Buy Used
£2.12
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Thousand Names: The Shadow Campaign (Shadow Campaign 1) Hardcover – 4 Jul 2013

4.4 out of 5 stars 31 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£11.25 £2.12

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Del Rey (4 July 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091949890
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091949891
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 4.4 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 721,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

"The Coolest Fantasy Story You'll Read This Week" (i09)

"an excellent book" (SFX)

"A spectacular epic" (Fantasy Book Critic)

"Exceptional military fantasy" (Jason M. Hough National Bestselling author of The Darwin Elevator)

"Wexler’s polished military fantasy, first in the Shadow Campaign series, distinguishes itself from other epic doorstops with its unique setting, intricate plotting, and layered characters…This excellent series debut is for fans of Peter Brett, Daniel Abraham, and Joe Abercrombie." (Booklist)

Book Description

A bold new direction for epic fantasy with muskets, demons and magic.

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Brilliantly written
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I've had The Thousand Names sitting on my TBR bookcase for a while now and the sheer number of pages made me wonder if I was ever going to get around to reading it, but a few days ago I plunged right in and here we are...

There may well be a nifty term for these kind of books, not quite 'sword and sorcery' but more 'muskets and sorcery' but I can't immediately recall what it is - there's a comment in there somewhere about Napoleon's military expedition to Egypt being a major influence on the story line and I can see that quite easily. Essentially most of the main characters are soldiers, some of whom have been stationed in a desert country in support of a weak monarch but who now find themselves fighting a war on multiple sides against the people who want to overthrow him and also a group of religious fanatics.

I'm not a great fan of battle scenes so there were a few places where I skimmed my way through a dozen pages or so to get to the next part of the actual plot, with apologies to the author who probably worked hard on those. We discover quite early on that one of our main characters is actually a woman disguised as a man, only for another to turn up later on - one seems statistically possible (as we know it happened historically) but two within a smallish group of soldiers somewhat strains credibility. I guess if you're wanting to write historical fantasy but also want female characters who do something, it's a little too tempting to go down that road.

Anyway, overall plot-line: under the command of a new colonel, the soldiers find themselves pursuing artefacts of power deep into the desert.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Opinion for this one is a bit split, but I'm leaning towards the better side of average overall.

The beginning of the book I found a bit of a slog to read; info-dumps, awkward names and the lack of any movement didn't convince me early on that this was something I'd want to continue reading.

Once the plot gets moving though, the main strength of the book comes to the fore: its characters. The two POV focus-points, Marcus and Winter, are given backgrounds, real personality and are the kinds that make understandable decisions as the plot progresses: they're likeable, and really helped turn large parts of the book into compelling reading for me that otherwise wouldn't have been.

The plot itself isn't particularly interesting, the Arabia-esque desert style setting works fine, but most of the book simply follows an army from engagement-to-engagement. Action set-pieces a-plenty are fine, though verging on getting a little tired toward the latter half, but do serve effectively to broaden out the POV characters and the interesting set of secondary characters, particularly the mercurial Colonel Vhalnich.

The final stages of the book introduce a magic system. Subtly hinted at earlier in various chapters, its final revelation isn't exactly spectacular – the religious overtones not helping one bit – but was effective enough, despite a tame "boss-battle", that I'd be interested in finding out the next part in the stories of Winter, Janus and the captain.

I'm not exactly running to The Shadow Throne (the follow-up novel), but I'll get to it at some point.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A new subgenre of fantasy for me, I have to say I enjoyed my first foray into ‘flintlock fantasy’ an enormous amount. Having never read anything of the subgenre, all I had to go on were the amazing reviews of this, and those of Brian McClellan’s Powder Mage Trilogy. I had no idea what to expect, and I am glad that the gamble paid off. The book was fast-paced, and I seemed to blow through it very quickly.
I’ve come to find –recently in particular- that I am a great fan of military fantasy, which I think The Thousand Names should certainly be classed as. The fact as well that it challenges the traditional ‘sword and shield’ fantasy trope, made the read a voyage of discovery for me.
I engaged with the plot quickly, enjoying the fact that ‘magic’ was considered mysterious by the protagonists and was therefore side-lined to a certain extent. While the twists were a little predictable in places (at the risk of spoilers, one of the characters not being what (s)he seemed), the ingenuity displayed by the protagonists in various of the tight spots they found themselves in was incredibly entertaining.
Overall I found the book very entertaining, in large part for its focus on the military and campaigning aspects. The way the sequel was set up in the last chapter makes me wonder whether or not I will enjoy it to the same extent. On the strength of The Thousand Names however, I am certainly willing to give it more than a chance.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A debut author from Del Rey that not only brings a brand new world to the fore but really picks up on the whole Flintlock Fantasy that fan's have been crying out for. The world is imaginative and with a tale that feels like it's the beginning of an epic series (with the careful world-building alongside giving the reader chance to know the world through two of the main characters initially) all round is set to give you something special.

As with Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen, the scope is huge, the cast massive (with something for everyone) and when added to pace alongside prose that will more than keep you glued all round makes this something pretty unique. Throw into the mix that this debut is massively impressive alongside the twists and turns within really is giving people the chance to get in on the ground level so early on. With luck, Django will continue to work on the success of this, learn lessons from some of the problems within and won't be struck down with the infamous book two curse.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category