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A Thirst for Glory: The Life of Admiral Sir Sidney Smith by [Pocock, Tom]
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A Thirst for Glory: The Life of Admiral Sir Sidney Smith Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Length: 329 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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About the Author

Tom Pocock is the author of 18 books (and editor of two more), mostly biographies but including two about his experiences as a newspaper war correspondent. Born in London in 1925 - the son of the novelist and educationist Guy Pocock - he was educated at Westminster School and Cheltenham College, joining the Royal Navy in 1943. He was at sea during the invasion of Normandy and, having suffered from ill-health, returned to civilian life and in 1945 became a war correspondent at the age of 19,the youngest of the Second World War. After four years wth the Hulton Press current affairs magazine group, he moved to the Daily Mail as feature-writer and then Naval Correspondent, becoming Naval Correspondent of The Times in 1952. In 1956, he was a foreign corresponent and special writer for the Daily Express and from 1959 was on the staff of the Evening Standard,as feature writer,Defence Correspondent and war correspondent. For the last decade of his time on the Standard he was Travel Editor. He wrote his first book, NELSON AND HIS WORLD in 1967 on his return from reporting the violence in Aden and his interest in Nelson has continued. Indeed, eight of his books are about the admiral and his contemporaries; his HORATIO NELSON was runner-up for the Whitbread Biography Award of 1987. Tom Pocock has contributed to many magazines and appeared on television documentaries about Nelson and the subject of another of his biographies,the novelist and imperialist Sir Rider Haggard.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1765 KB
  • Print Length: 329 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1909609536
  • Publisher: Thistle Publishing (6 Jun. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00D91E26A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #172,193 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Hardcover
It is perhaps inevitable that in each period of history only the principal protagonists, and often only the victor, will be remembered afterwards. From Harold and William at Hastings, through Marlborough at Blenheim, Wolfe and Montcalm at Quebec, Washington at Yorktown, Nelson at Trafalgar, Wellington and Napoleon at Waterloo, to Montgomery and Rommel at El Alamein: for the most part the names of subordinate generals, admirals and other gifted or influential personalities who had a part to play in victory or defeat are now known only to historians who have specialized in the period. Yet many of these people deserve to be known in their own right.
Tom Pocock's expertise on the life and battles of Admiral Nelson has been indisputable. In this book he reveals another talented and colourful character who was also the idol of London society - "the first lion of the day" - after a daring escape from close captivity in a Revolutionary prison in Paris. Pocock's biography is very well written, and proceeds at a cracking pace that reflects the constant stream of Sidney Smith's adventures. At times one forgets that it is a well researched biography (there are 11 pages of reference notes as well as a bibliography) for it could almost be taken for a novel. Like his rival Nelson, who has eclipsed him as a popular hero, Sidney Smith was sometimes conceited, always bold, and generally had luck on his side to carry him through his daring schemes.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read a few biographies of other leading Royal Navy seamen from the Napoleonic Wars and realise that Nelson was one of many incredible people in the navy. His exploits were as amazing as any fictional hero.
It's a great pity that Sir Sidney Smith is not better known, but his temperament did not suit the age. He would have been a well know national hero had he lived in the 20th century.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well researched and well written, the biography was slightly disappointing after Tom Pocock's excellent biography of Horatio Nelson. But then, Nelson was a more interesting character.
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