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The Empty Throne (The Last Kingdom Series, Book 8) (The Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories) by [Cornwell, Bernard]
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The Empty Throne (The Last Kingdom Series, Book 8) (The Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories) Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 1,250 customer reviews

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Length: 353 pages Word Wise: Enabled Audible Narration:
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Review

Praise for Bernard Cornwell:

‘The best battle scenes of any writer I’ve ever read, past or present. Cornwell really makes history come alive’ George R.R. Martin

‘Cornwell is always in full command of his material’ SUNDAY TIMES

‘Like GAME OF THRONES, but real’ Observer

‘Tense, powerful, compulsive’ THE TIMES

‘He’s called a master storyteller. Really he’s cleverer than that’ TELEGRAPH

‘Nobody in the world does this better than Cornwell’ Lee Child

From the Back Cover

The eighth installment of Bernard Cornwell s bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, like Game of Thrones, but real (The Observer, London) the basis forThe Last Kingdom, the hit BBC America television series.

My name is Uhtred. I am the son of Uhtred, who was the son of Uhtred . . .

Britain, early tenth century AD: a time of change. There are new raids by the Vikings from Ireland, and turmoil among the Saxons over the leadership of Mercia. A younger generation is taking over.

When AEthelred, the ruler of Mercia, dies, he leaves no legitimate heir. The West Saxons want their king, but Uhtred has long supported AEthelflaed, sister to King Edward of Wessex and widow of AEethelred. Widely loved and respected, AEthelflaed has all the makings of a leader but can Saxon warriors ever accept a woman as their ruler? The stage is set for rivals to fight for the empty throne.

With this eighth entry in the epic Saxon Tales series, we are reminded once again whyNew York Timesbestselling author Bernard Cornwell is the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today (Wall Street Journal)."


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1152 KB
  • Print Length: 353 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (23 Oct. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JKOJZBM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 1,250 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #984 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Uhtred is getting older, but not not sweeter, kinder, or more tolerant. As for his numerous enemies, they now have to reckon with his diabolical cunning and deception as well as his feared strategic insight and personal valour. Having nearly been killed while winning the battle of Tettenhall the previous year (that would be 911) he is still crippled, pain-ridden, and sometimes ready to welcome death as a blessed release. Yet somehow he manages to keep one step ahead of plotting ealdormen, faithless royalty, and ruthless scheming Norsemen.

You may be puzzled as you start the first page - I was - until you realize that the narrator is Uhtred's son Uhtred, rather than Uhtred himself. Soon enough, though, Uhtred the elder picks up the tale from his own point of view. This is a technical exploit that an inferior author might easily bodge, yet Mr Cornwell carries it off with aplomb - and gets the desired effect by showing Uhtred the elder's plight through the eyes of someone who loves and respects him.

The pace is fast and furious from beginning to end, with all the familiar ingredients skilfully woven in: statecraft, skullduggery, strategy, swordsmanship. We meet a new and extremely dangerous young Norse leader who is as attractive as he is arrogant and who consequently makes some truly surprising friends and alliances. And this leads to a promising set-up for the next book or two, whose vague outlines I imagine I can discern with the aid of history books and familiarity with Mr Cornwell's methods. One of the risks of a long, episode-packed series such as this is that the author himself may become bored or jaded. Rest assured, there is not the slightest sign of that happening to the saga of Uhtred! I look forward to the next book with the keenest anticipation.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For once, I'm lost for words - this book is Cornwell at the top of his trade. Book delivered Thursday, finished Friday evening. What an absolute corker!! I thought the previous books were fantastic, but this one surpasses them all. Uhtred is showing signs of VERY slight mellowing in his middle years - even has a sense of humour, which I doubt was much in evidence in the struggles of the time.
Will try to contain my impatience until Book 9 is out. Completely and thoroughly recommended - ten stars!!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is instalment eight of the Warrior Chronicles set in the time of King Alfred and his son and successor, Edward the Elder (reigned 899-924), with Uthred, the pagan warlord brought up by the Danes, still fighting on the side of the Saxons, and at the side of Alfred’s daughter, Aethelflaed ,“the Lady of the Mercians”, in particular.

This book picks up the story where the previous volume ended, although it is possible to read it in isolation. To be fair, however, it is preferable – but not absolutely necessary - to read the whole series sequentially. Just like the previous volume (and just about all the others as well!), this one is a thundering good yarn, and a hugely entertaining read. For me at least (and for many others, I suspect), it is the kind of book you would do well NOT to start reading in the evening when you have to get up next morning to go to work.

Again, Bernard Cornwell has been true to form and has delivered yet another first class swashbuckler adventure story. It has a fast-paced narrative with lots of “blood and thunder”, plots, battles and treason. It is also based on a well-researched historical context and a number of historical characters that the author has somewhat adapted (or even distorted at times) to allow Uthred the warlord to continue to play the leading role that he has had throughout the series.

The characterisation is perhaps the strongest point of the book, if only because this is where it could have gone badly wrong, with descriptions of Uthred, Finan and their usual antics becoming tiresome, improbable and “déjà vu”.
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Format: Hardcover
I am a huge Bernard Cornwell fan and buy and love all his books. In a way this was no exception an excellent read as always grips you from start to finish. My only concern is that this is now the 8th book in the series and the stories have become a little mundane with Uhtred doing basically the same things in each book with minor variations in the story line. I think the story should have been finished off in the 4th or 5th book and BC gone on to another historical character/period.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read book 1 - 8 of the Last Kingdom series back to back as if they were one omnibus through a wet and miserable January. I had seen the BBC 2 series which covered book 1 and book 2 and found The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman such good reads I was glad that I had not read them before seeing the series. I was impressed by the explanations of the internal struggle Uhtred has to establish his identity,, and the uniqueness into which he forges his experiences , philosophy and education into the warrior and man he grows into. I was also impressed by the historical integrity Conwell brought to the background of Uhtred's adventures. Definite page turners all the way through. Loved every minute spent reading 1-8.
Although one should not bring 21st century thinking, morals and mores to 10th century life, one could not help thinking that 'everything changes and nothing changes.' Cornwell does encourage the reader to stop and think beyond the swashbuckling thoughout.
I am not sure whether Uhtred's forewords are a good or bad thing - whether they telegraph the ultimate outcome of the scrapes and adventures or whether they enhance the enjoyment of the finer points of the tale...
I was disappointed at the Kindle price of book 9- Warriors of the Storm, which at the present time is more than the hardback edition. Although I am hooked enough to want to read it very badly, principle prevents me following on at this time.
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