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Three Junes Paperback – 1 Apr 2003

4.0 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor Books; Reprint edition (1 April 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385721420
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385721424
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.5 x 20.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,359,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Enormously accomplished....rich, absorbing, and full of life." -"The New Yorker
""A warm, wise debut. . . . Three Junes marks a blessed event for readers of literary fiction everywhere."-San Francisco Chronicle
"Julia Glass's talent sends chills up my spine; Three Junes is a marvel."-Richard Russo, author of Empire Falls"
"
"Three Junes almost threatens to burst with all the life it contains. Glass's ability to illuminate and deepen the mysteries of her characters' lives is extraordinary." - Michael Cunningham, author of The Hours"
"
"'Three Junes' brilliantly rescues, then refurbishes, the traditional plot-driven novel. . . Glass has written a generous book about family expectations-but also about happiness." -" The New York Times Book Review
""Gorgeous. . .'Three Junes' goes after the big issues without a trace of fustiness and gives us a memorable hero." - "Los Angeles Times Book Review"
"'Three Junes' is a novel that bursts with the lives of its characters. They move into our hearts, taking up permanent residence, the newest members of the reader's family of choice."-"Times-Picayune"
"Fiercely realized. . .luxuriant in its emotional comprehension and the idea, or promise, that anything might happen."-"Boston Globe
"
"Radiant...an intimate literary triptych of lives pulled together and torn apart."-"Chicago Tribune
""Sophisticated . . . Engrossing . . . Catches the surprising twists and turns in family relationships, amid love, loss, hope and regret."-"Seattle Post-Intelligencer"
"The sort of sparkling debut that marks a writer as one to watch." -"Daily News
""The fluid, evolving nature of family history is at the heart of this assured first novel."-"Time Out New York
""This first novel treats family ties, erotic longing, small children and prolonged deaths from AIDS and cancer with a subtlety that grows from scrupulous unsentimentality."-"Newsday"
"Formidable. . . The traditional novel of social relations is very much alive in Three Junes. Virginia Woolf and Elizabeth Bowen, among other exemplars, would surely approve."-"Kirkus Reviews"
"Brimming with a marvelous cast of intricate characters set in an assortment of scintillating backdrops, Glass's philosophically introspective novel is highly intelligent and well-written."-"Booklist
"

Enormously accomplished .rich, absorbing, and full of life. -"The New Yorker
" A warm, wise debut. . . . Three Junes marks a blessed event for readers of literary fiction everywhere. San Francisco Chronicle
Julia Glass s talent sends chills up my spine; Three Junes is a marvel. Richard Russo, author of Empire Falls"
"
Three Junes almost threatens to burst with all the life it contains. Glass s ability to illuminate and deepen the mysteries of her characters lives is extraordinary. Michael Cunningham, author of The Hours"
"
Three Junes brilliantly rescues, then refurbishes, the traditional plot-driven novel. . . Glass has written a generous book about family expectations but also about happiness. " The New York Times Book Review
" Gorgeous. . . Three Junes goes after the big issues without a trace of fustiness and gives us a memorable hero. "Los Angeles Times Book Review"
Three Junes is a novel that bursts with the lives of its characters. They move into our hearts, taking up permanent residence, the newest members of the reader s family of choice. "Times-Picayune"
Fiercely realized. . .luxuriant in its emotional comprehension and the idea, or promise, that anything might happen. "Boston Globe
"
Radiant an intimate literary triptych of lives pulled together and torn apart. "Chicago Tribune
" Sophisticated . . . Engrossing . . . Catches the surprising twists and turns in family relationships, amid love, loss, hope and regret. "Seattle Post-Intelligencer"
The sort of sparkling debut that marks a writer as one to watch. "Daily News
" The fluid, evolving nature of family history is at the heart of this assured first novel. "Time Out New York
" This first novel treats family ties, erotic longing, small children and prolonged deaths from AIDS and cancer with a subtlety that grows from scrupulous unsentimentality. "Newsday"
Formidable. . . The traditional novel of social relations is very much alive in Three Junes. Virginia Woolf and Elizabeth Bowen, among other exemplars, would surely approve. "Kirkus Reviews"
Brimming with a marvelous cast of intricate characters set in an assortment of scintillating backdrops, Glass's philosophically introspective novel is highly intelligent and well-written. "Booklist
""

