.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Really good read although I have read a lot on the slave trade in the Deep South it's hard to believe that African Americans were still being treated the same all those years later in most walks of life
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