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Thud!: (Discworld Novel 34) (Discworld series) by [Pratchett, Terry]
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Thud!: (Discworld Novel 34) (Discworld series) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 224 customer reviews

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Length: 453 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"Like reading Tolkien but with gags -- and good gags too."--"The Guardian"

The Times

'He may write benign comedy but he knows how horribly complicated and exciting the Universe is.'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2029 KB
  • Print Length: 453 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (1 Dec. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0031RS6NC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 224 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,687 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Hardcover
Terry Pratchett has done it again. With Thud! (I've lost track of how many Discworld books there have been), Pratchett returns to the adventures of the "coppers" of Ankh-Morpork, one of the largest cities on the Discworld. It's been a while since we've had a straight "City Watch" book, with Night Watch being a character study of Commander Samuel Vimes, and the subsequent books being standalones, I've really missed seeing the Watch in action. Thud! delivers on all cylinders, going back to some of the basics that made Pratchett what he is today. You've got your quirky characters, you've got your hilarious footnotes (something which seemed to have disappeared from Pratchett's books, much to my chagrin), and you've got Vimes leading them all, trying to be the best copper he can be, doing what's right despite what everybody else seems to want him to do.
The anniversary of the battle of Koom Valley, an ancient battle between the Dwarfs and the Trolls, is coming up, and tension in the city of Ankh-Morpork is rising. Commander Samuel Vimes can smell trouble, and he'll do anything to keep the city safe. When a rabble-rousing Dwarf from the Dwarf homeland is murdered, the Dwarfs immediately blame the Trolls, and it looks like blood will wash over the city. But not with Vimes and the rest of the Watch on the case. A sinister secret from the depths is working its way into the real world again, planning to use the animosity between the two races as its entry point, but it keeps getting stymied. Will the Watch solve the case and bring the perpetrators to justice? And just what is the secret of Koom Valley, and what does it have to do with this entity? And will Vimes be able to keep his daily six o'clock appointment with his young son to read Where's my Cow?
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By Lonya TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Sept. 2005
Format: Hardcover
On June 28, 1389 a combined army of Serbs, Bosnians, Albanians and Romanians waged a fierce battle against an Ottoman army on the Plains of Kosovo. Although details of the battle are obscure and lost in the mists of time the animosity between the parties has lingered. It was no surprise therefore that on the 600th anniversary of the battle President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia launched his `ethnic cleansing' campaign in Kosovo. Sometimes the oldest animosities burn the brightest.
That is just about the scenario found in "THUD", Terry Pratchett's latest roller coaster ride through Discworld. The origin and outcome of the ancient Battle of Koom Valley between the Trolls and Dwarves has been obscured and the subject of much debate; but, the lingering and long-lasting hatred between them means they are always one spark away from renewed battle.
Grag Hamcrusher is what you might call a Dwarf extremist. Emerging from the depths he rails against those dwarves who have risen close to the surface. He intimates Dwarf residents of Ankh-Morpork who have made accommodations to a life lived above ground. Hamcrusher is a zealot who would like nothing better than to renew a holy war against the hated Trolls. As Thud opens Hamcrusher has just been murdered, thud "being the sound the heavy club made as it connected with the head". The initial evidence, a troll club found near the apparent murder scene, seems destined to bring their historic enmity to a boil. It is up to Commander Vimes and the Watch to find out who killed Hamcrusher and try to avoid a war that could destroy Ankh-Morpork.
The Patrician, not surprisingly, has complicated matters for Vimes.
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Format: Hardcover
The discworld has resurfaced and it's as good as ever. This is very much a Sam Vimes book and like all of the Sam Vimes books, "Thud" is pretty dark (which I like). Pratchett explores deeper meanings in these book than most of the rest of the series and on this occasion he is exploring the mideast conflict. Two groups of ancient enemies are building up hostilities in the city of Ankh Moorpork over some ancient symbols. The dwarves and trolls do not need much antagonism to set them fighting each other. A Dwarf radical is killed and the trolls are blamed, and so the tension builds. Enter Sam Vimes to solve the case, except nothing is as it appears on the surface.
This is yet another classic for Pratchett fans. "Some things are important" is the catch phrase throughout this book, although I won't tell you why because it will ruin the story. Pratchett explores the concept of radical religion and how it affects even the non-religious. He never blames either side, but explores how both sides are right and wrong. The ending is superb as usual, but it is rather sad... to a point. I enjoyed this even more than Pratchett's recent Hat Full of Sky or the equally dark and highly recommended Dante's Last March by Mark Elliott.
The usual cast of characters are here and they are delightful as ever. Highly recommended
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've recently been carefully working my way chronologically through the discworld books, but I got a short loan of this one and couldn't pass it up, despite being nowhere near its turn. It is very different to the earliest books, perhaps lacking rather a lot of their laugh-after-laugh humour, but it wins out on one point. The whole book was justified for me by the staggeringly re-readable account of a man literally breaking the laws of the universe in order to read to his son at the appointed time. If the rest of the book were only a scene-setter for this, it would be worth it. Walking around for days after finishing it telling all and sundry that "It goes hrrugh, it is a hippopotamus" is surely a sign that a book is worth reading!
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