• RRP: £13.20
  • You Save: £0.20 (2%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Usually dispatched within 1 to 2 months.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Book has some visible wear on the binding, cover, pages. Biggest little used bookstore in the world.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Those Who Forget the Past: The Question of Anti-Semitism Paperback – 31 May 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£13.00
£8.22 £1.93
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£13.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Usually dispatched within 1 to 2 months. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 649 pages
  • Publisher: Random House USA Inc; New title edition (31 May 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812972031
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812972030
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 3.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,059,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

From the Inside Flap

Something has changed.
After the horrors of World War II, people everywhere believed that it could never happen again, but today the evidence is unmistakable that anti-Semitism is dramatically on the rise once more. The torching of European synagogues, suicide terror in Israel, the relentless comparison of the Israelis to Nazis, the paranoid post-September 11 Internet-bred conspiracy theories, the Holocaust-denial literature spreading throughout the Arab world, the calumny and violence erupting on American college campuses: Suddenly, a new anti-Semitism has become widespread, even acceptable to some.
In this chilling and important new book, Ron Rosenbaum, author of the highly praised Explaining Hitler, brings together a collection of powerful essays about the origin and nature of the new anti-Semitism. Paul Berman, Marie Brenner, David Brooks, Harold Evans, Todd Gitlin, Jeffrey Goldberg, Bernard Lewis, David Mamet, Amos Oz, Cynthia Ozick, Frank Rich, Jonathan Rosen, Edward Said, Judith Shulevitz, Lawrence Summers, Jeffrey Toobin, and Robert Wistrich are among the distinguished writers and intellectuals who grapple with painful questions: Why now? What is--or isn't--new? Is a second Holocaust possible, this time in the Middle East? How does anti-Semitism differ from anti-Zionism?
These are issues too dangerous to ignore, too pressing to deny. Those Who Forget the Past is an essential volume for understanding the new bigotry of the twenty-first century.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 22 Jun. 2006
Format: Paperback
It never went away. It was hiding in the West, but in the Arab World it has been very prevalent and open throughout the last few decades. The evidence of its resurgence includes the terror onslaught on Israeli civilians, the desecration of Jewish cemeteries in Europe, the twisted habit of some media to equate Israel with Hitler's Germany and Zionism with Nazism, the lunatic conspiracy theories in best-selling books and on the internet, the torching of synagogues in Europe, the rise in attacks on European Jews, the filthy propaganda in the Arab media and the recent pronouncements of the president of Iran.

This valuable collection of essays explores the history and current state of the oldest hatred from different perspectives. A wide range of opinions from across the political spectrum is represented here, including those of Melanie Phillips, Gabriel Schoenfeld, Martin Peretz, Bernard Lewis, Paul Berman, Nat Hentoff, Todd Gitlin, Amos Oz, David Brooks and Robert Wistrich. Those essays that impress the least or come across as insincere or unconvincing are by Judith Butler, Edward Said and Tariq Ramadan.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Something has Changed

Published in 2004 in the 4th year of the Palestinian terror war against the Israeli population, known by the terrorists as the Al Aqsa Intifada.

This digest edited and put together by Ron Rosenbaum, author of the momentous Explaining Hitler (text only) by R. Rosenbaum, brings together essays by key thinkers and writers on the topic of the New Antisemitism and anti-Israel hate.

Some very palpable observations by the writers here make this essential reading for those concerned about the newest form of the oldest hatred.
In his article in The New Yorker article entitled 'Behind Mubarak' , Jeffrey Goldberg cites an example of Islamic admiration for and determination to emulate Adolf Hitler. A columnist in a 'moderate' Cairo newspaper wrote 'Thanks to Hitler of blessed memory, who on behalf of the Palestinians took revenge in advance on the most vile criminals on the face of the earth...WE do have a complaint against him [Hitler] for his revenge was not enough'.