Book Description

'Threatens to burst with all the life it contains.' Michael Cunningham, author of The Hours --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Three Junes is a novel written in three sections, covering the three summers in the life of a Scottish family, where significant events are displayed over a ten year period.
In the First part entitled COLLIES, we are transported to Greece where the elder Paul McLeod a newpaper publisher is mentally recuperating after his wife's death and where, in his lonliness he meets Fern an American artist whom he is somewhat attracted to.
In the second section entitled UPRIGHT, which is my favourite section, we are given an in-depth look at he McLeod family and this is narrated by Fenno one of the sons who is gay and runs a bookstore in Manhattan. The other sons Dennis who David who are happily married, one living in the family home of Tealing where he does his veterinary work and the other lives in France with his wife Veronique.
Glass showcases the lives of this family as they come for their father's family in Tealing Scotland. This section was very arresting to my mind which I consider the nucleus and focal point of the entire book. Joy and tears reign looking back at the old times and reminiscing about the past lives of their lost parents, friends they used to know. There is a lot of compassion here too causing you to start rallying around this family who sometimes does not know if they are going or coming, but they are lovable nevertheless. Featured in the book too are quite a lot of Fenno friends all artist in their own right.......photographers, music reviewers, writers, book lovers and the beat goes on.
In the third section entitled BOYS, this is the shortest section yet and this is when Fenno meets Fern, his father's former lover in long island.
This is a wonderful contemporary novel to be savoured and not rushed through.
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Format: Paperback
I have just reread this book, after a gap of about 5 yrs, and have to say I have enjoyed doing so immensely.

The story is divided into 3 sections, each set in a week in June. The 1st and 3rd parts are short and told in the 3rd person, while the middle section is the main focus, recounted in the 1st person by Fenno, a 30-something gay man living in New York. For me, it is this part that stands out.

The book is well-written. Indeed, in the first two parts, I was so caught up in the storyline, that I forgot I was merely a reader, and it was only when I came across the odd technical error (the Wimbledon Women's Final in 1995 was not held in June, for example) that I was momentarily jolted back to my reality. Additionally, Glass has the knack of conjuring up whole worlds with just one sentence. Fenno's life as a gay adolescent in a (presumably) all male boarding school is summed up ... "Not long after, I shipped off to school, and so many other concerns and preoccupations fell upon me - from all sides like collapsing walls - that when I next returned home, the dogs seemed like distant old friends ...". No specifics, but so much feeling relayed. Excellent.

The book skips continually between the present and the past, but is never hard to follow, and it all has a flow that moves you from setting to setting with ease. Much is revealed, but effortlessly. The first part, following Fenno's father on a week's holiday in Greece shortly after being widowed, sets up the context for Fenno's narrative. The book's weakness, however, is in the 3rd part. It's main focus is Fern, who 10 yrs earlier had met Paul on his trip to Greece. For me, her character had not played a large enough part in the previous sections to justify such prominence here.
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Format: Paperback
I originally bought this novel thinking it would be a great one to get lost in when I was away on holiday. I found, however, that I kept picking it up and setting it back down again despite myself. The novel is divided into three separate parts which roughly all follow the trials and tribulations of the McLeod family. I found myself most drawn in by the first (and to a lesser extent the second parts of the novel). In the first part we follow the character of Paul McLeod as he journeys to Greece to try and deal with the death of his wife. I would have liked the author to explore their relationship a little more as I felt there were areas that could have been mined much further and which would have made interesting reading. It is to the author's credit that although we tend to mostly see Paul's wife through his and his son's eyes we get a very strong sense of her determined character.

The second part of the novel is told by Paul's gay son Fenno. I enjoyed reading about his developing relationship with his acid-tongued friend in Manhattan and I thought Julia Glass managed to evoke the era of AIDS devastating the gay scene really well. However Fenno's maudlin character did get on my nerves eventually. I felt that I wanted to avoid him after a while - not possible unfortunately when he is one of the main characters.

To be honest when I reached the third part of the novel I initially missed the link of how that character was connected to the rest of the story - a sign for me at least that this novel was simply too long. This was my main gripe with the book. I thought structuring the novel in this way was an excellent device but felt slightly cheated by the third part which brought nothing new to the previous two parts.
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