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Through the Looking Glass (Penguin Popular Classics) Paperback – 27 Sep 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; New Ed edition (27 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140620877
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140620870
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 0.6 x 18.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 482,870 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is deservedly a classic and very successful. Alice Through the Looking Glass is the sequel to the much-loved Alice in Wonderland.
This time, Alice finds herself on a giant chess board in a backwards universe. She encounters flowers that talk, Humpty Dumpty and his nonsense, a loud snorer, Tweedledum and Tweedledee arguing, an knight inventing nonsensical items and very strange species of insects.
It's in this world that Alice is on her quest to the end of the chess board to become a queen. The book is packed with Poems, such as the classic The Walrus and the Carpenter, and the Knight's poem that has several names. Alice hears of the White Queen's logic: 'Jam tomorrow, jam yesterday but never jam today' and the way that she travels backwards (she starts screaming and then later she pricks her finger with a pin).
Overall, an excellent piece of nonsense with humour and poetry aside. I'm sure even adults would enjoy dwelling on the concepts Alice Through the Looking Glass describes.
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Format: Paperback
Whilst this is still an enjoyable book, it doesn't have the magic of Alice in Wonderland and I couldn't help but feel slightly disappointed by it. It is still a grown up fairy story, but if you are looking for more of teh magic of Alice in Wonderland then I feel this will be disappointing to you.
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Format: Paperback
Some will debate whether "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" is the better of the two, or if "Through the Looking-Glass (and What Alice Found There)" is one of those instances where the sequel is better than the original. For myself, I think that Lewis Carroll (a.k.a Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) produced a work that so evenly matches its predecessor that readers have a difficult time remembering which characters and adventures take place in which story, and quite often people simply refer to the pair of them instead of the individual stories.

Published originally in 1871, six years after the first book, "Through the Looking-Glass" takes place six months later in terms of the time which has passed for Alice. As with the first book, there are themes which run throughout Alice's adventure. Mirror image is certainly a key theme, both in terms of things which appear the same as well as being the opposite. Alice travels through the looking-glass, much of these adventures take place on a chessboard, where the white and red pieces mirror each other. Tweedledum and Tweedledee are mirrors of each other. There are also mirrors between the second and first book, obviously with Alice herself, and then the use of games in each story, involving two colors and Kings and Queens.

The book opens with Alice talking to her cats and deciding to try to go through the looking-glass, which she does and then she finds the poem "Jabberwocky" which she has to read with the use of a mirror. From there Alice goes outside and as with the first story she is attracted by a garden in the distance, and as with the first book, there are obsticles on her way there. She then meets the Red Queen which results in her joining the game of chess as a White Pawn.
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Format: Paperback
One cold afternoon, Alice starts day dreaming about what the world might look like through the looking glass. Suddenly, the mirror begins to shimmer, and Alice finds herself in Looking-Glass House. At first, she is quite amused to find that the chess board is alive. But as she tries to wander out to the garden, she finds the pieces have grown to be life like. Soon, she finds herself a willing pawn in their game, attempting to make it to the eighth row and become queen herself. Along the way, she meets Tweedledum and Tweedledee, not to mention Humpty Dumpty and the Lion and the Unicorn. Will she make it to become queen?

While I enjoy Alice in Wonderland, I get a much bigger kick out of this book. Frankly, the way that things work in the mirror world are very creative. Alice running toward something and winding up farther away, for example. And there's my favorite, the White Queen screaming in pain before she is pricked by a pin.

Frankly, I'd forgotten just how much of this book was stolen by Disney for their movie. This is where you'll find the idea of an unbirthday, for example.

I think this book also makes better use of the dream state. Some of what happens to Alice seems more like something that has happened in my dreams, so I could really identify.

Overall, there is a coherent plot this time instead of just Alice moving from one strange thing to another. True, there's still that, but there is a purpose behind her wandering.

Overall, this is a fun but very strange romp through a dream state. It's wacky enough to entertain kids of all ages.
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By Steven R. McEvoy TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 4 Dec. 2008
Format: Paperback
Though this book is not much better than Alice's Adventures, the chess motif and theme does make the book much more interesting. With the bossy, dominant Red Queen and the quiet, kind, messy white queen, the book is a study in contrasts.

The interweaving of the Nursery Rhyme Characters and the frequent fish poetry references does provide more continuity and a sense of sequential events than Alice's first adventure. I also appreciated the linking of the cat at the beginning and end of the story.

It does still feel like Carroll did way too many opium pipes in his time.

(First written as Journal Reading Notes in 1999.)
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