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Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Length: 357 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

RICHARD LAYARD is one of the world's leading labour economists, and in 2008 received the International Prize for Labour Economics. A member of the House of Lords, he has done much to raise the public profile of mental health. His 2005 book Happiness has been translated into 20 languages.

DAVID M. CLARK, Professor of Psychology at Oxford, is one of the world's leading experts on CBT, responsible for much progress in treatment methods. With Richard Layard, he was the main driver behind the UK's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 4100 KB
  • Print Length: 357 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 July 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00JX5RCWW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #228,428 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Mental illness reduces national income by about 4%, and yet we only spend about 13% of our health budget and about 5% of our medical research funds on tackling the problem.

As an economist who writes a fair bit on mental health, I regularly trot out statements like this about how costly mental health problems are to society and how the under-provision of services is grossly inefficient. To some the point may now seem obvious and trite. As evidence grows ever more compelling, government policy slowly shifts in response. One success story is the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative, which has greatly improved the availability of evidence-based treatment for some of the most prevalent mental health problems in the UK. Yet in many cases we still await adequate action from the government and decision-makers. Two key players in getting IAPT into government policy were Richard Layard – an economist – and David Clark – a psychologist. In their new book Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies, Layard and Clark demonstrate the need for wider provision of cost-effective mental health care in the UK.

The book starts with a gentle introduction to mental illness; what it is, who suffers, the nature of treatment. This will give any reader a way in, with an engaging set-up for what follows (though with one third of families including someone with a mental illness, most people will find the topic relatable). The opening chapters go on to dig deeper into these questions; do these people get help, how does it affect their lives and what are the societal impacts?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is flawed in many ways and seems largely to be a sales pitch for the IAPT service which is also flawed.
1) no epidemic in history was ever dealt with on a one to one treatment basis. If Layard and Clarke are going to see psychological distress as illness then they might at least recognise that in order to deal with an epidemic then either environmental or mass behavioural change needs to be made. Tackling it ion a case by case basis is going to fail. They do briefly touch upon intervention but it is not thought out or a comprehensive approach. By way of observation, what we are seeing is not an disease but a response to an environment that makes sense, whether it is a physiological response (anxiety) or an avoidant response (depression[misery]), it makes sense to the individual in their terms and their circumstances.
2) The data on twin studies has been so roundly disputed to the extent that in October 13 the American Psychiatric Association at the time of the publication of DSM 5 admitted, in the form of DSM-5 Task Force head David Kupfer stating, “In the future, we hope to be able to identify disorders using biological and genetic markers that provide precise diagnoses that can be delivered with complete reliability and validity. Yet this promise, which we have anticipated since the 1970s, remains disappointingly distant. We’ve been telling patients for several decades that we are waiting for biomarkers. We’re still waiting.”
Furthermore, in an October, 2013 study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Trzaskowski, Dale, and Plomin compared GCTA results with twin method results in a study of “childhood behavior problems” which included autistic, depressive, hyperactive, anxiety, and conduct symptoms.
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Format: Hardcover
This book provides a readable, timely reminder of the ongoing need for society to recognise the unmet needs of people with mental illness. The authors should be commended in their efforts to bring together a wealth of important data about the mental health needs of the population, the evidence-based therapies that exist, but unfortunately also the woeful lack of access many people still have to these treatments. In times of austerity, it is also good to know that these treatments are not costly to the public purse, and the authors explain how society will more than make its money back in offering these treatments out far more widely. It is hard to read this book without concluding that there is an urgent, ethical imperative for policy-makers to act. A modern day call to arms for all who are interested in the mental wellbeing of our nation.
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Format: Hardcover
As a health care professional I found this book extremely interesting and know it will help in understanding the variation in treatment outcomes I sometimes encounter. On a personal note it gave me a much better understanding of an ongoing situation with a close family member. For that I am most grateful to the authors for publishing this book and would recommend it to anyone finding themselves in a similar situation.
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Format: Hardcover
Thrive is an excellent, well-balanced, inspiring, eye-opening read. The authors demonstrate the gross injustice in our healthcare system that we’ve become accustomed to and what to do about it. Treatments are readily promoted and made available for physical health conditions like diabetes, but not for depression and anxiety disorders, which cause more misery in the world than physical health problems. Ninety per cent of people with physical illness get the help they need. Less than one third of people with mental illness are in treatment. Yet there are treatments that work, are short-term, and cost-effective. I loved the What Works for Whom chapter, which described the best treatments for different psychological problems. Six different therapies are recommended and shown to work for mild to moderate depression, including short-term psychodynamic therapy. This book is hardly skewed, far from it. The authors show what works for whom and the next best steps to ensure people who need psychological treatment will get the help they need. A different life is possible for people with mental health problems and would cost the UK nothing if the proven treatments were provided more widely. It is a genius argument, a win-win solution: make the treatments more widely available and they pay for themselves.
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