In his essay 'Something has Changed' Paul Berman refers to the Judeophobic Portuguese novelist Jose Scaemango who claimed when he victed Ramallah in 2002 to observe the Israeli siege of arch terrorist Yasser Arafat's terror compound in Ramallah, referred to this siege as 'a crime comparable to Auschwitz'. The only thing comparable to Auschwitz was the bloody campaign of terrorist atrocities - mainly homicide bombings killinmg hundreds of Israeli men, women and children (they made no boned about the fact of especially targeting children) that led to Israel besieging Arafat in the beginning.

Scaramngo does not end his absurdity there, but traces Israel's policies to Biblical Judaism.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 9 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lest We Forget... 11 Nov. 2014
By Frimousse - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Exceptionallly well-written and a powerful collection of essays and pieces about the nature of anti-Semitism
and its consequences in the Middle East, Europe, the United States and the rest of the world in the 20th and 21st centuries.
A must-read lest we forget the tragedies borne out of bigotry, ignorance and hate.
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superbly balanced timely collection of voices 24 Nov. 2006
By John Harpur - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With so many studies of anti-Semitism available, the choice of an overview of the central issues is daunting. This book, in my opinion, is a better place to start than historical exegeses that methodically unpick the past hisotry of slurs. Its focus on contemporary commentary by contempoary commentators is its greatest strength. Many non-Jews accept that anti-Semitism existed historically but have great difficulty recognising its current expressions. Conventional liberal wisdom holds that anti-Semitism has gone away; it is a spent force not worth bothering with, except by a few insignificant lumpen elements with no media credibility. Did I slip in the last phrase deliberately? I sure did. It is the media credibility of the new expressions of anti-Semitism that are most alarming. These geenrally take the form of castigations of Israeli military actions extending to Israeli govenment policies, and shading into 'critiques' of Israel as a country, a society, and a nation. Every democracy has to accept scrutiny of its political and security actions. But when criticism moves beyond the political and is genercially directed at a whole society, where no acknowlegement is made of ongoing debates between citizens and government policies, then there is just cause to complain that dark prejudices are at work. This book does a marvellous job of bringing many of these hidden influences to the surface for analysis. Perhaps the most telling line in the text is the concern expressed by the majority of commentators that critics of Israel obsess about its shortcomings while selectively ignoring the brutal human rights abuses taking place in all the countries surrounding it. If you were of the opinion that criticism of Israel and anti-Semitism are decouplable politically, this book may ask you the re-examine that assumption.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Something has Changed 4 May 2013
By Gary Selikow - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Published in 2004 in the 4th year of the Palestinian terror war against the Israeli population, known by the terrorists as the Al Aqsa Intifada.

This digest edited and put together by Ron Rosenbaum, author of the momentous Explaining Hitler (text only) by R. Rosenbaum, brings together essays by key thinkers and writers on the topic of the New Antisemitism and anti-Israel hate.

Some very palpable observations by the writers here make this essential reading for those concerned about the newest form of the oldest hatred.
In his article in The New Yorker article entitled 'Behind Mubarak' , Jeffrey Goldberg cites an example of Islamic admiration for and determination to emulate Adolf Hitler. A columnist in a 'moderate' Cairo newspaper wrote 'Thanks to Hitler of blessed memory, who on behalf of the Palestinians took revenge in advance on the most vile criminals on the face of the earth...WE do have a complaint against him [Hitler] for his revenge was not enough'.

In his essay 'Something has Changed' Paul Berman refers to the Judeophobic Portuguese novelist Jose Scaemango who claimed when he victed Ramallah in 2002 to observe the Israeli siege of arch terrorist Yasser Arafat's terror compound in Ramallah, referred to this siege as 'a crime comparable to Auschwitz'. The only thing comparable to Auschwitz was the bloody campaign of terrorist atrocities - mainly homicide bombings killinmg hundreds of Israeli men, women and children (they made no boned about the fact of especially targeting children) that led to Israel besieging Arafat in the beginning.

Scaramngo does not end his absurdity there, but traces Israel's policies to Biblical Judaism. According to Scaramango the story of David and Goliath was that of a blond person (David) employing superior technology to kill at a distance a helpless and supposedly non blond person , the unfortunate and oppressed Goliath. Berman go's some way towards analyzing the demonization of Israel and glorification of terrorist murder.

Harold Evans succinctly and accurately in his talk 'The View from Ground Zero' , what is and what is not Antisemitism dealing effectively with the idiotic cliche that defenders of Israel silence the critics of that nation with accusations of Antisemitism. Evens points out that while it is not necessarily Antisemitic to question specific Israeli government actions or policies 'It is Antisemitic to vilify the State of Israel as a diabolical abstraction, reserving tolerance for individual Jews but not the collective Jew ; It is Anti-Semitic to invent malignant outrages ; It is Anti-Semitic to constantly condemn in Israel what you ignore or condone elsewhere; It is above all Anti-Semitism to dehumanize Judaism and the Jewish people so as to incite and justify their extermination. That is what has been done thousands and thousands of times over on a preposterous basis.
Evans deals with some of the vile Anti-Semitic propaganda in the Islamic world and of the left in the media and universities. Included in these are numerous reports in the Arab and Iranian media that Jews use the blood of gentiles to make matzoh for Passover or pastries for Purim. Or the Pro-Palestinian students as San Francisco State University who put up a poster of can labelled 'Palestinian children's meat slaughtered according to Jewish rights under American license'.

Evans explores the adoption by Hamas and Hezbollah and across the Islamic world of the Tsarist forgery 'The Protocols of the Elders of Zion'
He also describes the brutal exhibition at al Nayhar University in Nablus entitled 'The Sbarro Cafe Exhibition' celebrating the bombing by Hamas of of a family Pizza restaurant in Tel Aviv,where mostly Jewish children were killed.

In his essay on The Old-New Anti-Semitism Robert Wistrich describes how Israel embodies the collective Jew. Wistrich rightly points out that 'Despite the incessant hair-splitting over the need to separate anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism, this has in recent decades become a distinction without meaningful difference. Whatever theoretical contortions one may indulge in- The State of Israel is a Jewish State. Whoever wants to defame or destroy it, openly or through policies that contain nothing else but such destruction is in effect practicing the Jew-hatred of yesteryear, whatever their self-proclaimed intentions'.

I might add that Israel being the largest Jewish community in the world and the fact that Israelis are Jews makes the 'We are anti-Zionist but not ant-Semitic' lie perfidious.

Gabriel Schoenfeld goes further in getting to the heart of hatred of Jews and Israel. He quotes a Saudi cleric, translated by the Middle East Media Research Institute who , in a government sponsored sermon, exhorted his followers 'Not to have mercy or compassion of the Jews. their blood, their money, their flesh. Their women are yours legitimately. God made them yours. Why dont you enslave their women? Why dont you wage Jihad? Why don't you pillage them?'
More recently a female Palestinian lawyer, with strong connections to the Western left has exhorted Palestinians to use rape as a weapon against Israeli women.

Other essays dissect the perverted and bizarre Holocaust inversion, the staple diet of the Islamists and anti-Zionist left whereby the Jews , descendants of Holocaust survivors, are now branded Nazis and the Palestinians (who aim to slaughter every last Jewish man, women and child in Israel) are awarded the status of the Jews of the Holocaust.

Laurie Zoloft describes the violent attack at San Francisco State University by a mob of Pro-Palestinian students on a group of Jewish students who had gathered for a peace rally. The university administration refused to intervene. Zoloft correctly points out that had it been Palestinian or Black students under attack, the university administration would certifiably have gone to stand by their side.
The venomous culture of Jew and Israel-hatred on American universities is analysed by various other writers also.

In her piece Fiamma Nirenstein points out how worldwide the killing of Jews whom live in Judea and Samaria, and who lived in Gaza, 'the settlers' is presented in the media as justified, as if 'they asked for it' , even small children. While when a Hamas commander is killed although he obviously 'asked for it' opens up a flurry of finger pointing on the perfidy of extra-judicial death sentences.

Daniel Gordis points out in a letter to a Pro-Palestinian extreme left Jew that 'the concern for people trying to kill them is a luxury I suspect even our uncorrupted children wont have'.

This digest is a penetrating and chilling , educational , eye opening and sometimes harrowing read which cannot be ommited by anyone seriously interested in the subject.
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A comprehensive collection 12 July 2004
By Shalom Freedman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The revival of Anti- Semitism a bit more than half a decade after the Shoah is one of the most painful and disappointing realties of our time. This revival has one major source, the hatred of Israel being preached throughout the Arab and to a degree the Islamic world, a hatred which has been adopted by the Left in the West. This new anti- Semitism combines with the ' old European Fascist Anti- Semitism' which many wanted to think had disappeared with the defeat of the Nazis.
Instead we see a new improbable combination of Extreme Right and Extreme Left.
In this collection of fifty essays a good share of which are of very high quality a very serious exploration of this anti- Semitism is made. The book contains the work of the most respected people working in various areas, such as Bernard Lewis surveying the world of Islam's Anti- Semitism ,Paul Berman and Melanie Philips looking at New- Left Anti- Semitism, Dr.David Zangen an eyewitness telling of the blood- libel in the alleged Jenin massacre, Gabriel Schoenfeld on Israel and the Anti- Semites,Ruth Wisse on the consequences of ignoring Anti- Semitism.
The supposed seed of this work was Rosenbaum's reading Philip Roth's ' Operation Shylock' and considering the possibility of a 'Second Holocaust' And it is clear, and I am not sure that this is explored fully enough in this volume that the real aim of Arab Anti- Semitism anyway is the delegitimization of Israel that would lead to its destruction. In other words the new Anti-Semitism does not like the Nazi- brand focus on killing every Jew everywhere in the hope of eliminating Jews completely from the world. Its real aim is to eliminate the Jewish state, and in so doing eliminate the Jews from any place of their own in the world, and any power of their own in History.
This collection contains a great deal .It is not complete. And there are articles I would not have included. ( I do not really think it makes sense to give a hearing to those who wish to somewhat hypocritically tell the world how wonderful Jews they are in opposing the Jewish state) On the whole however a first rate work which calls attention to one of our time's most important moral questions not only for Jews but for mankind.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant collection of articles 29 Oct. 2004
By Jill Malter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book deals with hatred of Israel and many of the reactions to it. It consists of about 50 separate essays. One of the inspirations for the book was Philip Roth's novel, "Operation Shylock," and the relevant excerpt from this book is included as one of the essays. That essay explains the threat of Israel becoming a sort of extermination camp for Jews, with nuclear weapons rather than Zyklon B being the relevant weapon.

The book, which begins with an excellent introduction by Ron Rosenbaum, is a superb collection of ideas and thoughts. One of the essays that impressed me the most was by Tom Gross, describing the ghastly reporting by the British media of the events in Jenin in April, 2002. Until I read this article, I just couldn't believe that the folks at the Guardian would abandon all journalistic standards just to hurt a few Jews by spouting some absurd lies about Israel. After all, no matter what they thought about Jews or Israel, these people were professionals who I thought were unlikely to wish to destroy the good reputation the Guardian had so carefully built up. Such destruction would cost them money! But this article showed me that they had indeed turned the Guardian into something far less valuable than it had been in the past (perhaps thinking that such an approach would appear more sensational and improve their sales).

I also especially enjoyed the articles by Paul Berman, Robert Wistrich, Gabriel Schoenfeld, Ruth Wisse, Melanie Phillips, Joshua Muravchik, Martin Peretz, Cynthia Ozick, Fiamma Nirenstein, and Bernard Lewis. And of course, I had to read the essay by Daniel Gordis that started "Dear Jill." No, it wasn't to me, it was to Jill Jacobs. But it was a scary look into the politics of a graduating rabbinical student.

There are articles by various opponents of Zionism, including Tariq Ramadan, Edward Said, and Judith Butler. I think it was a good idea to allow the reader to see a little of how they view the world.

I certainly recommend this book.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know